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Jesse Hildebrand (search for this): chapter 50
pated march to Corinth! About two o'clock P. M., Colonel Jesse Hildebrand, commanding Third Brigade, Sherman's Division, tohe advance of the reconnoitering parties. The officers (Hildebrand and Buckland) remained some time, then returned to camp Thus stood matters on that eventful Saturday night. Colonel Hildebrand and myself occupied the same tent; it stood adjacento fill so important a page in our country's annals. Colonel Hildebrand, not feeling well, retired early, but I remained up the left, in the direction of General Prentiss. As Colonel Hildebrand was not well; he was advised to remain quiet, and I grew hotter and nearer. The regiment was in line. Colonel Hildebrand was pressed to join in a cup of coffee, remarking thhe trees over our tent, that the battle had opened! Colonel Hildebrand said: Colonel, aid me with the brigade; send the majned over one-third of my command. The promptness of Colonel Hildebrand, in ordering up the other regiments of his brigade,
Lew Wallace (search for this): chapter 50
of March. Savannah, ten miles below, was selected as the headquarters of the commanding general. The division of General Lew Wallace was landed at Crump's, four miles above Savannah, and the other five divisions of McClernand, Smith, Hurlbut, Sherrcements. Meeting an advancing column, I found on inquiry it was General Smith's Division, commanded by General W. 11. L. Wallace, of Illinois. He was advised of the attempted flank movement, and requested to change his line of march in the directi the force and condition of the Army of Tennessee, and was answered-showing fifteen thousand men, with the division of Lew Wallace, not engaged on Sunday-and Buell assured him that the Army of the Ohio would be ready to co-operate in an offensive mok, the combined forces of Grant and Buell moved against the enemy. General Buell's fresh troops, with the division of Lew Wallace, not engaged on Sunday (why, may, perhaps, never be known), pressed the enemy at all points. Steadily the army of the
Grant Ulysses Grant (search for this): chapter 50
aps, never be fully known or appreciated. General Grant says, in his report: There was the most coennessee, and by order of General Halleck, General Grant was appointed to its command, with headquanessee. About this time arose a dilemma. General Grant, as alleged, on account of some dissatisfaeved that Beauregard and Johnston would strike Grant or the Army of the Tennessee before Buell couldepartment to which he has been assigned. General Grant, it may be stated in explanation, his heade two fields! After the battle of Shiloh, General Grant ordered the dead of both armies to be buriestions which may be difficult to settle. General Grant's biographer, Professor Coppe, discussing sh troops inspirited the shattered brigades of Grant, and dispirited those of Beauregard, are pointe judgment, no men could have done better than Grant's army did on Sunday. Veterans could not havehey were remiss on the field is not true. General Grant, after reaching the field, was active, and[5 more...]
till pressed forward. The keen eye of Hardee soon detected the wide gap between Sherman and Prentiss. This gap — more than a mile in width-General Sherman says was left to be occupied by part of Buell's troops. It almost proved to be an open highway to the flanks and rear of the Union lines. General Hurlbut has recently informed the writer that he was opposed to flanking movements which might jeopard his own command. Into this gap he pushed several brigades commanded by Gibson, Anderson, Pond, and others, and attempted to sweep round on Sherman's left. The camp of the Fifty-third Ohio having been gained and three of Waterhouse's guns captured, the line near Sherman's headquarters was enfiladed and driven back in confusion. McClernand promptly supported Sherman, but seeing the flanking movement of Hardee, I was ordered to hurry up reinforcements. Meeting an advancing column, I found on inquiry it was General Smith's Division, commanded by General W. 11. L. Wallace, of Illinois.
