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Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
When Jackson was disabled, and Stuart assumed command, and sent to ascertain Jackson's views and wishes as to the attack on the next morning, the wounded commander to be sufficient to make the reputation of any soldier. Stuart's attack with Jackson's Corps on the next morning fully justified this confidence. His employment on the preceding December, the same masterly handling of his guns had protected Jackson's right toward the Massaponnax, which was the real key of the battle; and in t one of his favorite ballads. This eccentric habit attracted the attention of Jackson's men at Chancellorsville-men habituated to the gravity and prayers of their wounded leader. Stuart led Jackson's Corps against General Hooker's intrenchments, with drawn sabre and floating plume, singing Old Joe Hooker, will you come out of cers, Stuart passed the long months of the winter succeeding the hard battle. Jackson's quarters were at Moss neck, some miles down the river, and they exchanged vi
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 49
sure that he loved fighting in person, from the ardor of his blood, his high health, and natural excitability and impetuosity. He would certainly have made an excellent private, and told me, when there was some question of virtually superseding him, that, if they did so, he would enlist. The War Office might deprive him of his commission, he said, or force him to resign; but there was one thing they could not do-prevent him from going into the ranks with his sabre as a private of the Confederate States army, which, he added, he certainly should do. I am certain that he would have followed this course at once, and not in the least from any feeling of spite. He produced upon me the impression of being more thoroughly and completely devoted to the cause in which he was fighting than any other person, without exception, with whom I was thrown during the war. His faith in the justice of the struggle was absolute, and he never, to my knowledge, had one moment's doubt as to the result of t
North America (search for this): chapter 49
to battle with a camp song on his lips; here to-day and away to-morrow, raiding, fighting, laughing, dancing, and as famous for his gallantry toward women as for his reckless courage. Stuart was in every particular a singular and striking human being, drawing to himself the strongest public interest both as a man and a soldier. Of his military ability as a cavalry leader, General Sedgwick probably summed up the general opinion when he said: Stuart is the best cavalryman ever foaled in North America. Of his courage, devotion, and many lovable traits, General Lee bore his testimony on his death, when he retired to his tent with the words: I can scarcely think of him without weeping. Stuart thus made a very strong impression both on the people at large and on the eminent soldiers with whom he was associated, and a sketch of him ought to interest, if faithfully drawn. The writer of this paper believes it is in his power to present such a sketch, having enjoyed his personal friendshi
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
the instinctive power of penetrating his enemy's design, an eye consummate in the choice of ground for fighting on, with cavalry, infantry, or artillery; and, while reckless, apparently, in attacking, knew well when he ought to retreat. The success of his retreats, indeed, from positions of the most hazardous character, will probably remain his greatest claim to good soldiership-at least they so impressed me while closely observing how they were accomplished on many occasions in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. His personal bearing on the field was peculiar. He was rarely excited by anything, though he exhibited all the ardor of a young soldier while actually fighting, and often crossed swords like a common sabieur. As frequently, however, he remained quiet, appearing to be indulging in reflection. In very dangerous and critical situations I have seen him throw his leg over the pommel of the saddle, drum upon his knee carelessly, and then give his orders so quietly that it
Bucklands (Nevada, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
rations of 1863, culminating at Gettysburg, he was charged with misconception or disobedience of orders in separating himself from the main column, although he protested to me, with the utmost earnestness and feeling, that he had been guilty of neither. Then the hurried and adventurous scenes followed, when General Lee attempted, in October, 1863, to cut off General Meade at Manassas, when the cavalry was the only arm which effected anything, and General Kilpatrick was nearly crushed near Bucklands — the brief campaign of Mine Run-and the furious wrestle between Lee and Grant in the Wilderness, in May, 1864. When General Grant moved toward Spottsylvania Court-House, it was Stuart who, according to Northern historians, so obstructed the roads as to enable General Lee to interpose his army at this important point. Had this not been effected, Richmond, it would seem, must have fallen; Stuart thus having the melancholy glory of prolonging, for an additional year, the contest, ending on
