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Browsing named entities in Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies..

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Fitz-John Porter (search for this): chapter 2
rps, the record of which has been obscured in consequence of the summary change of commanders early in the campaign. The Fifth Corps had a certain severity of reputation quite distinctive in the comradeship of the army. Early in its history, Porter's Division — the nucleus of it-had drawn the especial praise of General McClellan for its soldierly bearing and proficiency, being unfortunately referred to in orders as a model for the rest of the army. This had the effect of creating on the porps of the Army of the Potomac. It may not be improper to state here that there was a manifest prejudice against the Fifth Corps at Government Headquarters,--particularly at Stanton's,--on account of the supposed attachment for McClellan and Porter among its members. This was believed to be the reason why no promotion to the rank of General Officers was made in this Corps for a long time, unless secured by political influence. Brigades and even divisions were in many cases commanded by co
Phil Sheridan (search for this): chapter 2
view of occurrences on the front of the Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac, during the last essay in Grant's Virginia campaign. This was so distinctive in character, conditions, and consequences, that I have ventured to entitle it The last campaign of the armies. I trust this narrative may not seem to arrogate too much for the merits of the Fifth Corps. No eminence is claimed for it beyond others in that campaign. But the circumstance that this Corps was assigned to an active part with Sheridan during the period chiefly in view — the envelopment and final out-flanking of Lee's army warrants the prominence given in this review. It may be permitted to hope that this simple recital may throw some light on a passage of the history of this Corps, the record of which has been obscured in consequence of the summary change of commanders early in the campaign. The Fifth Corps had a certain severity of reputation quite distinctive in the comradeship of the army. Early in its histor
Lewis Grant (search for this): chapter 2
e, but what was known and said and thought and felt,--not to say, suffered; and in its darkest passages showing a steadfast purpose, patience, and spirit of obedience deserving of record even if too often without recompense, until the momentous consummation. These memoirs are based on notes made nearly at the time of the events which they describe. They give what may be called an interior view of occurrences on the front of the Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac, during the last essay in Grant's Virginia campaign. This was so distinctive in character, conditions, and consequences, that I have ventured to entitle it The last campaign of the armies. I trust this narrative may not seem to arrogate too much for the merits of the Fifth Corps. No eminence is claimed for it beyond others in that campaign. But the circumstance that this Corps was assigned to an active part with Sheridan during the period chiefly in view — the envelopment and final out-flanking of Lee's army warrants
John Stanton (search for this): chapter 2
suggestion of mine. Passages in the history of the Corps had endeared its members to each other, and brought out soldierly pride and manly character; but boastful assertion and just glorification of their Corps were remarkably less manifest among its members than with those of every one of the other splendid Corps of the Army of the Potomac. It may not be improper to state here that there was a manifest prejudice against the Fifth Corps at Government Headquarters,--particularly at Stanton's,--on account of the supposed attachment for McClellan and Porter among its members. This was believed to be the reason why no promotion to the rank of General Officers was made in this Corps for a long time, unless secured by political influence. Brigades and even divisions were in many cases commanded by colonels of State regiments. This worked a great injustice in the fact that officers of similar commands in the different Corps were not of similar relative rank, and some were theref
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
d themselves on strict observance of Army Regulations and military habitudes. The required personal relations between officers and men were quite novel and but slowly acquiesced in by volunteers who were firstclass citizens at home,--many of them equal to their official superiors. For example: my young brother, Tom, when a private in my regiment came sometimes to see me in my tent, but would not think of sitting down in my presence unless specially invited to do so. But he went home from Appomattox Lieutenant-Colonel of his regiment and Brevet-Colonel of United States Volunteers--and this on his own merits, not through any suggestion of mine. Passages in the history of the Corps had endeared its members to each other, and brought out soldierly pride and manly character; but boastful assertion and just glorification of their Corps were remarkably less manifest among its members than with those of every one of the other splendid Corps of the Army of the Potomac. It may not be
