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) (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ridan, and to Wright (then at Danville), to pay no attention to Sherman's armistice or orders, but to push forward and cut off Johnston's retreat, while in fact Johnston had virtually surrendered already to Sherman. Halleck repeated this with added disrespect; and still more to humiliate Sherman, Stanton gave sanction by his name officially signed to a bulletin published in the New York papers entertaining the suggestion that Sherman might be influenced by pecuniary considerations to let Jeff Davis get out of the country. This was not short of infamous on Stanton's part. Sherman meant so to stigmatize it, and he did, in the face of all on a supreme public occasion. With our experience of discipline, we wondered what the next move of Stanton would be. Sherman might have declined the President's hand; but President Johnson had assured him that he knew nothing about the bulletins, as Stanton had not consulted anybody nor shown them to any member of the Cabinet. Had the President san
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
d last been with us on the hard-pressed right wing at Gettysburg: the 2d Massachusetts; 5th and 20th Connecticut; 60th, 102d, 107th, 123d, 137th, 149th, 150th New York; the 13th New Jersey; the 11th, 28th, 109th, 147th Pennsylvania; the 5th, 29th, 61st, 66th, 82d Ohio; and the 3d Wisconsin. We also gladly see the 33d Massachusetts, with the gentle and chivalrous Underwood. Leading one of the brigades we recognize the manly Coggswell of Massachusetts. These were the men with Hooker on Lookout Mountain, in the battle above the clouds, whither also their fame has risen. Not cloyed nor stinted is the greeting we give to these returning men,--for them, as for those that have passed on. Strong is the brotherhood of a common experience,--the kinship of a new birth to the broader life of a regenerated country. And now the shadows draw around us; for the long summer day is scarcely long enough for the mighty march of these far-marched men. General Sherman has told us he mustered in thes
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
a narrower scale, quickly throw men into an attitude quite antagonistic. It must be said that this hostile feeling towards the East was not a general sentiment among our Western comrades, but only of a certain class accustomed to put their individualistic sentiments into execution more frequently and energetically than their sense of loyalty to the country. For our part, surely, we had no dislike to Western men, but quite the contrary, as very many of them bore close relationship to our New England families; and as to the merits of Sherman's army we did not hesitate to do it justice or give it sincere and generous praise. The taunts thrown at us by men on that side met the retort from similar characters on our side that in their boasted march to the sea they met only fat turkeys and sucking pigs. What little truth there might have been under this satire we were not disposed to inquire, but did our best to rebuke such expressions and cultivate all around a spirit of broad loyalty
Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
slike to Western men, but quite the contrary, as very many of them bore close relationship to our New England families; and as to the merits of Sherman's army we did not hesitate to do it justice or give it sincere and generous praise. The taunts thrown at us by men on that side met the retort from similar characters on our side that in their boasted march to the sea they met only fat turkeys and sucking pigs. What little truth there might have been under this satire we were not disposed to inquire, but did our best to rebuke such expressions and cultivate all around a spirit of broad loyalty and common good-will; as to the claim that Sherman's army did all the fighting, we rested on the testimony of official figures, which showed the losses of Sherman's army from Chattanooga to Atlanta, 31,687 men; Meade's losses for the same period, from the Rapidan to Petersburg, 88,387. Time, however, soon settled these bickerings by separation and return to the duties of a common citizenship.
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
evation, whether allies or aliens. As a climax, with significance which one might ponder, whole families of freed slaves, as servants, trustfully leading their little ones, obedient to fate, silent, without sign of joy; more touching in some ways than the proud passing column; more touching in some deep ways than the spectacle of captive kings led in the triumph of imperial Rome. So pass in due order of precedence all the corps of that historic army,--the men of Shiloh, of Corinth, of Vicksburg, of Missionary Ridge, of Chattanooga, Chickamauga, and Altoona. We cannot name them familiarly, but we accord them admiration. And now comes a corps which we of the Army of the Potomac may be pardoned for looking on with peculiar interest. It is the Twentieth Corps, led by Mower, the consolidation of our old Eleventh and Twelfth (Howard's and Slocum's), reduced now to scarcely more than two divisions, those of Williams and Geary. We recognize regiments that had last been with us on
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
like to Western men, but quite the contrary, as very many of them bore close relationship to our New England families; and as to the merits of Sherman's army we did not hesitate to do it justice or give it sincere and generous praise. The taunts thrown at us by men on that side met the retort from similar characters on our side that in their boasted march to the sea they met only fat turkeys and sucking pigs. What little truth there might have been under this satire we were not disposed to inquire, but did our best to rebuke such expressions and cultivate all around a spirit of broad loyalty and common good-will; as to the claim that Sherman's army did all the fighting, we rested on the testimony of official figures, which showed the losses of Sherman's army from Chattanooga to Atlanta, 31,687 men; Meade's losses for the same period, from the Rapidan to Petersburg, 88,387. Time, however, soon settled these bickerings by separation and return to the duties of a common citizenship.
