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John Buford (search for this): chapter 28
eneral Stoneman, the division commanders being Generals Pleasonton, Buford, Averill, and D. McM. Gregg. Soon after this organization was mademonious visit to our neighbors opposite. On Monday evening, General John Buford, with his two brigades and light batteries, and a small suppt nine thousand cavalry. At daylight, on Tuesday, June 9th, General Buford, with his regular and volunteer brigades crossed the Rappahannotructions met in the roads, he did not reach until some hours after Buford's attack had been made. Upon an open plain, his brigades, led by Cgain reorganized in two divisions, commanded respectively by Generals John Buford and D. McM. Gregg, and to each division were attached two lideadly fire of the carbines of the pursuers. Later in the day, General Buford's Division came in on the right and took the enemy in flank; thdivision, the command of which was given to General Kilpatrick. General Buford, with his division, in advance of our army, on July 1st, first
Farnsworth (search for this): chapter 28
igades of regulars and volunteers resisted the advance of that invading host, yielding only foot by foot, and so slowly as to give ample time for our infantry to go to his support, is well known to every one familiar with the history of the great battle. General Kilpatrick's division marched from Frederick well to the right, at Hanover engaged the enemy's cavalry in a sharp skirmish, and reached Gettysburg on the 1st, and on the left of our line, on the-3d, one of his brigades, led by General Farnsworth, gallantly charged the enemy's infantry, even to his line of defenses, and protected that flank from any attack, with the assistance of General Merritt's regular brigade. General Gregg's Division, having crossed the Potomac at Edwards' Ferry, in rear of our army, passed through Frederick, and, on the afternoon of July 1st, was at Hanover Junction, and reached Gettysburg on the morning of the 2d, taking position on the right of our line. On the 3d, during that terrific fire of artiller
Wesley Merritt (search for this): chapter 28
ce was through a rough, wooded country, which afforded the enemy every defensive advantage, but his regiments, led by such soldiers as Colonel Davis, of the Eighth New York (killed in the action), Major Morris, of the Sixth Pennsylvania, and Captain Merritt, of the Second Regulars, and others of like character, were not to be stopped by ordinary resistance; and by their repeated mounted charges, and advances as dismounted skirmishers, the enemy was driven back to a line strongly held by a largeysburg on the 1st, and on the left of our line, on the-3d, one of his brigades, led by General Farnsworth, gallantly charged the enemy's infantry, even to his line of defenses, and protected that flank from any attack, with the assistance of General Merritt's regular brigade. General Gregg's Division, having crossed the Potomac at Edwards' Ferry, in rear of our army, passed through Frederick, and, on the afternoon of July 1st, was at Hanover Junction, and reached Gettysburg on the morning of th
I. Irvin Gregg (search for this): chapter 28
ory is repeated. Our cavalry was again reorganized in two divisions, commanded respectively by Generals John Buford and D. McM. Gregg, and to each division were attached two light batteries. Everything necessary was done in preparation for an active campaign. The division formerly commanded by General Averill (who had been transferred to another field) was consolidated with Gregg's, and the new division was named the second; an additional brigade was formed in it, commanded by Colonel I. Irvin Gregg, the other two being commanded respectively by General Kilpatrick and Colonel McIntosh. The two divisions were soon put in motion toward the Potomac, but did not take exactly the same route, and the Army of the Potomac followed their lead. The major part of the rebel army, having moved in advance, entered the Shenandoah Valley by the passes of the Blue Ridge, either for the purpose of masking the movements of the rebel infantry, or else to discover the whereabouts of and to impede
dred is killed, wounded, and missing; of the latter, there were but few. The enemy's loss was much greater, particularly in prisoners. Our captures also included light guns, flags, and small-arms. The Army of the Potomac, moving in pursuit of Lee, was required to protect itself on one side from any possible attack of the enemy, and to extend its protection, on the other side, to Washington. These successful engagements of our cavalry left our infantry free to march, without the loss of anto the details of the fight, it need only be added, that Stuart advanced not a pace beyond where he was met; but after a severe struggle, which was only terminated by the darkness of night, he withdrew, and on the morrow, with the defeated army of Lee, was in retreat to the Potomac. Thus has been outlined the services of the cavalry of the Army of the Potomac, during the Gettysburg campaign. No period of its history is more glorious, nor more fondly dwelt upon by those who were for a long
