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Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.35
This. My horse was killed, and as we poor Confederates are not over rich, I will lay you a horse and equipments that I make my escape. The General greeted this proposal with evident enjoyment. In what time? he asked. Before you reach Richmond. He made a humorous grimace. Richmond is a long way off, Captain-let the limit be the 1st day of August, and I will agree. Very well, General; I will pay my bet if I lose; and if I win, you will send me my horse through the lines. MRichmond is a long way off, Captain-let the limit be the 1st day of August, and I will agree. Very well, General; I will pay my bet if I lose; and if I win, you will send me my horse through the lines. Most assuredly. At this moment an orderly brought in a dispatch, which the General read with attention. From the front, he said. Jackson is at Darkesville, Captain, and is preparing to make a stand there. And you will attack, I suppose, in a day or two, General? These words were greeted with a quick glance, to which I responded innocently: As I have no chance to escape in that time, you could reply without an indiscretion, could you not, General? Caution is never amiss, m
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.35
of Washington, with his headquarters at Manassas, Johnston held the Valley against Patterson, with his headquarters at Winchester. Well, it was late in June, I think, when intelligence came that General Patterson was about to cross the Potomac at W You shall not be confined. I will take your parole, and you can then have the freedom of the town of Martinsburg. Winchester, too, if you wish. I am very much obliged to you, especially for Winchester, General-but I cannot accept. Why notWinchester, General-but I cannot accept. Why not? Because I am going to try to escape. The General began to laugh. You will find it impossible, he replied; even if you eluded the sentinel you could not get through my lines. The pickets would stop you. General, I said, you are reallythered in the middle of the street to ask the news. I continued the gallop without stopping, and in an hour approached Winchester, where Johnston had established his general headquarters. Beyond the Opequon my bay staggered, blood rushed from hi
Darkesville (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.35
lines. Most assuredly. At this moment an orderly brought in a dispatch, which the General read with attention. From the front, he said. Jackson is at Darkesville, Captain, and is preparing to make a stand there. And you will attack, I suppose, in a day or two, General? These words were greeted with a quick glance, ll the morning, and thought when the picket fired that you were the enemy. Soon afterwards I parted from this great soldier; and riding on, found Jackson at Darkesville, to whom I reported, receiving his congratulations upon my escape. But I must hasten on and tell you about my horse. Iv. A few days afterwards I was air, I replied; this moment, if necessary. Very good; ride back with me to headquarters, and I will give you a message also. I followed the General back to Darkesville, waited an hour, and then was sent for, and received the dispatch and instructions. On the same night I set out on my bay horse, and by morning was at General
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 3.35
onducted me to an apartment on the left, where I was received by a staff officer, whose scowling hauteur was exceedingly offensive. Who are you? he growled, looking at me in the most insolent manner. Who are you? was my response, in a tone equally friendly. I will have no insolence, was his enraged reply. Are you the prisoner sent for by the General? I am, sir, was my reply; and I shall ascertain from General Patterson whether it is by his order that an officer of the Confederate States Army is subjected to your rudeness and insults. He must have been a poor creature; for as soon as he found that I would not endure his brow-beating he became polite, and went to announce my arrival. I was left alone in the ante-room with an officer, who wrote so busily at his desk that he seemed not to have even been aware of any one's presence; and this busy gentleman I afterwards discovered was General Patterson's Adjutant-General. Ii. I waited for half an hour, when I
Williamsport (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.35
Jackson-he was not General or Stonewall yet-and had reported a few days before the engagement at Falling Waters. I need not inform you of the state of affairs at that time, further than to say that while Beauregard watched the enemy in front of Washington, with his headquarters at Manassas, Johnston held the Valley against Patterson, with his headquarters at Winchester. Well, it was late in June, I think, when intelligence came that General Patterson was about to cross the Potomac at Williamsport, and Colonel Jackson was sent forward with the First Brigade, as it was then called, to support Stuart's cavalry, and feel the enemy, but not bring on a general engagement. This, the Colonel proceeded to do with alacrity, and he had soon advanced north of Martinsburg, and camped near the little village of Hainesville-Stuart continuing in front watching the enemy on the river. This was the state of things, when suddenly one morning we were aroused by the intelligence that Patterson h