Chickamauga (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
with significance which one might ponder, whole families of freed slaves, as servants, trustfully leading their little ones, obedient to fate, silent, without sign of joy; more touching in some ways than the proud passing column; more touching in some deep ways than the spectacle of captive kings led in the triumph of imperial Rome. So pass in due order of precedence all the corps of that historic army,--the men of Shiloh, of Corinth, of Vicksburg, of Missionary Ridge, of Chattanooga, Chickamauga, and Altoona. We cannot name them familiarly, but we accord them admiration. And now comes a corps which we of the Army of the Potomac may be pardoned for looking on with peculiar interest. It is the Twentieth Corps, led by Mower, the consolidation of our old Eleventh and Twelfth (Howard's and Slocum's), reduced now to scarcely more than two divisions, those of Williams and Geary. We recognize regiments that had last been with us on the hard-pressed right wing at Gettysburg: the 2
Shiloh, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
rom some corresponding elevation, whether allies or aliens. As a climax, with significance which one might ponder, whole families of freed slaves, as servants, trustfully leading their little ones, obedient to fate, silent, without sign of joy; more touching in some ways than the proud passing column; more touching in some deep ways than the spectacle of captive kings led in the triumph of imperial Rome. So pass in due order of precedence all the corps of that historic army,--the men of Shiloh, of Corinth, of Vicksburg, of Missionary Ridge, of Chattanooga, Chickamauga, and Altoona. We cannot name them familiarly, but we accord them admiration. And now comes a corps which we of the Army of the Potomac may be pardoned for looking on with peculiar interest. It is the Twentieth Corps, led by Mower, the consolidation of our old Eleventh and Twelfth (Howard's and Slocum's), reduced now to scarcely more than two divisions, those of Williams and Geary. We recognize regiments that
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
nooga, Chickamauga, and Altoona. We cannot name them familiarly, but we accord them admiration. And now comes a corps which we of the Army of the Potomac may be pardoned for looking on with peculiar interest. It is the Twentieth Corps, led by Mower, the consolidation of our old Eleventh and Twelfth (Howard's and Slocum's), reduced now to scarcely more than two divisions, those of Williams and Geary. We recognize regiments that had last been with us on the hard-pressed right wing at Gettysburg: the 2d Massachusetts; 5th and 20th Connecticut; 60th, 102d, 107th, 123d, 137th, 149th, 150th New York; the 13th New Jersey; the 11th, 28th, 109th, 147th Pennsylvania; the 5th, 29th, 61st, 66th, 82d Ohio; and the 3d Wisconsin. We also gladly see the 33d Massachusetts, with the gentle and chivalrous Underwood. Leading one of the brigades we recognize the manly Coggswell of Massachusetts. These were the men with Hooker on Lookout Mountain, in the battle above the clouds, whither also thei
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
s, laden with such stores as they had gathered from the country through which they passed, was a remarkable feature in a military review. We were told that General Sherman witnessing our review had told his leading commanders that our military appearance and even marching could not be surpassed or even equalled by their own men, and it was resolved that they would not make the attempt to rival us in this regard but would appear as nearly as possible as they looked while marching through Georgia. But they did both. As was to be expected, their marching was superb, both steady and free, not as if forced for the occasion, but by habit or second nature: distances maintained; lines perfectly dressed on the guide left ; eyes steady to the front. Further evidence of the liberality of their commanders in yielding something to the spirit of liberty, or at least to the instinct so significantly planted in man to establish relations with the kingdoms or subjects of nature supposed to b
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