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West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
aine, Tuesday, February 24, 1914. He was born in Brewer, September 8, 1828, the son of Joshua and Sarah Dupee (Brastow) Chamberlain. After a course in the public schools of Brewer he attended a military school in Ellsworth where he fitted for West Point. He entered Bowdoin in 1848 and graduated in 1852 with the highest honors. At his mother's instance he then took a three years course at the Bangor Theological Seminary, fitting himself for the ministry. The master's oration delivered by himl quick and inspiring and the judgment has been drilled into coolness and leadership by some experience in life and duty. With the docility of youth he had the independence and self-reliance of manhood. Ames, the colonel, but recently from West Point, could not rest until he had advanced his regiment to as close an approximation of his ideals as the exigencies of active campaigning permitted. He found an able second in his Lieutenant. Under such instruction and leadership the 20th, compos
Eastport (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
at in the broad and high sense, was the cause battled for and spontaneous and knightly was this act of Chamberlain's, lending a permanent glow to the close of the war like that of banded evening clouds at the end of an all-day beating rain. It came from the heart and it went to the heart; and when taps shall sound for Chamberlain I wish that I could be in hearing, hear Maine's granite coast with its green islands and moon-light reflecting coves taking them up in succession from Portland to Eastport, and as the ocean's voice dies away, hear her vast wilderness of hemlock, spruce and pine repeating them with majestic pride for her beloved son. It was not mere chance that Chamberlain was selected and that he called on the famous corps to salute their old intrepid enemy at the last solemn ceremonial. Chance, mere chance? No, for God, whenever men plough the fields of great deeds in this world, sows seed broadcast for the food of the creative powers of the mind. What glorified tende
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
has never failed of recognition by any military student or historian of the battle. In the shades of evening Chamberlain was ordered to take possession of Great Round Top and he skilfully carried out the order. Soon after Gettysburg, General Chamberlain was assigned by General Griffin to the command of the 3d brigade, 2d division of the 5th corps, and was retained in it for a long time in spite of attempts to replace him by some general officer. He took part in the Culpepper and Centreville campaign and at Rappahannock Station his horse was shot under him. A severe malarial fever culminated in such prostration that he was sent to Washington for treatment in November, 1863. When recovered sufficiently to perform the duty he was assigned by the Secretary of War to service on an important court-martial sitting in Washington. His efforts to go to the front were not successful until after the Wilderness. He resumed command of his brigade and half an hour after he was order
Five Forks (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
llantly and skilfully made an assault on the works, drove the enemy, captured many prisoners and effected a lodgment on the White Oak Road. At the battle of Five Forks on the following day Chamberlain commanded two brigades on the extreme right. The 20th Maine was now in his command and occupied the post of honor. In this serters urging General Chamberlain's promotion to the full rank of Major General for distinguished and gallant services on the left, including the White Oak Road, Five Forks and Appotomattox Court House, where, says General Griffin, his bravery and efficiency were such as to entitle him to the highest commendation. In the last actiowing papers by General Chamberlain: in Volume I, The Military Operations on the White Oak Road, Virginia, March 31, 1865, read December 6, 1893; in Volume II, Five Forks, read May 2, 1900; in Volume III, Reminiscences of Petersburg and Appomattox, October, 1903, read March 2, 1904, and The Grand review of the Army of the Potomac
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
fever culminated in such prostration that he was sent to Washington for treatment in November, 1863. When recovered sufficiently to perform the duty he was assigned by the Secretary of War to service on an important court-martial sitting in Washington. His efforts to go to the front were not successful until after the Wilderness. He resumed command of his brigade and half an hour after he was ordered to take seven regiments and make a charge on the works in front of the Court House at Spottsylvania. It was deferred, however, until evening when it was successfully executed. On the first of June, 1864, a brigade was formed by the consolidation of two brigades of Pennsylvania troops of the 1st Corps and Chamberlain was assigned to the command by General Warren, commanding the corps. At Petersburg, on the 18th of June, he led an attack on a strong position from which a heavy artillery fire was directed on his advance. Many of his men were swept down and Chamberlain's horse was kill
Bowdoin (Montana, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
other's instance he then took a three years course at the Bangor Theological Seminary, fitting himself for the ministry. The master's oration delivered by him at Bowdoin in 1855 on Law and liberty so impressed the officers of the college that they invited him to become an instructor in logic and natural theology. The following yelass 1, Insignia 62; transferred to Commandery of Maine, June 6, 1866,.charter member. Professor Chamberlain made several attempts to be relieved from duty at Bowdoin that he might enter the service of his country but it was not until the first of August, 1862, that he was enabled to do so through the permission of his college ount-out in 1880. His presence and wise and prudent counsels on that occasion no doubt averted disaster and perhaps a bloody civil strife. After resigning at Bowdoin he engaged in business enterprises and was for some time in Florida. In 1890 he was appointed by President McKinley Surveyor of Customs for the port of Portland
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