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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure).

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Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 1
obliterate recollections of virtue in each other's foes, and direct all the agencies of power to color the causes and events of the war to harmonize with the prejudices which ruled North and South. It was to correct as far as possible the pages of the future history of the war of the late rebellion, that the contributions herein given were solicited, and they have all been written with the view of attaining that purpose. Already many of the leading actors of the war have passed away. Lincoln fell by the assassin's hand just when he had achieved the final victory for the Union, lamented by those who were then his foes as keenly as by the loyal men who so bravely sustained him; and of his original cabinet but two members survive. Stanton, the great War Minister, has gone to his final account; Mead and Lee, who met the shock of decisive battle at Gettysburg, now sleep in the City of the silent; and hundreds of others, who were conspicuous in civil councils and on the sanguinary f
y, make them the noblest people of the earth. The sword has been sheathed between the North and the South; the banners of the Blue and of the Gray have been furled; the dead of the conflict have sacred sepulchre; flowers bloom for the now peaceful warriors as they sleep side by side in their mingled dust; monuments dot the hillsides and plains where the battle once raged, telling of the matchless heroism of American soldiers. Federal and Confederate chieftains sit in the same Senate and House as national lawmakers; in the same cabinet of Presidential advisers, and heroes of both armies represent the reunited Republic in foreign lands. Peace has spread her silver wings over the desolation and bereavements of the terrible conflict, and Liberty and Law are the declared attributes of free government for all classes, conditions and races amongst us. Of such a country and such a people the truth of history must be the grandest eulogy, and The annals of the War will be the most welcome
James Longstreet (search for this): chapter 1
ndpoints, they, of necessity, often proffer antagonistic conclusions; but the freedom of expression from the opposing heroes, has enabled the intelligent and impartial student to arrive as nearly at the exact truth as history can ever attain. The Confederate story of the battle of Gettysburg has never been accurately given to the world until it was done by the various contributions to The Philadelphia weekly times, and now herein reproduced, commencing with the exhaustive narrative of General Longstreet. That publication has led to a multitude of explanatory articles from the highest Southern military authorities, until the whole truth is now, for the first time, presented for the future historian of the war.. Nor do The annals of the War limit their interest to the details of military history, the manoeuvres of armies, or the mere achievements of the sword. They present the most entertaining and instructive chapters of many of the countless incidents of a great war, which will
utions herein given were solicited, and they have all been written with the view of attaining that purpose. Already many of the leading actors of the war have passed away. Lincoln fell by the assassin's hand just when he had achieved the final victory for the Union, lamented by those who were then his foes as keenly as by the loyal men who so bravely sustained him; and of his original cabinet but two members survive. Stanton, the great War Minister, has gone to his final account; Mead and Lee, who met the shock of decisive battle at Gettysburg, now sleep in the City of the silent; and hundreds of others, who were conspicuous in civil councils and on the sanguinary field, are in their eternal rest. Official sources of reliable information have perished in a multitude of instances, and the country is to-day without a single trustworthy history of the greatest struggle in the records of any modern civilization. The annals of the War furnish the most valuable contributions to the fu
Benjamin Stanton (search for this): chapter 1
f the future history of the war of the late rebellion, that the contributions herein given were solicited, and they have all been written with the view of attaining that purpose. Already many of the leading actors of the war have passed away. Lincoln fell by the assassin's hand just when he had achieved the final victory for the Union, lamented by those who were then his foes as keenly as by the loyal men who so bravely sustained him; and of his original cabinet but two members survive. Stanton, the great War Minister, has gone to his final account; Mead and Lee, who met the shock of decisive battle at Gettysburg, now sleep in the City of the silent; and hundreds of others, who were conspicuous in civil councils and on the sanguinary field, are in their eternal rest. Official sources of reliable information have perished in a multitude of instances, and the country is to-day without a single trustworthy history of the greatest struggle in the records of any modern civilization.
