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Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
brought into contact with the ruin, waste, and desolation that had been wrought upon proud old Virginia, and her once prosperous homes. Well were they reluctant to declare themselves foes of the Ameiate personal and domestic plans can be sanctioned and consummated, no doubt, under the laws of Virginia, proceeds the prosy, didactic court of final resort, but Virginia is not at present exercising Virginia is not at present exercising her functions as a State anywhere; and under the jurisdiction of what you will allow to be the de facto power of the United States, in order to enjoy its advantages and reciprocate its good will, you resplendent as the onlooking sun. One half the corps had gone, passing the death-streams of all Virginia's rivers; two hundred miles of furrowed earth and the infinite of heaven held each their own. Wthe tarry of a night. I had my headquarters in the front yard — not the house — of a courteous Virginia gentleman of the old school, who seemed to like my name, which if braced with an aristocratic y
San Sebastian (Spain) (search for this): chapter 9
oods, military and merchandise, had been stored there, it was said; many citizens had gathered there for safety against the marauders of a demoralized army; a young ladies' seminary, we were told, serving especially as a sort of sanctuary for the tender and sensitive, which they thought would b6 respected even in those turbulent times. How could we be sure that change of century had made men different from what they were when Tilly at Magdeburg, Cromwell at Wexford, or Wellington at San Sebastian had been powerless to restrain dire passions, excited by far less cause? How could we be sure that lessons and thoughts of home, the habit of well formed character, and the discipline of the field would be sufficient to hold within the bounds of patience men who saw that most innocent and noble-hearted man, their best-beloved, the stricken victim of infernal outrage? I knew my men thoroughly, high-minded and self-controlled; but what if now this blackest crime should fire their hearts
Dinwiddie Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
e book and kiss the officer. Her charming and coquettish ways, indicating a habit of easy conquest, caused an aesthetic efflorescence among the emotional susceptibilities of this personage, and so melted the firm face of his official habit, that he did not consider himself wholly fit for duty, and came to me stating the case, and asking if he might bring the reluctant petitioner for a hearing before me. Of course I assented, notwithstanding his remark that she was considered the belle of Dinwiddie, and the fact that I was not then on the superannuated list myself. Her graceful bearing as she entered my tent, composed manner of address, and I must add her beauty as she adjusted herself to our courtesies, left me no doubt of her status,--whatever might be my own. My guests took two camp chairs placed at an angle from my center of about sixty degrees, which I believe is the frost angle, perhaps salutary here. I could not but be amused at their mutual bearing in stating the case in wh
Farmville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
such mingling of the elements — a kind of icnthyosaurian sleep came at last-dreaming that the whole earth was about this way once, and fully sympathizing with the Hebrew description of it as Tohoo vaw Vohoo, if not exactly without form and void. In the morning the men sighted the few places where they could get splinters enough to make a fire to cook their last ration of pickled pork and gunpowder. Then pulling out at 6 A. M. under chilly rain and lowering clouds, we took the road for Farmville. It was Sunday afternoon when we reached its vicinity, and were welcomed by a sky clear and serene, overlooking the town. The trains were there, and so a breakfast — in literal terms, though belated fact. The clouds had rolled away and field and camp were flooded with sunshine. All the domestic arts were soon in evidence, --largely that of washing-day;--as if we had not had enough in the previous twenty-four hours. Gradually a Sabbath peace stole over the scene. All were at rest, mind
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
make the day of calamity their holiday. Such had been the case at Richmond but a few weeks before, when, freed from the control of Lee's armynotice came to us that we were to prepare to move and to start for Richmond on the 2d of May. It may be a trace of that curious paradox inthem, and now there must be but one flag. At evening we reached Manchester, a pleasant little town opposite Richmond where we closed up to bRichmond where we closed up to be ready to pass through Richmond the next day in ceremonial order. But a heavy rain kept us rather quiet all day, except for some who with diRichmond the next day in ceremonial order. But a heavy rain kept us rather quiet all day, except for some who with difficulty got permission to go over and visit the famed city which the newspapers had ordered us on to since 1861. Our camp made slender shelt Road, and on the morning of the sixth we prepared to pass through Richmond. These two corps were all; the Ninth had been set loose again frorsuit of Lee. Yet on we pressed, out through the fortifications of Richmond, and not inward, whither we had so long striven; but now when we
