hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jefferson Davis 580 0 Browse Search
Fitz Lee 564 12 Browse Search
J. E. B. Stuart 485 5 Browse Search
George G. Meade 378 0 Browse Search
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) 319 1 Browse Search
Grant Ulysses Grant 308 0 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 288 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 268 2 Browse Search
Ewell 268 46 Browse Search
Billy Sherman 266 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure).

Found 21,060 total hits in 4,512 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
s of hard fighting, with varying successes that more than once threatened to turn against us, and the loss on our side would have been so much less that the pursuit of Lee's forces could have been made promptly and irresistibly. It is not, however, given to all men to be of the same spirit, and the three corps that were under Reynolds followed his orders in a very different way from that in which he always did his work. When he got Buford's demand for infantry support on the morning of the first, it was just what Reynolds expected, and with characteristic energy, he went forward, saw Buford, accepted at once the responsibility, and returning to find the leading division of the First Corps (Wadsworth's), took it in hand, brought it to the front, put it in position, renewed his orders for the rest of the corps, assigned the positions for the other divisions, sent for his other corps, urged their coming with the greatest speed, directed the point to be held by the reserve, renewed his
egiously imposed on. I have read the slip you send me twice carefully over; and if there is a single truth in it, outside of the great historical facts incidentally referred to, of the fall of Richmond and the surrender of General Lee, I have not discovered it. On the contrary, it is made up of statements which are utterly void of truth. I will call attention to some of them. The statement has been made by General Wilson, as it has been made in many other newspaper articles, that On the first Sunday in April, 1865, while seated in St. Paul's church, in Richmond, Jefferson Davis received a telegram from Lee announcing the fall of Petersburg, the partial destruction of his army, and the immediate necessity of flight. On that point I make this statement: On the Sunday referred to, I went by the War Department on my way to church. When at the department I was informed of two dispatches just received from General Lee, stating briefly the circumstances which made it necessary for hi
need for the presence of his troops at the front. As soon as the necessity for the concentration of the army was precipitated by the unexpected encounter, on the 1st of July, with a large force of the enemy, near Gettysburg, General Longstreet was urged to hasten his march; and this, perhaps, should have sufficed to cause him to push his divisions on toward Gettysburg, from which point he was distant but four miles, early on the 2d. But I cannot say that he was notified, on the night of the 1st, of the attack proposed to be made on the morning of the 2d, and the part his corps was to take therein. Neither do I think it just to charge that he was alone responsible for the delay in attacking that ensued after his arrival on the field. I well remember how General Lee was chafed by the non-appearance of the troops, until he finally became restless, and rode back to meet General Longstreet, and urge him forward; but, then, there was considerable delay in putting the troops to work afte
1st, first encountered the enemy in the vicinity of Gettysburg. How well his brigades of regulars and volunteers resisted the advance of that invading host, yielding only foot by foot, and so slowly as to give ample time for our infantry to go to his support, is well known to every one familiar with the history of the great battle. General Kilpatrick's division marched from Frederick well to the right, at Hanover engaged the enemy's cavalry in a sharp skirmish, and reached Gettysburg on the 1st, and on the left of our line, on the-3d, one of his brigades, led by General Farnsworth, gallantly charged the enemy's infantry, even to his line of defenses, and protected that flank from any attack, with the assistance of General Merritt's regular brigade. General Gregg's Division, having crossed the Potomac at Edwards' Ferry, in rear of our army, passed through Frederick, and, on the afternoon of July 1st, was at Hanover Junction, and reached Gettysburg on the morning of the 2d, taking pos
my on the east side of the mountains. On the morning of the 1st, General Lee and myself left his headquarters together, and large trains. When I left General Lee on the night of the 1st, I believed that he had made up his mind to attack, but was and the enemy's lowest. We had learned on the night of the 1st, from some prisoners captured near Seminary Ridge, that the rth, the success obtained by the accidental rencontre on the 1st, should have been vigorously prosecuted, and the enemy shoul time to fortify or concentrate. Fifth, on the night of the 1st, the army should have been carried around to Meade's right a As to Ewell's failure to prosecute the advantage won on the 1st, there is little to be said, as the commanding general was oI have said that I left General Lee late in the night of the 1st, and that he had not then determined when the attack should that I issued to the heads of departments in my corps on the 1st. I present the order as issued to Colonel Walton, of the ar
