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John M. Schofield (search for this): chapter 24
t accompanied en route, to Fort Smith a week ago, report that near the Arkansas line four of our soldiers were captured by the enemy. There was no prospect, however, of the rebel force under Colonel Brooks, which was at Huntsville recently, attacking the train. There is some discussion just now as to whether General Blunt shall retain command of this district or not. His friends claim for him, also, that he is really the ranking Major General in the Department. as the appointment of Schofield as a Major General has not yet been confirmed by the United States Senate. But this continual wrangling of politicians, contractors, and sutlers, over the question as to who shall command the department and each of the different districts into which it is divided, does not tend to advance the interests of the public service. What do hangers — on of the army care for the efficiency and honesty of a commanding officer, if they can get permits from him to steal cotton and ship it north? At
E. A. Smith (search for this): chapter 24
tion. Nor should we, because he belongs to our party, and is working zealously for the success of the same principles that we are, neglect to criticise, in a good tempered spirit, his short-comings. I am satisfied that Colonel Jennison's services would be more valuable to the Government in some other field. Should he make a perfectly honorable record from now to the end of the war, it would almost wipe out the past. The supply train started south on the 20th for Fort Gibson and Forth Smith, but will encamp on Dry Wood a few days to wait for the paymaster to come down and pay off the escort before they leave. Most of the escort belongs to the Fourteenth Regiment Kansas cavalry, recently organized, and as a large number of the men have not been paid since enlistment, the amounts due them will be of great assistance in providing for the wants of many of their families during the coming winter. The need that I mentioned last summer, of some method by which the soldiers can send
e Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians have shown a disposition to return to their allegiance to the Government. There is not, however, among them, such a strong sentiment of loyalty and real affection for the Government, as among the Cherokees and Creeks. These latter people have, from the beginning of the war, shown their devotion to the United States, even under the most adverse circumstances. The battles of Pothloholo, chief of the Creeks, with rebel white and Indian troops, during the winter 1861-2, before our forces marched into the Indian country, showed a chivalrous devotion to the Union cause. When the enemy finally became too strong for him, rather than submit to rebel rule, he withdrew his forces towards southern Kansas, and nearly all his people followed him and became voluntary exiles. Now that our forces occupy the central and western portions of Arkansas, the War Department has authorized the raising of two or three more regiments from that State. The numerous deserti
read such a wide region as we have to account for. Captain Willets, of the Fourteenth Kansas cavalry, who was sent out several days ago by Colonel Blair, on scouting service in the direction of Lamar, Missouri, returned with his company on the 3rd, via Osage Mission, Kansas. He found no enemy, but, from accounts that have reached here, he permitted his men to engage in disreputable depredations, robbery and murder. If the statements made in regard to the matter are true, he deserves severo better officer could be found to thoroughly prepare a cavalry regiment for the field. Considerable interest has been manifested by the people of this State in regard to the election for State officers in Missouri, which took place on the 3rd instant. The election returns have nearly all been received by the Secretary of State, and they show that the Radical or Republican ticket has swept the State by an overwhelming majority. As far as returns have been received from the soldiers in th
octaw and Chickasaw Indians have shown a disposition to return to their allegiance to the Government. There is not, however, among them, such a strong sentiment of loyalty and real affection for the Government, as among the Cherokees and Creeks. These latter people have, from the beginning of the war, shown their devotion to the United States, even under the most adverse circumstances. The battles of Pothloholo, chief of the Creeks, with rebel white and Indian troops, during the winter 1861-2, before our forces marched into the Indian country, showed a chivalrous devotion to the Union cause. When the enemy finally became too strong for him, rather than submit to rebel rule, he withdrew his forces towards southern Kansas, and nearly all his people followed him and became voluntary exiles. Now that our forces occupy the central and western portions of Arkansas, the War Department has authorized the raising of two or three more regiments from that State. The numerous desertions
November 1st (search for this): chapter 24
lry Lieutenant Josling on a scout to Osage Mission a cold wave distressing condition of refugees General Blunt authorized to raise another colored regiment citizens of Fort Scott opposed to Colonel Jennison taking command of the post the supply train starts south a military Telegraph to be constructed to Fort Scott Twelfth Kansas infantry en route to Fort Smith Federal expedition towards Texas-mountain Federals in Arkansas they annoy the enemy. We are able to welcome the first day of November with the expression, All is quiet along the, border. There have been very few days during the last three months that one would think of making such a remark. It is almost unnecessary to state here that we need not congratulate ourselves with the thought that this peaceful state will continue very long.. Not many weeks are likely to elapse before we shall hear of guerrilla depredations in some of the border counties, causing at least a ripple of disturbance in the public mind. But
ossible. In the next place, had the line been III operation, he probably never would have made the raid. Even if the Government had not taken the matter up, it would have been a good investment for the citizens of Kansas to have taken hold of and completed at an early day. The business which the people of this section will wish to transact over the line, will, perhaps, fully pay the expense of operating it. A battalion of the Twelfth Kansas infantry came down from Kansas City on the 27th instant. After remaining here a few weeks it will march to Fort Smith to join the Army of the Frontier. This regiment, since its organization, has been on duty along the border. Colonel Adams, its commanding officer, is General Lane's son-in-law, and has perhaps been able to keep it from going to the front until now. It is a fine regiment; the men are well drilled, and do not wish to be regarded as vain carpet knights. It seems that Lieutenant Colonel Hayes has attended to drilling it and mai
h of the rebels without finding them, and is satisfied from such information as he could get, that after plundering the Mission, they went south. The season has arrived when wintry looking clouds are seen scudding across the sky. When these lowering clouds obscure the sun now and then, there is a kind of fascination in watching the dark shadows chase each other over the prairies in rapid succession. A cold wave right from the arctic regions struck southern Kansas on the morning of the 12th, and already there are reports of great suffering among the refugee families encamped about the outskirts of the post. The Marmaton River is frozen over solid, which is unusual so early in the season. There is a larger number of refugee families in this vicinity than I had supposed; and in many cases their condition is distressing. Many of them are living in rude tents made of bed clothing, or material of a very unsubstantial nature. Others during the latter part of summer and early autu
hat the Radical or Republican ticket has swept the State by an overwhelming majority. As far as returns have been received from the soldiers in the field, they show from their vote that it is very largely republican. It is certainly gratifying to contemplate such a grand victory for great principles, in view of the disadvantages with which the loyal people of that State have had to contend. Lieutenant B. F. Josling, Fourteenth Kansas cavalry, returned to this post on the evening of the 11th, with a detachment of his company from Osage Mission, where he was sent several days ago to check the depredations of a band of guerrillas that recently visited that section. He marched over the country almost to the southern line of the State in search of the rebels without finding them, and is satisfied from such information as he could get, that after plundering the Mission, they went south. The season has arrived when wintry looking clouds are seen scudding across the sky. When these
November 25th (search for this): chapter 24
felt. In some of the companies nearly all of the men are from Missouri, and their families are still living in that State, or scattered in this and adjacent counties of Kansas. The money they send home will therefore have to be trusted in the hands of friends, whom they cannot hold responsible for its loss by accident. Some of the officers and soldiers, however, will doubtless avail themselves of the Exchange Office here, and send their money to their families in cheques. On the 25th of November, United States officials commenced making arrangements to construct a military telegraph line between Kansas City and Fort Scott immediately. The contract for telegraph poles will probably be let in a few days, and their delivery along the route commence in a week or so. This line is much needed in directing the military operations of this department. Though the rebels may endeavor to destroy portions of it occasionally, it is thought that a small cavalry patrol can protect it quite
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