hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Hardeman Stuart 412 0 Browse Search
J. E. B. Stuart 370 0 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 293 3 Browse Search
Fitz Lee 279 23 Browse Search
Virginia (Virginia, United States) 172 0 Browse Search
Jeb Stuart 154 4 Browse Search
Jack Mosby 150 0 Browse Search
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) 128 0 Browse Search
Richmond (Virginia, United States) 124 0 Browse Search
Beauregard 110 16 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War.. Search the whole document.

Found 55 total hits in 17 results.

1 2
Capitol (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
s he knew, and he continued his career, trusting to time. He fought for secession; joined the First Virginia Regiment, and served at Charlestown, in the John Brown raid. Then war came in due time. He was elected captain of the Blues-the oldest volunteer company in Virginia-took the leadership from the first, as one born to command, and fought and fell at that bloody Roanoke fight, at the head of his company, and cheering on his men. His body was brought back to Richmond, laid in the capitol, and buried, in presence of a great concourse of mourners, in Hollywood Cemetery. That was the end of the brief young life-death in defence of his native land, and a grave in the beloved soil, by the side of the great river, and the ashes of Monroe, brought thither by himself and his associates. Then came a revulsion. His character was better understood; his faults were forgotten; his virtues recognised. Even his old opponents hastened to express their sympathy and admiration. It wa
knowledged that there was some excuse for the misconception. He had little of the spirit of conciliation if he believed a man to be his foe; managed early to arouse bitter enmities; and continued to defy his opponents without deigning to explain his character or his motives. Before he was better understood-when the mists were only beginning to clear away, and show his virtues of devotion, and patriotism, and kindness-death called him. Born in Virginia, and going in his early manhood to Europe, as Secretary of Legation, he there perfected himself in riding, fencing, and all manly exercises; studying political science, and training himself, consciously or unconsciously, for the arena upon which he was to enter soon after his return. He came to Virginia at a time when the atmosphere was stifling with the heat of contending factions in politics, and becoming the chief editor of the Richmond Enquirer, plunged into the struggle with all the ardour of a young and ambitious soldier who
Balaklava (Ukraine) (search for this): chapter 1.13
habit, or training, or calculation of forces, was in him that of native endowment and birthright. To match himself, if need be, against any odds, however overwhelming, and breast all opposition with a stubborn, dauntless front, was to act as his character dictated, and to follow his temperament. The sentiment of fear, I believe, never entered his breast; if it did, it never stayed there long enough for him to make its acquaintance. He would have led the charge of the English cavalry at Balaklava with the nerve and dash of Hotspur, glorying in the roar of the enemy's artillery, and resolute to take their guns or die. At Thermopylae, he would have stood beside Leonidas, and fought and died without the shudder of a nerve. In battle at the head of his men, his coolness and resolution were invincible. The grim front of war possessed no terrors for him, and he advanced into the gulf of battle with the calmness of a holiday soldier on parade. 2. He was early in the lists as the
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
better understood-when the mists were only beginning to clear away, and show his virtues of devotion, and patriotism, and kindness-death called him. Born in Virginia, and going in his early manhood to Europe, as Secretary of Legation, he there perfected himself in riding, fencing, and all manly exercises; studying political science, and training himself, consciously or unconsciously, for the arena upon which he was to enter soon after his return. He came to Virginia at a time when the atmosphere was stifling with the heat of contending factions in politics, and becoming the chief editor of the Richmond Enquirer, plunged into the struggle with all thsleeps in the bosom of the land he loved, and toiled, and thought, and fought, and died for. His is not the least worthy heart which has poured out its blood for Virginia and the South; and in the pages of our annals, among the names of our dead heroes who surrendered youth, and coming fame, and friends, and home, and life for the
Charlestown, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
his hatreds were capricious and implacable; that his nature was that of the tiger, thirsting for blood; his conscience paralysed or warped by a terrible moral disease. His splendid oratory, his trenchant pen, the dash and courage of his nature, were allowed; but these were his only good gifts; he was, they said, the Ishmael of the modern world. All this he knew, and he continued his career, trusting to time. He fought for secession; joined the First Virginia Regiment, and served at Charlestown, in the John Brown raid. Then war came in due time. He was elected captain of the Blues-the oldest volunteer company in Virginia-took the leadership from the first, as one born to command, and fought and fell at that bloody Roanoke fight, at the head of his company, and cheering on his men. His body was brought back to Richmond, laid in the capitol, and buried, in presence of a great concourse of mourners, in Hollywood Cemetery. That was the end of the brief young life-death in def