e contributions herein given were solicited, and they have all been written with the view of attaining that purpose. Already many of the leading actors of the war have passed away. Lincoln fell by the assassin's hand just when he had achieved the final victory for the Union, lamented by those who were then his foes as keenly as by the loyal men who so bravely sustained him; and of his original cabinet but two members survive. Stanton, the great War Minister, has gone to his final account; Mead and Lee, who met the shock of decisive battle at Gettysburg, now sleep in the City of the silent; and hundreds of others, who were conspicuous in civil councils and on the sanguinary field, are in their eternal rest. Official sources of reliable information have perished in a multitude of instances, and the country is to-day without a single trustworthy history of the greatest struggle in the records of any modern civilization. The annals of the War furnish the most valuable contributions t
January, 1879 AD (search for this): chapter 1
the banners of the Blue and of the Gray have been furled; the dead of the conflict have sacred sepulchre; flowers bloom for the now peaceful warriors as they sleep side by side in their mingled dust; monuments dot the hillsides and plains where the battle once raged, telling of the matchless heroism of American soldiers. Federal and Confederate chieftains sit in the same Senate and House as national lawmakers; in the same cabinet of Presidential advisers, and heroes of both armies represent the reunited Republic in foreign lands. Peace has spread her silver wings over the desolation and bereavements of the terrible conflict, and Liberty and Law are the declared attributes of free government for all classes, conditions and races amongst us. Of such a country and such a people the truth of history must be the grandest eulogy, and The annals of the War will be the most welcome of eulogiums, because the most faithful record of their achievements. A. K. M. Philadelphia, January, 1879.
an say of the expedition, as to its futility, barrenness and general worthlessness, of which we were conscious and heartily tired long before we saw the end of it. The battle of Beverly Ford, as we call it, or of Fleetwood, as General Stuart styled it, is interesting in the first place, because it was the first occasion when the cavalry of the Army of the Potomac went into action as a body. The cavalry had been organized by General Hooker into a corps under Stoneman during the winter of 1862-63, and Stoneman had commanded the greater part of it as a unit in the field during his celebrated but entirely fruitless raid in the Chancellorsville campaign; but there had been no fighting-simply long marches in rain and mud, and much loss of sleep. General Stoneman, naturally of an anxious habit of mind, was unfitted by temperament, as well as by bodily suffering, for independent operations remote from the main army. After the return from the raid he was unjustly held to blame for a sha
Old Joe Hooker (search for this): chapter 10
the Potomac went into action as a body. The cavalry had been organized by General Hooker into a corps under Stoneman during the winter of 1862-63, and Stoneman hadappahannock that day was in fact a reconnoissance in force to ascertain for General Hooker's information to what extent the rumors were true that Lee was en route acrlue Ridge to the Shenandoah Valley, and so no doubt to the Potomac and beyond. Hooker's army was in the old camps opposite Fredericksburg, to which he had retired af Pleasonton at St. James' Church, all that was necessary to the purposes of General Hooker had been fully accomplished; the information required had been secured withattle of Beverly ford were manifold. It provided information which enabled General Hooker to move in good time to keep pace with Lee's army of invasion en route to Mof Aldie, Mliddleburg and Upperville, on the 17th, 19th and 21st of June, until Hooker's main army, followed by our cavalry, was north of the river, causing subsequen
Wade Hampton (search for this): chapter 10
, with ammunition and rations nearly expended. We voluntarily withdrew from Hampton's front, and withdrew at night as a matter of common discretion; but we remained within easy reach of his lines the next day, and went comfortably into camp. Day after day, through the heat and dust, camping regularly at night, we continued our long march to James river, hampered with weary and foot-sore prisoners, and a long train of wagons and carts, mostly filled with wounded; but we went unvexed by General Hampton until he came again close under the wing of Lee's army. We regard the two days fight as a drawn battle, and we think there is something rather fine in the aspect of our troopers stalking through so many miles of hostile territory directly afterward, unimpeded by the enemy's cavalry, who were close at hand, and had us somewhat at a disadvantage. But we freely admit anything that anybody can say of the expedition, as to its futility, barrenness and general worthlessness, of which we wer
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