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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Gregg's cavalry at Gettysburg (search)
fect a surprise upon the enemy's rear. But Hampton's and Fitz Lee's brigades, which had been ordered to follow me, unfortuny's cavalry. Having been informed that Generals Hampton and Lee were up, I sent for them to come forward, so that I could shin finding General Hampton that he never reached me, and General Lee remained, as it was deemed inadvisable, at the time the iled the loss of valuable men. The left, where Hampton's and Lee's brigades were, by this time became heavily engaged as dism gallantly done, and about the same time a portion of General Fitz Lee's command charged on the left, the First Virginia Cavble, and determined to make the best fight possible. General Fitz Lee was always in the right place, and contributed his use new line, and sent, in compliance therewith, a brigade (Fitz Lee's) to Cashtown to protect our trains congregated there. harge of one of W. H. F. Lee's regiments and a portion of Fitz Lee's command, including the First Virginia Cavalry, as very
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Confederate negro enlistments. (search)
of two leading Confederates. Take another, from General Lee's life, to show the Caleb Balderstone sort of devand it remained in the dish untouched. Next day, General Lee, remembering the delicate tid-bit that had been sou, sar, but I'se ‘sponsible for de spoons, sar. General Lee's servant was responsible, in his own opinion, fog to the apathy and discontent of the people, and General Lee, it is now known, said the cause was lost unless lared in favor of the new policy, and a letter of General Lee's was published looking to the same end. In that It did not embody the views of Mr. Davis, nor of General Lee, nor of the Virginia Legislature. It was comparalar, since it was now well known in Richmond that General Lee had told the Virginia Legislature that, unless h March, and Richmond was evacuated on April 2d, while Lee's surrender took place on the 9th. The Confederate C is dated April 1st, when Sheridan had already forced Lee's lines. Mr. Lincoln, apparently, did not think much
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. (search)
ad carried provisions to Amelia Court-House for Lee's hard-pressed and hungry army; and, having bee869: In the morning of the 2d of April, General Lee saw his line broken at three points, at eac President Davis? When he had received news of Lee's defeat he had slunk from his pew in St. Paul'were sent to the rebel cruiser many days before Lee's lines were broken. It was thought that the pd in pursuance of this plan, they believed that Lee could avoid surrender only a short time longer.my, second in importance and numbers to that of Lee, yet unwilling to go further in the sequel and sident had clung, at Danville, to the hope that Lee might effect a retreat to Southwestern Virginia hope that it might not yield to the example of Lee's surrender, and that, under the inspiration ofemark drawing out no reply, I asked squarely if Lee had surrendered. Cobb still declined to answer it was wiser to be frank, he acknowledged that Lee's army had been defeated and compelled to surre[17 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
site sides of the river. In this situation General Lee, with the ultimate purpose of forcing an acutenant retraced his steps, and reported to General Lee as he was crossing the Rappahannock at Hinsr the night between that point and Orlean. General Lee made his headquarters at Prospect Hill, therrived at Salem, information was brought to General Lee that a body of the enemy's cavalry were appcolumns of McClellan, and delay his march until Lee could again interpose between the Federal army w the guard and let the prisoners go. When Fitz Lee returned to his position on the left flank oflry marched to Gettysburg, and took position on Lee's left, near Huntersville. They took part in ta particular house which had been marked on General Lee's diagram of the country, and furthermore tructed the advance of Grant's whole army, until Lee had time. to get his troops up from his line ol Railroad and James River canal. Returning to Lee's army, the Black Horse were occupied in arduou[40 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The mistakes of Gettysburg. (search)
nvasion of Pennsylvania was a movement that General Lee and his council agreed should be defensive ory that Meade's army was nearly double that of Lee. In my first article, I claimed that my trored, thinking that the whole or greater part of Lee's army had charged his position in the afternoo of heroes was really the onset of the whole of Lee's army. It is fair to presume, then, that, undardly possible that any one acquainted with General Lee's exalted character will accept such statemn going on. During the lull that succeeded, General Lee rode up to where I was and told me that he l examination of the ground, I rode back to General Lee, and reported that the position was very st advance soon halted and then withdrew. General Lee then recalled the question of an immediate ithout very severe loss, and I suggested to General Lee that the attack be postponed, and that we mant Adjutant General, and the other is from General Lee himself: headquarters army of Northern Vir[17 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The career of General A. P. Hill. (search)
liam E. Cameron. The numerous biographers of Lee and Jackson are, perhaps, responsible for the rn the Seven Days Fight around Richmond. General Lee had just succeeded Johnston in command of tenemy.--Hill's single division fought, says General Lee, with the impetuous courage for which that n under General Banks. About the same time General Lee detected the transfer of McClellan's forceshile Jackson hastened back to Sharpsburg, where Lee, with Longstreet and D. 11. Hill, was beset bys a major general closes. In May, 1863, General Lee formed three corps d'armee, from the troopsmander; his promotion came at the suggestion of Lee, who had long since taken his measure, and ascees of war called Longstreet and Ewell away from Lee, but Hill was ever at his side. Nor was the cointed. And it is memorable and remarkable that Lee and Jackson — the magnet and meteor of the Confeadfast patriot. In the paroxysm of death, General Lee called on Hill to move forward; and, when J[9 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Stonewall Jackson's Valley campaign. (search)
part of Virginia, west of the Alleghenies, and the subsequent efforts of Generals Floyd and Wise, and still later, of General Lee, availed only to prevent further encroachments of the enemy — not to regain the lost territory. When, therefore, G and that all the forces operating along the line of the Alleghenies, southwest of Winchester, and lately commanded by General Lee, should be concentrated under his command. This would have given him fifteen thousand or sixteen thousand men, the let. His own brigade was promptly sent to him, and one of the brigades of Loring's troops (General Loring had succeeded General Lee) reached him early in December. Subsequently two more brigades, under General Loring himself, were added, but all theof the mountains, with even a greatly superior force, was to risk defeat. On the 28th of April, Jackson applied to General Lee, then acting as commander-in-chief under President Davis, for a reinforcement of five thousand men, which addition to
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Baltimore riots. (search)
e Confederate service, was placed in command of the ununiformed volunteers, and took possession of the Northern Central Railroad depot, where a regular camp was established. A curious feature of the preparations for defense was the tender, on the part of several hundred colored men, of their services against the Yankees! The Mayor thanked them for the offer, and informed them that their services would be called for if required. Colonel Huger, of the regular army, afterward general under Lee, who had been for some time in command of the arsenal at Pikesville, a village near Baltimore, was in the city during all these troublous times, and, being a prime, social favorite of the young men about town, was approached for advice and assistance. The old colonel, who was decidedly Southern in his sympathies, and, in fact, went South shortly afterward, did a great deal to avert serious trouble. He was a splendid old fellow — a high liver, witty, good-humored, and a fine old-school offic
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