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Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.25
. Jackson calculated upon this, but fortune seemed against him. At the Catherine Furnace, a mile or two from the Federal line, his march was discovered, and a hot attack was made on his rear-guard as he moved past. All seemed now discovered, but, strange to say, such was not the fact. The Federal officers saw him plainly, but the winding road which he pursued chanced here to bend toward the south, and it was afterward discovered that General Hooker supposed him to be in full retreat upon Richmond. Such at least was the statement of Federal officers. Jackson repulsed the attack upon his rear, continued his march, and striking into what is called the Brock Road, turned the head of his column northward, and rapidly advanced around General Hooker's right flank. A cavalry force under General Stuart had moved in front and on the flanks of the column, driving off scouting parties and other too inquisitive wayfarers; and on reaching the junction of the Orange and Germanna roads a heavy F
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 2.25
It was obviously necessary to amputate the arm, and one of his surgeons asked, If we find amputation necessary, General, shall it be done at once? to which he replied with alacrity, Yes, certainly, Dr. McGuire, do for me whatever you think right. The arm was then taken off, and he slept soundly after the operation, and on waking, began to converse about the battle. If I had not been wounded, he said, or had had one hour more of daylight, I would have cut off the enemy from the road to United States ford; we would have had them entirely surrounded, and they would have been obliged to surrender or cut their way out; they had no other alternative. My troops may sometimes fail in driving an enemy from a position, but the enemy always fails to drive my men from a position. It was about this time that we received the following letter from General Lee: I have just received your note informing me that you were wounded. I cannot express my regret at the occurrence. Could I have directed
Rappahannock (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.25
ails of which are known only to a few persons; and yet it is no exaggeration to say that many thousands would feel an interest in the particulars. I mean the death of Jackson. The minute circumstances attending it have never been published, and they are here recorded as matter of historical as well as personal interest. A few words will describe the situation of affairs when this tragic scene took place. The spring of 1862 saw a large Federal army assembled on the north bank of the Rappahannock, and on the first of May, General Hooker, its commander, had crossed, and firmly established himself at Chancellorsville. General Lee's forces were opposite Fredericksburg chiefly, a small body of infantry only watching the upper fords. This latter was compelled to fall back before General Hooker's army of about one hundred and fifty thousand men, and Lee hastened by forced marches from Fredericksburg toward Chancellorsville, with a force of about thirty thousand men-Longstreet being ab
Orange Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.25
vantages to the Federal troops that an assault there was impossible, and the result of the consultation was the adoption of Jackson's suggestion to attack the enemy's right. Every preparation was made that night, and on the morning of May second, Jackson set out with Hill's, Rodes's, and Colston's divisions, in all about twenty-two thousand men, to accomplish his undertaking. Chancellorsville was a single brick house of large dimensions, situated on the plank-road from Fredericksburg to Orange, and all around it were the thickets of the country known as the Wilderness. In this tangled undergrowth the Federal works had been thrown up, and such was the denseness of the woods that a column moving a mile or two to the south was not apt to be seen. Jackson calculated upon this, but fortune seemed against him. At the Catherine Furnace, a mile or two from the Federal line, his march was discovered, and a hot attack was made on his rear-guard as he moved past. All seemed now discovered
Wilderness Run (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.25
emed about to close his eyes and die in the night. But such was not to be the result then. When asked by one of the officers whether he was much hurt, he opened his eyes and said quietly without further exhibition of pain, No, my friend, don't trouble yourself about me. The litter was then raised upon the shoulders of the men, the party continued their way, and reaching an ambulance near Melzi Chancellor's placed the wounded General in it. He was then borne to the field hospital at Wilderness Run, some five miles distant. Here he lay throughout the next day, Sunday, listening to the thunder of the artillery and the long roll of the musketry from Chancellorsville, where Stuart, who had succeeded him in command, was pressing General Hooker back toward the Rappahannock. His soul must have thrilled at that sound, long so familiar, but he could take no part in the conflict. Lying faint and pale, in a tent in rear of the Wilderness Tavern, he seemed to be perfectly resigned, and