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.35
not inform you of the state of affairs at that time, further than to say that while Beauregard watched the enemy in front of Washington, with his headquarters at Manassas, Johnston held the Valley against Patterson, with his headquarters at Winchester. Well, it was late in June, I think, when intelligence came that General Patterk at me; then Jackson beckoned to me. I rode up and saluted the General, who gravely returned the bow, and said: Captain, I have determined to send you to Manassas with a dispatch to General Beauregard, which I wish delivered at once. The dispatch will be ready in two hours from this time, and I would like to have you set the horse. Doubtful! replied Johnston, with his calm, grim smile; and saluting me, he rode away rapidly. Six hours afterwards his army was in motion for Manassas, where the advance arrived on the night of the zoth of July. On the next day Jackson's brigade held the enemy in check, and Kirby Smith ended the fight by his a
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.35
l give you one of my own in place of him, for he has enabled you to bring me information, upon the receipt of which the result of the battle at Manassas depended. I wonder if General Patterson contemplated such a thing, General, when he sent me the horse. Doubtful! replied Johnston, with his calm, grim smile; and saluting me, he rode away rapidly. Six hours afterwards his army was in motion for Manassas, where the advance arrived on the night of the zoth of July. On the next day Jackson's brigade held the enemy in check, and Kirby Smith ended the fight by his assault upon their right. Jackson and Smith belonged to the Army of the Shenandoah, and this will show you that without that army the battle would have been lost. I brought that army, my dear friend, by means of General Patterson's bay horse! Such was the narrative of Captain Longbow, and I would like to know how much of it is true. The incident of the hard ride, and the death of the Captain's horse especia
Brussels (Belgium) (search for this): chapter 3.35
was left alone in the ante-room with an officer, who wrote so busily at his desk that he seemed not to have even been aware of any one's presence; and this busy gentleman I afterwards discovered was General Patterson's Adjutant-General. Ii. I waited for half an hour, when I was informed that General Patterson was ready to see me. I found him seated at a table covered with papers, which stood in the middle of a large apartment filled with elegant furniture, and ornamented with a fine Brussels carpet. On the mantel-piece a marble clock ticked; in Gothic bookcases were long rows of richly bound volumes; the Federal commander had evidently selected his headquarters with an eye to comfort and convenience. He was a person of good figure and agreeable countenance; and wore the full-dress uniform of a Major-General of the U. S. Army. As I entered he rose, advanced a step, and offered me his hand. I am glad to make your acquaintance, Captain, he said; then he added with a smil
Paris (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.35
ours, and was about to pass over the very same ground almost without allowing him any rest. I galloped on toward Thoroughfare. My bay moved splendidly, and did not seem at all fatigued. He was moving with head up, and pulling at the rein. Good! My gallant bay! I said; if you go on at that rate we'll soon be there! I had not counted on the heat of the July weather, however; and when I got near Salem my bay began to flag a little. I pushed him with the spur, and hurried on. Near Paris he began to wheeze; but I pushed on, using the spur freely, and drove him up the mountain road, and along the gap to the river. This we forded, and in the midst of the terrible heat I hurried on over the turnpike. My bay had begun to pant and stagger at times; but there was no time to think of his condition. I had undertaken to deliver General Beauregard's message; and I must do so, on horseback or on foot, without loss of time. I dug the spur into my panting animal and rushed on.
Hainesville (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.35
gainst Patterson, with his headquarters at Winchester. Well, it was late in June, I think, when intelligence came that General Patterson was about to cross the Potomac at Williamsport, and Colonel Jackson was sent forward with the First Brigade, as it was then called, to support Stuart's cavalry, and feel the enemy, but not bring on a general engagement. This, the Colonel proceeded to do with alacrity, and he had soon advanced north of Martinsburg, and camped near the little village of Hainesville-Stuart continuing in front watching the enemy on the river. This was the state of things, when suddenly one morning we were aroused by the intelligence that Patterson had crossed his army; and Jackson immediately got his brigade under arms, intending to advance and attack him. He determined, however, to move forward first, with one regiment and a single gunand this he did, the regiment being the Fifth Virginia, Colonel Harper, with one piece from Pendleton's battery. I will not st
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