Roanoke (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
rved at Charlestown, in the John Brown raid. Then war came in due time. He was elected captain of the Blues-the oldest volunteer company in Virginia-took the leadership from the first, as one born to command, and fought and fell at that bloody Roanoke fight, at the head of his company, and cheering on his men. His body was brought back to Richmond, laid in the capitol, and buried, in presence of a great concourse of mourners, in Hollywood Cemetery. That was the end of the brief young lifg all with his own brave spirit. Then, when his acknowledged capacity for leadership placed him at the head of a command, he took the post as his of right, and led his men as all who knew him expected. How he led them on that disastrous day at Roanoke — with what heroic nerve, and splendid gallantry, in the face of the deadliest firelet his old comrades in arms declare. There, in the front of battle, he fell-giving his life without a single regret to the cause he loved. It was the phase
Roanoke Island (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
Jennings Wise: Captain of the Blues I. I found in an old portfolio, the other day, the following slip from a Norfolk paper of the year 1862: The Confederate steamer Arrow arrived here this morning, from Currituck, having communicated with a steamer sent down to Roanoke Island under a flag of truce. She brought up the bodies of Captain O. J. Wise, Lieutenant William Selden, and Captain Coles. Captain Wise was pierced by three balls, and Lieutenant Selden was shot through the head. The Yankees who saw Captain Wise during the fierce and unequal contest, declare that he displayed a gallantry and valour never surpassed. Alas, that he has fallen in a contest so unequal! But who has fallen more honourably, more nobly? Young Selden, too, died at his gun, while gallantly fighting the enemy that had gathered in so superior numbers upon our shores. Last night, when the steamer arrived at Currituck, General Wise directed that the coffin containing the remains of his son be
Currituck (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
Jennings Wise: Captain of the Blues I. I found in an old portfolio, the other day, the following slip from a Norfolk paper of the year 1862: The Confederate steamer Arrow arrived here this morning, from Currituck, having communicated with a steamer sent down to Roanoke Island under a flag of truce. She brought up the bodies of Captain O. J. Wise, Lieutenant William Selden, and Captain Coles. Captain Wise was pierced by three balls, and Lieutenant Selden was shot through the heaa contest so unequal! But who has fallen more honourably, more nobly? Young Selden, too, died at his gun, while gallantly fighting the enemy that had gathered in so superior numbers upon our shores. Last night, when the steamer arrived at Currituck, General Wise directed that the coffin containing the remains of his son be opened. Then, I learn from those who were present, a scene transpired that words cannot describe. The old hero bent over the body of his son, on whose pale face the f
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
ern world. All this he knew, and he continued his career, trusting to time. He fought for secession; joined the First Virginia Regiment, and served at Charlestown, in the John Brown raid. Then war came in due time. He was elected captain of the Blues-the oldest volunteer company in Virginia-took the leadership from the first, as one born to command, and fought and fell at that bloody Roanoke fight, at the head of his company, and cheering on his men. His body was brought back to Richmond, laid in the capitol, and buried, in presence of a great concourse of mourners, in Hollywood Cemetery. That was the end of the brief young life-death in defence of his native land, and a grave in the beloved soil, by the side of the great river, and the ashes of Monroe, brought thither by himself and his associates. Then came a revulsion. His character was better understood; his faults were forgotten; his virtues recognised. Even his old opponents hastened to express their sympathy a
having communicated with a steamer sent down to Roanoke Island under a flag of truce. She brought up the bodies of Captain O. J. Wise, Lieutenant William Selden, and Captain Coles. Captain Wise was pierced by three balls, and Lieutenant Selden was sCaptain Wise was pierced by three balls, and Lieutenant Selden was shot through the head. The Yankees who saw Captain Wise during the fierce and unequal contest, declare that he displayed a gallantry and valour never surpassed. Alas, that he has fallen in a contest so unequal! But who has fallen more honourably, mCaptain Wise during the fierce and unequal contest, declare that he displayed a gallantry and valour never surpassed. Alas, that he has fallen in a contest so unequal! But who has fallen more honourably, more nobly? Young Selden, too, died at his gun, while gallantly fighting the enemy that had gathered in so superior numbers upon our shores. Last night, when the steamer arrived at Currituck, General Wise directed that the coffin containing the rGeneral Wise directed that the coffin containing the remains of his son be opened. Then, I learn from those who were present, a scene transpired that words cannot describe. The old hero bent over the body of his son, on whose pale face the full moon threw its light, kissed the cold brow many times, an
1 2