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
s possible to the original. Up to the outbreak of the war Stuart's life was scarcely marked by any incident of interest. He was a native of Patrick county, Virginia, and came of a family of high social position and some distinction. Having graduated at West Point, he served for some years as a lieutenant in the United States army, and when it was obvious that Virginia would secede, he resigned his commission and came to his native State, where he was put in command of the First Regiment of Cavalry,operating on the Upper Potomac. He had been prominent, at this time, in only one scene attracting public attention. This was in 1859, at Harper's Ferry,will probably remain his greatest claim to good soldiership-at least they so impressed me while closely observing how they were accomplished on many occasions in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. His personal bearing on the field was peculiar. He was rarely excited by anything, though he exhibited all the ardor of a young
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
onnax, which was the real key of the battle; and in these two great actions, as on the left at Sharpsburg, Stuart exhibited a genius for the management of artillery which would have delighted Napoleon. In the operations of 1863, culminating at Gettysburg, he was charged with misconception or disobedience of orders in separating himself from the main column, although he protested to me, with the utmost earnestness and feeling, that he had been guilty of neither. Then the hurried and adventuroused with and trusted to him. The cavalry, under their ardent young leader, were the eyes and ears of his army in every campaign; and although Lee would not officially censure Stuart, it seems plain that, right or wrong, he regarded the defeat at Gettysburg as in some measure due to the absence of Stuart, to whom he had always looked for prompt and reliable information of the movements of the enemy. Finally, when Stuart fell, in May, 1864, and Lee said that he could scarcely think of him without
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
knight of the days of chivalry; and at the head of his troopers, as they moved through the spring forests, he was a romantic figure. When Johnston crossed the mountains, Stuart covered the movement with very great skill, charged the Zouaves at Manassas, held the outposts afterward toward Alexandria, and brought up the rear when Johnston fell back to the Rapidan, subsequently taking a prominent part in the obstinate battles on the Chickahominy. Just preceding these battles he made his remarkabe main column, although he protested to me, with the utmost earnestness and feeling, that he had been guilty of neither. Then the hurried and adventurous scenes followed, when General Lee attempted, in October, 1863, to cut off General Meade at Manassas, when the cavalry was the only arm which effected anything, and General Kilpatrick was nearly crushed near Bucklands — the brief campaign of Mine Run-and the furious wrestle between Lee and Grant in the Wilderness, in May, 1864. When General Gr
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
The writer of this paper believes it is in his power to present such a sketch, having enjoyed his personal friendship, and observed him during a large part of his career; and the aim will be to make the likeness presented as accurate as possible to the original. Up to the outbreak of the war Stuart's life was scarcely marked by any incident of interest. He was a native of Patrick county, Virginia, and came of a family of high social position and some distinction. Having graduated at West Point, he served for some years as a lieutenant in the United States army, and when it was obvious that Virginia would secede, he resigned his commission and came to his native State, where he was put in command of the First Regiment of Cavalry,operating on the Upper Potomac. He had been prominent, at this time, in only one scene attracting public attention. This was in 1859, at Harper's Ferry, where he was directed by General, then Colonel, R. E. Lee to summon John Brown to surrender. He rec
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
, he resigned his commission and came to his native State, where he was put in command of the First Regiment of Cavalry,operating on the Upper Potomac. He had been prominent, at this time, in only one scene attracting public attention. This was in 1859, at Harper's Ferry, where he was directed by General, then Colonel, R. E. Lee to summon John Brown to surrender. He recognized Brown, then passing as Captain Smith, as soon as the engine-house door was half opened, as an old acquaintance in Kansas, and advised him to surrender, which Brown declined doing, adding, You know, lieutenant, we are not afraid of bullets, when Stuart stepped aside, and the attack and capture of the old marauder followed. In a sketch so limited as the present, it is impossible to more than refer to the main points in Stuart's career as a soldier. From the first, his cavalry operations were full of fire and vigor, and General J. E. Johnston, under whom he served in the Valley, called him the indefatigable
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