hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jefferson Davis 580 0 Browse Search
Fitz Lee 564 12 Browse Search
J. E. B. Stuart 485 5 Browse Search
George G. Meade 378 0 Browse Search
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) 319 1 Browse Search
Grant Ulysses Grant 308 0 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 288 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 268 2 Browse Search
Ewell 268 46 Browse Search
Billy Sherman 266 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). Search the whole document.

Found 427 total hits in 90 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
B. N. Harrison (search for this): chapter 50
attack was meditated-believed they were only present to watch our movements; said news had been received that evening that Buell would join us in forty-eight hours, and then we would advance on Corinth. General Sherman's positive manner of uttering his opinions had the effect to quiet the apprehensions of some of the officers present, but others were not satisfied. The principal officers of the Third and Fourth Brigades, and Fifth Ohio Cavalry, commanded by a son-in-law of the late President Harrison, were convinced that attack was at hand. Letters written that night by officers could be produced to show the feeling pervading the camp of the Seventy-seventh Ohio. Thus stood matters on that eventful Saturday night. Colonel Hildebrand and myself occupied the same tent; it stood adjacent the primitive little church which was destined to fill so important a page in our country's annals. Colonel Hildebrand, not feeling well, retired early, but I remained up late writing letters, and
Breckenridge (search for this): chapter 50
to Lick creek on the right, a distance of about three miles, supported by the third and the reserve. The first line was commanded by General Hardee, supported by General Bragg; the second line by Generals Bragg and Polk, and the third by General Breckenridge. These lines were separated from five to eight hundred yards. General Beauregard was on the left, General Johnston on the right. Standing in front of Shiloh chapel, looking down into the dark wood from which issued the deep roar of heavye Confederates had fallen, for Albert Sidney Johnston was as great a military genius as the country has produced. His death was caused by a Minnie ball severing the femoral artery at about half-past 2 o'clock. This was a most critical point. Breckenridge's reserves had been ordered up. Johnston said: I will lead these Kentuckians and Tennesseeans into the fight, and, waving his sword, pressed forward to take a certain position, which they did gain-but their brave leader was gone! The death of
Crittenden (search for this): chapter 50
ed our tent that Sabbath night. He says: I established my headquarters at the church at Shiloh, in the enemy's encampment, etc. His dispatches were written on a desk in one of the Union tents. Our tent was the only one thus provided. These facts are mentioned as not of much historical importance, but simply as incidents of the day. It was known through all of Sunday that General Buell was hurrying on with all possible dispatch. That officer, with two of his corps commanders, Nelson and Crittenden, had reached General Grant's headquarters on the hill at the river by half-past 4 o'clock. An hour after, portions of their commands had crossed, and were clilmbing the steep river banks to take part in the last desperate struggle of Sunday. The appearance of Buell's advance, in the dark hours of that terrible Sabbath afternoon, was a spectacle the most inspiriting that despairing men ever looked upon. As they filed across the broad bottoms of the Tennessee, with colors flying, and fill
ome importance, in a military view, by the Confederates, for after the fall of Donelson they erected a battery on the high bluff overlooking the landing, and General Cheatham occupied Shiloh as a military camp. The country is undulating table-land, the bluffs rising to the height of one hundred and fifty feet above the alluviahousand men, and constituted the fighting material of the Confederate army, commanded by the most experienced officers-Johnston, Beauregard, Bragg, Hardee, Polk, Cheatham, Breckenridge-and a long list of subordinate commanders, presenting an array of names that ought to infuse confidence in any army. With their united forces it w God's first temples. The church at Shiloh had two doors and one window, which was without glass. Of pulpit and seats none were visible, as the Confederate General Cheatham had removed them for camp use previous to our occupancy. Before the battle the flooring boards were being rapidly converted into coffins for Union soldiers.