: Admitted to hospital, 3001; of whom 106 were from other corps; 27 Confederates; 107 sick. Sent to the rear, 2388; fell into the hands of the enemy, 391; died in hospital, 121; left 206, of whom 126 were able to walk in the morning. Or take the totals treated in the field hospital alone for the first nine days of the campaign. Number admitted, 5257; sent to the rear, 4190; died in hospital, 179; fell into hands of the enemy, 787. Adding to this the number killed outright, not less than 1200, and the missing, a list we do not like to analyze, not less than 1555, makes a total loss in the Corps of more than 7000 men. And the casualties of the six weeks from the Rapidan to the James bring the total to 16,245. This is 3398 more than half the present for duty at the start. The records of the Medical Inspector of the Fifth Corps show the number admitted to the field hospitals alone from May 5th to June 19th to have been II,105 of the Corps, besides many from other corps and not a
atment of disabled men in the field: It is impossible to convey an accurate idea of the number of sick and wounded who have received attention in this hospital,--that following the army. Hundreds passed through under circumstances which rendered it impossible to register their names or even accurately estimate their numbers. So unremitting were the calls for professional duty during the first fortnight that it was impossible to prepare morning reports, and it was not until the Ioth of May that even a numerical report was attempted. From that date the daily reports show that from the 16th of May to the 31st of October, 1864, there have been received into this hospital and treated for at least forty-eight hours, 68,540 sick and wounded officers and men. Rebellion Records, Serial 60, p. 271, and Serial 67, p. 269. I have often thought it would be profitable reading for some if a competent observer would recount the scenes at the rear of a fighting army removing from the
umber admitted to the field hospitals alone from May 5th to June 19th to have been II,105 of the Corps, besides many from other corps and not a few Confederates. Reckoning the killed outright as 2200, and the missing as 4000,--which is quite within the fact,makes a total of casualties for this period 17,305. Taking another source of information, we find in the Adjutant-General's Report of losses in the Corps as given in the official returns of regiments for the same period, the killed as 1670; the wounded 10,150; the missing, 4416,--a total of 16,235. Taking the additional wounded given in the field hospital records, 955,--who would not appear on the regimental morning reports,--we reach the total of 17,190. The difference in these figures is remarkably slight considering that they come from sources so distinct. And the restless, fruitless fighting before Petersburg during the remainder of that year brought the total loss in the Corps up to 18,000,--this being almost a thous
ing the Norfolk Railroad and the Jerusalem Plank Road. Owing to the casualties among commanders, the action of that day has never been adequately reported. Colonel Powell had no data on which to base a just account of the overture of Forts Sedgwick and Mahone,--surnamed by the performers Fort Hell and Fort Damnation. Glance now at the record of the whole army. Those treated in the field hospitals up to the end of October were officially reported as numbering 57,498, and to the end of December, 68,840. Report of Surgeon McParlin, Medical Director of the Army of the Potomac. Some of these, no doubt were cases of sickness, a no less real casualty; but taking the ratio of one fifth the wounded as indicating the number of the killed outright, we reach a total of 59,000 men killed and wounded in this campaign up to October 31, 1864. This is to take no account of the missing, --a list governed by no law of ratios, but determined by the peculiar circumstances of each battle; always
federates; 107 sick. Sent to the rear, 2388; fell into the hands of the enemy, 391; died in hospital, 121; left 206, of whom 126 were able to walk in the morning. Or take the totals treated in the field hospital alone for the first nine days of the campaign. Number admitted, 5257; sent to the rear, 4190; died in hospital, 179; fell into hands of the enemy, 787. Adding to this the number killed outright, not less than 1200, and the missing, a list we do not like to analyze, not less than 1555, makes a total loss in the Corps of more than 7000 men. And the casualties of the six weeks from the Rapidan to the James bring the total to 16,245. This is 3398 more than half the present for duty at the start. The records of the Medical Inspector of the Fifth Corps show the number admitted to the field hospitals alone from May 5th to June 19th to have been II,105 of the Corps, besides many from other corps and not a few Confederates. Reckoning the killed outright as 2200, and the miss
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