Port Republic (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.25
light passing through the foliage overhead, revealed his pale face, closed eyes, and bleeding breast. Those around him thought that he was dying. What a death for such a man! All around him was the tangled wood, only half illumined by the struggling moonbeams; above him burst the shells of the enemy, exploding, says an officer, like showers of falling stars, and in the pauses came the melancholy notes of the whippoorwills, borne on the night air. In this strange wilderness, the man of Port Republic and Manassas, who had led so many desperate charges, seemed about to close his eyes and die in the night. But such was not to be the result then. When asked by one of the officers whether he was much hurt, he opened his eyes and said quietly without further exhibition of pain, No, my friend, don't trouble yourself about me. The litter was then raised upon the shoulders of the men, the party continued their way, and reaching an ambulance near Melzi Chancellor's placed the wounded Ge
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.25
rossed, and firmly established himself at Chancellorsville. General Lee's forces were opposite Fredforced marches from Fredericksburg toward Chancellorsville, with a force of about thirty thousand mehe right flank of General Hooker, west of Chancellorsville. The ground on his left and in his frontd men, to accomplish his undertaking. Chancellorsville was a single brick house of large dimensi in confusion upon the heavy works around Chancellorsville. Rodes and Colston followed them, took pte troops were within less than a mile of Chancellorsville, preparing for a new and more determined ode forward in front of the troops toward Chancellorsville, and here and then the bullet struck him as Melzi Chancellor's, about a mile from Chancellorsville, and had reached a point nearly opposite n the turnpike from the works in front of Chancellorsville, and a hurricane of shell and canister swry and the long roll of the musketry from Chancellorsville, where Stuart, who had succeeded him in c
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.25
Jackson's death-wound. I. There is an event of the late war, the details of which are knowesult of the consultation was the adoption of Jackson's suggestion to attack the enemy's right. Evof the thickets on each side of the road. Jackson's assault was sudden and terrible. It struckparing for a new and more determined attack. Jackson's plan was worthy of being the last military ls which follow are given on the authority of Jackson's staff officers, and one or two others who wey was fired from the Confederate infantry in Jackson's rear, and on the right of the road-evidentlhis fire has never been discovered, and after Jackson's death there was little disposition to invesd in the wood lay many wounded and dying men. Jackson's whole party, except Captain Wilbourn and a ed, or dispersed. The man riding just behind Jackson had had his horse killed; a courier near was ptain Forbes was killed; and Captain Boswell, Jackson's chief engineer, was shot through the heart,[3 more...]
Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.25
on the first of May, General Hooker, its commander, had crossed, and firmly established himself at Chancellorsville. General Lee's forces were opposite Fredericksburg chiefly, a small body of infantry only watching the upper fords. This latter was compelled to fall back before General Hooker's army of about one hundred and fifty thousand men, and Lee hastened by forced marches from Fredericksburg toward Chancellorsville, with a force of about thirty thousand men-Longstreet being absent at Suffolk — to check the further advance of the enemy. This was on May ist, and the Confederate advance force under Jackson, on the same evening, attacked General Hooker's intrenchments facing toward Fredericksburg. They were found impregnable, the dense thickets having been converted into abattis, and every avenue of approach defended with artillery. General Lee therefore directed the assault to cease, and consulted with his corps commanders as to further operations. Jackson suggested a rapid m
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.25
hrough the foliage overhead, revealed his pale face, closed eyes, and bleeding breast. Those around him thought that he was dying. What a death for such a man! All around him was the tangled wood, only half illumined by the struggling moonbeams; above him burst the shells of the enemy, exploding, says an officer, like showers of falling stars, and in the pauses came the melancholy notes of the whippoorwills, borne on the night air. In this strange wilderness, the man of Port Republic and Manassas, who had led so many desperate charges, seemed about to close his eyes and die in the night. But such was not to be the result then. When asked by one of the officers whether he was much hurt, he opened his eyes and said quietly without further exhibition of pain, No, my friend, don't trouble yourself about me. The litter was then raised upon the shoulders of the men, the party continued their way, and reaching an ambulance near Melzi Chancellor's placed the wounded General in it. He
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