Samuel Nelson (search for this): chapter 50
lieve, occupied our tent that Sabbath night. He says: I established my headquarters at the church at Shiloh, in the enemy's encampment, etc. His dispatches were written on a desk in one of the Union tents. Our tent was the only one thus provided. These facts are mentioned as not of much historical importance, but simply as incidents of the day. It was known through all of Sunday that General Buell was hurrying on with all possible dispatch. That officer, with two of his corps commanders, Nelson and Crittenden, had reached General Grant's headquarters on the hill at the river by half-past 4 o'clock. An hour after, portions of their commands had crossed, and were clilmbing the steep river banks to take part in the last desperate struggle of Sunday. The appearance of Buell's advance, in the dark hours of that terrible Sabbath afternoon, was a spectacle the most inspiriting that despairing men ever looked upon. As they filed across the broad bottoms of the Tennessee, with colors fly
Wills Hass (search for this): chapter 50
The battle of Shiloh. Colonel Wills De Hass. The 6th of April, 1862, was a day fraught with momentous issues for the future of the American Republic. The evening of the 5th had witnessed the concentration of a great army, whose leaders had boastingly declared in the pride of their strength should, on the coming morn, overwhelm and destroy the army of the Union which lay encamped in conscious security around the wilderness church of Shiloh! At no period during our prolonged and sanguinary civil war was the Union more imperiled than on that eventful Saturday evening. The battle of Shiloh was the first decisive and, pre-eminently, the most important of the war. Defeat then would have been the greatest disaster that could have befallen the arms of the Union. The country can never know the full danger of that hour, and the pen of the historian can never portray the peril which hung over the Army of the Tennessee. Congress received the announcement of events then culminating in pr
eneral Sherman to cut a road from Owl creek, in front of the church, to an old cotton-field, three-fourths of a mile east of our camp. The creek was securely bridged, and the road cut of sufficient width to admit the passage of our army on its anticipated march to Corinth! About two o'clock P. M., Colonel Jesse Hildebrand, commanding Third Brigade, Sherman's Division, to which my regiment was attached, invited me to accompany Colonel Buckland, commanding Fourth Brigade, same division, Colonel Cockerel, Seventieth Ohio Volunteers, and one or two other officers, on a short reconnoissance. We had not advanced half a mile from camp when we were met by squads of the fatigue party sent out to cut the road, with the startling intelligence that the rebel cavalry were in considerable force in the wood immediately across the old cotton-field. Our pickets extended to the line of the field. We rode to a position commanding the wood referred to, and with a glass saw the enemy in considerable f
ts as thick as they could ride. I ordered the men to up and fire, which order had scarcely been executed when the entire line was ridden down, the men sabred and shot by a force ten times superior to our own. The dash was one of the boldest of the war, and the loss sustained over one-third of my command. The promptness of Colonel Hildebrand, in ordering up the other regiments of his brigade, I think saved the day, and the commanding general and staff from capture. An officer of his staff (McCoy) was ridden down, and, as General Sherman assured me, he narrowly escaped. I regard this statement due the memory of a brave and meritorious officer. The dead were buried on the spot; the wounded removed to camp; the rebel camp destroyed, with a large amount of property, and this was the last of the fighting at Shiloh. The losses sustained by both armies exceeded the frightful number of twenty-five thousand men. Four years after the battle, a writer, visiting Shiloh and Corinth, gave a
P. G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 50
rge of a volcano. It was expected, says General Beauregard, we should be able to reach the enemy's break General A. Sidney Johnston said to General Beauregard: Can it be possible they are not aware os father.] The united armies of Johnston and Beauregard numbered about fifty thousand men, and constir united forces it was determined, says General Beauregard in his report, to assume the offensive, ines of battle. The first, according to General Beauregard's report, extended from Owl creek on thearated from five to eight hundred yards. General Beauregard was on the left, General Johnston on theand prepare for the next assault. It came. Beauregard, concentrating all his energies in the momenvance is ordered. The shattered brigades of Beauregard enter the ravine and close up on the contracnatural barriers, prevented the execution of Beauregard and Bragg's humane orders! Gradually the fiby noon a signal victory had been achieved. Beauregard withdrew his forces in good order, and pursu[7 more...]
Generals McClernand (search for this): chapter 50
The division of General Lew Wallace was landed at Crump's, four miles above Savannah, and the other five divisions of McClernand, Smith, Hurlbut, Sherman, and Prentiss, disembarked at Pittsburg Landing, which consisted of a warehouse, grocery, andlows: General Sherman occupied the extreme front at Shiloh church; Generals Prentiss and Hurlbut lay on the left-; Generals McClernand and W. H. L. Wallace on the right and rear. The form of4he encampment was a semi-circle with its greater arc on t three of Waterhouse's guns captured, the line near Sherman's headquarters was enfiladed and driven back in confusion. McClernand promptly supported Sherman, but seeing the flanking movement of Hardee, I was ordered to hurry up reinforcements. Meetfforts; General Sherman particularly distinguished himself, and by his presence and bravery greatly inspirited the men. McClernand, Hurlbut, and others did effective service. General Prentiss, who was captured with part of his division, contended br
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9