D. M'M. Gregg (search for this): chapter 28
The Union cavalry at Gettysburg. Major General D. M'M. Gregg. In considering the importance of the part taken by the cavalry of the Army of the Potomac, in the Gettysburg campaign, it will not be amiss to refer briefly to the circumstances under which the volunteer cavalry was organized, and the difficulties and hindrances which were met, and had to be overcome, in bringing it to the high state of efficiency that characterized it at the opening of that campaign. During the fall of 1861, and the winter following, there had been established in camps about Washington, regiments of men with horses, intended for the volunteer cavalry service. These regiments had been formed hastily by uniting companies of men from different parts of the same State, and after this the organization was completed by the appointment of the field officers by the Governor of the State. . Naturally enough, very many improper appointments were made, and the result was the failure of many of the regiments t
younger Lees, had from the onset been very efficient. It was composed of the best blood of the South-officers and enlisted men had been accustomed all their lives to the use of fire-arms, and were well practiced in horsemanship. Its strength had not been frittered away in petty details, but preserved for the heavy blows which it, from time to time, inflicted on our lines of communication, and means of transportation. General Hooker organized his cavalry into a corps, commanded by General Stoneman, the division commanders being Generals Pleasonton, Buford, Averill, and D. McM. Gregg. Soon after this organization was made, the cavalry, save a part detained to take part in the battle of Chancellorsville (where it did distinguished service), left the lines of the army on what is known as the Stoneman raid. Without considering at all the material results of that raid, which, if not so great as expected, were lessened by the adverse issue of the battle in which our army engaged at C
D. McM. Gregg (search for this): chapter 28
an, the division commanders being Generals Pleasonton, Buford, Averill, and D. McM. Gregg. Soon after this organization was made, the cavalry, save a part detained l supporting column of infantry, moved to the vicinity of Beverly Ford, and General Gregg, with his own and Colonel Duffie's divisions, and light batteries, moved tone strongly held by a large number of field-pieces supported by troops. General Gregg, with his own and Colonel Dufie's command, crossed at the same time at Kelmmander, Colonel Dufie proceeded at once to Stevensburg to take position, while Gregg marched directly upon Brandy Station, which, owing to the number of miles to beanized in two divisions, commanded respectively by Generals John Buford and D. McM. Gregg, and to each division were attached two light batteries. Everything necesseral Averill (who had been transferred to another field) was consolidated with Gregg's, and the new division was named the second; an additional brigade was formed
John B. McIntosh (search for this): chapter 28
ed to another field) was consolidated with Gregg's, and the new division was named the second; an additional brigade was formed in it, commanded by Colonel I. Irvin Gregg, the other two being commanded respectively by General Kilpatrick and Colonel McIntosh. The two divisions were soon put in motion toward the Potomac, but did not take exactly the same route, and the Army of the Potomac followed their lead. The major part of the rebel army, having moved in advance, entered the Shenandoah Vallmake a simultaneous attack there. What the consequence of the success of this movement would have been, the merest tyro in the art of war will understand. When opposite our right, Stuart was met by General Gregg, with two of his brigades (Colonels McIntosh and Irvin Gregg), and Custer's Brigade of the Third Division, and, on a fair field, there was another trial between two cavalry forces, in which most of the fighting was done in the saddle, and with the trooper's favorite weapon — the sabr
J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 28
lement of that grand army. The rebel cavalry under Stuart, and his lieutenants, the younger Lees, had from the forces confronting on the river. The strength of Stuart's command at this time was subsequently ascertained Wyndham, fell upon the enemy so furiously that General Stuart's headquarters were captured. There were no rend to impede the march of our army. The advance of Stuart's command had reached Aldie, and here, on June 17thdecided successes for us, and terminated in driving Stuart's cavalry through the gap at Paris. On June 17the division advanced to Middleburg, where a part of Stuart's force was posted, and was attacked by Colonel Irvkett's Division on our line, it was discovered that Stuart's cavalry was moving to our right, with the evidentt of war will understand. When opposite our right, Stuart was met by General Gregg, with two of his brigades e details of the fight, it need only be added, that Stuart advanced not a pace beyond where he was met; but af
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