How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. Major General James Harrison Wilson. On the first Sunday of April, 1865, while seated in St. Paul's Church, in Richmond, Jefferson Davis received a telegram from Lee, announcing the fall of Petersburg, the partial destruction of his army, and the immediate necessity for flight. Although he could not have been entirely unprepared for this intelligence, it appears that he did not receive it with self-possession or dignity; but with tremulous and nervous haste, like a weak man in the hour of misfortune, he left the house of worship and hurried home, where he and his personal staff and servants spent the rest of the day in packing their personal baggage. At nightfall everything was in readiness; even the gold then remaining in the Treasury, not exceeding in all forty thousand dollars, was packed among the baggage, In a recent article Mr. Reagan says: If it is meant by this statement simply that the money in the Treasury (gold and all) was tak
ished for pursuit pell-mell; fifth, the army should have been carried around to Meade's right and rear on the night of the 1st, and placed between him and his capital, and thus forced him to attack us, as he certainly intended doing; sixth, when I anged the result for the better. Let us briefly review the situation on the morning of the 2d. During the night of the 1st, General Sickles rested with the Third Corps upon the ground lying between General Hancock's left and Round Top, General Gk. The battle should not have been made under the circumstances. We should have drawn everything up on the night of the 1st, and made a quick move by our right flank on the morning of the 2d, so as to seize the Emmettsburg road. Had we done thisowever, no decisive result had followed immediately upon the flank movement that should have been made on the night of the 1st, or the morning of the 2d, the thirteen days that elapsed between our first rencontre and our recrossing of the Potomac wo
ral Meade, without waiting to hear from Hancock, issued orders to the Fifth and Twelfth Corps to proceed to the scene of action. At 6.30 P. M. he received the first report from General Hancock, in which that officer said: We can fight here, as the ground appears not unfavorable, with good troops. General Meade at once issued orders to all his corps commanders to move to Gettysburg, broke up his headquarters at Taneytown, and proceeded himself to the field, arriving there at one A. M. of the 2d. He was occupied during the night in directing the movements of the troops, and as soon as it was daylight, he proceeded to inspect the position occupied, and to make arrangements for posting the several corps as they should arrive. By seven A. M. the Second and Fifth Corps, with the rest of the Third, had reached the ground, and soon after the whole army was in position, with the exception of the Sixth Corps, which arrived at two P. M. after a long and fatiguing march. General Sedgwick say
the enemy's right with the dawn of day on the second. The divisions of Major Generals Early and Ro to begin the movement at an early hour on the second. He instructed General Ewell to be prepared tion during the day, and joined about noon on the 2d. Previous to his joining I received instructions Brigade joined its division, about noon on the 2d. In this, General Longstreet clearly admits thaoint he was distant but four miles, early on the 2d. But I cannot say that he was notified, on the attack proposed to be made on the morning of the 2d, and the part his corps was to take therein. Neral Lee but anticipated his early arrival on the 2d, and based his calculations upon it. I have showear the battle-field during the afternoon of the 2d, was ordered to attack the next morning; and Gens upon our extreme left, during the night of the 2d, ordered him forward early the next morning. In decided advantage gained by Longstreet on the second, the failure of the operations of the third da
burg on the 1st, and on the left of our line, on the-3d, one of his brigades, led by General Farnsworth, gallantly charged the enemy's infantry, even to his line of defenses, and protected that flank from any attack, with the assistance of General Merritt's regular brigade. General Gregg's Division, having crossed the Potomac at Edwards' Ferry, in rear of our army, passed through Frederick, and, on the afternoon of July 1st, was at Hanover Junction, and reached Gettysburg on the morning of the 2d, taking position on the right of our line. On the 3d, during that terrific fire of artillery, which preceded the gallant but unsuccessful assault of Pickett's Division on our line, it was discovered that Stuart's cavalry was moving to our right, with the evident intention of passing to the rear, to make a simultaneous attack there. What the consequence of the success of this movement would have been, the merest tyro in the art of war will understand. When opposite our right, Stuart was met
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...