Hatcher's Run (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ts headquarters at Wilson's, which was in the vicinity of our conflicts on the White Oak Road; my Second Brigade, under General Gregory, made headquarters at Ford's Station, its jurisdiction covering the battlefields of Five Forks, Dinwiddie, and the White Oak Road; and the Third, the Veteran Brigade, of nine regiments-lately my own-commanded now by Colonel Edmunds of the 22 Massachusetts, was placed at Sutherland's Station, which covered the fields of the Quaker Road, Armstrong's Mill, Hatcher's Run, and of many minor fights on the left of our old entrenched lines. It was familiar ground. It was painful to be brought into contact with the ruin, waste, and desolation that had been wrought upon proud old Virginia, and her once prosperous homes. Well were they reluctant to declare themselves foes of the American Union; dearly had they paid for the distinction when the Confederacy demanded that its defiance to the Union should be enforced under their prestige and entrenched upon thei
Jericho Mills (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
s on the road or in camp. And so the strange column set forth bearing in its train that burden of unlost belongings, as Moses coming up out of Egypt through the wilderness of the Red Sea, bearing with him the bones of Joseph the well-beloved. Ayres led that day; we had the rear of the column, with the artillery. Passing through Hanover Court House, and crossing the Pamunkey, we made twelve miles march and camped at Concord Church, not far from our battlefield of the North Anna and Jericho Mills. On the 8th, the Third Division led, the First following. We crossed the Mattapony and bivouacked at Milford, south of Bowling Green, at 5 P. M., having marched about fifteen miles. On the 9th, we moved at 7 A. M., passing through Bowling Green, which wakened for me thrilling reminiscences of a rear-guard fight, and crossing the Massaponax we encamped near Fredericksburg not far from our old battlefields of 1862. We made this long march more easily because of the fine Bowling Green Pi
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 9
nal was kept by somebody as a memento: Washington, April 15, 1865. The President died this we knew as yet of the condition of things at Washington was what the brief telegram had told. But o his own treatment when we should arrive at Washington. We well knew what his mood and meditationsre is nothing for it but to push the army to Washington, and make Grant military dictator until we cppointed for the funeral of the President at Washington, an order came from the War Department for ufor it was of theirs also — the sacrifice at Washington. Steadfast and noble in every test, unto tho not think they all went to the archives at Washington. Nor would I quite wish to disclose all thantly already pillaged. The famous statue of Washington stood solitary in the square, seeming to rebrincess Salm-Salm the Valkyrie, the witching Washington belles, strange new colors flying, sweet forcrossed the Aquia Creek, old debouchure from Washington of all that food for death, and of the spec
Bowling Green (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ld of the North Anna and Jericho Mills. On the 8th, the Third Division led, the First following. We crossed the Mattapony and bivouacked at Milford, south of Bowling Green, at 5 P. M., having marched about fifteen miles. On the 9th, we moved at 7 A. M., passing through Bowling Green, which wakened for me thrilling reminiscences oBowling Green, which wakened for me thrilling reminiscences of a rear-guard fight, and crossing the Massaponax we encamped near Fredericksburg not far from our old battlefields of 1862. We made this long march more easily because of the fine Bowling Green Pike that served us a good part of the way. Although we had marched twenty miles, some of the men of the First Division could not resist Bowling Green Pike that served us a good part of the way. Although we had marched twenty miles, some of the men of the First Division could not resist the opportunity to visit the storied Marye's Heights, up which they had charged,--the fifth line they had seen go on to be swallowed up in flame, and cut level with the earth the moment it reached the fatal crest before the stone wall,--and holding flat to earth, were able to be drawn off only under the blackness of a rainy midnigh
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
d the consciousness that what we had lost and what we had won had passed into the nation's peace; our service into her mastery, our worth into her well-being, our life into her life. Now the satisfied earth, returning its excess of rain heavenward in canopy of mists, overspread us with shadow, shutting us in with ourselves. But just as we reached the heights, the clouds withdrew their veil, and the broad sunlight lay upon the resplendent city; highest the dome of the delivered Capitol, and nearest, it seemed, the White House, home of Lincoln's mighty wrestle and immortal triumph. Around us some were welcoming with cheers; but for our part, weighted with thought, we went through our accustomed motions mechanically, in a great silence. The sun, transfiguring for a moment our closing ranks, went down in glorious promise for the morrow,--leaving us there to ourselves again, on the banks of the river whose name and fame we bore, flowing in darkness past us, as from dream to dream.
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