Billy Sherman (search for this): chapter 50
five divisions of McClernand, Smith, Hurlbut, Sherman, and Prentiss, disembarked at Pittsburg Landie Tennessee expedition was the initiation and Sherman's march the culmination; and in connection wiereafter, perhaps, be better determined. General Sherman says the camp was chosen by General Smithturned to camp to report the situation to General Sherman, and get their respective commands in rea, and then we would advance on Corinth. General Sherman's positive manner of uttering his opinione Army of the Tennessee, were as follows: General Sherman occupied the extreme front at Shiloh churoops, particularly the advance division under Sherman, were mostly fresh from the recruiting camps, brigade headquarters. It was here where General Sherman rode early in the opening of the battle a, and others, and attempted to sweep round on Sherman's left. The camp of the Fifty-third Ohio hav in confusion. McClernand promptly supported Sherman, but seeing the flanking movement of Hardee, [18 more...]
Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 50
federate army, commanded by the most experienced officers-Johnston, Beauregard, Bragg, Hardee, Polk, Cheatham, Breckenridge-and a long list of subordinate commanders the reserve. The first line was commanded by General Hardee, supported by General Bragg; the second line by Generals Bragg and Polk, and the third by General BreckGenerals Bragg and Polk, and the third by General Breckenridge. These lines were separated from five to eight hundred yards. General Beauregard was on the left, General Johnston on the right. Standing in front of Shilohthe day came from that quarter. The force encountered was Ruggles' Division of Bragg's Corps. He requested that a battery should be sent to him. Captain J. W. Poweo us from masked batteries of grape and canister and also from rifle-pits. General Bragg ordered General Chalmers to drive us into the river at all hazards. In vaid by the formidable natural barriers, prevented the execution of Beauregard and Bragg's humane orders! Gradually the firing ceased. The Sabbath closed upon a scene
Carolinian (search for this): chapter 50
nce is ordered. The shattered brigades of Beauregard enter the ravine and close up on the contracted lines, protected by the siege guns. Three different times, reports one of the commanders, did we go into that valley of death, and as often were we forced back. Another reports: A murderous fire was poured into us from masked batteries of grape and canister and also from rifle-pits. General Bragg ordered General Chalmers to drive us into the river at all hazards. In vain did this brave Carolinian, who sacrificed his own life and a large portion of his command, attempt to do so. The concentrated fire of the Union army, aided by the formidable natural barriers, prevented the execution of Beauregard and Bragg's humane orders! Gradually the firing ceased. The Sabbath closed upon a scene which had no parallel on the Western Continent. The sun went down in a red halo, as if the very heavens blushed and prepared to weep at the enormity of man's violence. Night fell upon and spread its
vantages we went into the great battle of Sunday. At gray dawn, on the morning of the 6th, Lieutenant Burriss, of Captain Sisson's company, Seventy-seventh Ohio Volunteers-a regiment recruited from the border counties of Western Virginia and Ohioters and communicated the intelligence that the enemy were gathering in great force. He was sent back with orders to Captain Sisson to maintain the picket line, but if attacked to retire in order, holding the enemy in check. We heard dropping shots report the facts to General Sherman, whose headquarters were about four hundred yards to our rear. In a few minutes Captain Sisson reached camp, confirming all his lieutenant had communicated, and adding that the enemy swarmed in the old cotton fieed firing on our pickets, and believed, from the rapid firing on Prentiss' line, that he had been attacked in force. Captain Sisson returned to his command, and the writer went at once to General Sherman's headquarters. He was met at his tent. The
J. R. Anderson (search for this): chapter 50
, they still pressed forward. The keen eye of Hardee soon detected the wide gap between Sherman and Prentiss. This gap — more than a mile in width-General Sherman says was left to be occupied by part of Buell's troops. It almost proved to be an open highway to the flanks and rear of the Union lines. General Hurlbut has recently informed the writer that he was opposed to flanking movements which might jeopard his own command. Into this gap he pushed several brigades commanded by Gibson, Anderson, Pond, and others, and attempted to sweep round on Sherman's left. The camp of the Fifty-third Ohio having been gained and three of Waterhouse's guns captured, the line near Sherman's headquarters was enfiladed and driven back in confusion. McClernand promptly supported Sherman, but seeing the flanking movement of Hardee, I was ordered to hurry up reinforcements. Meeting an advancing column, I found on inquiry it was General Smith's Division, commanded by General W. 11. L. Wallace, of Il
W. W. Wood (search for this): chapter 50
neral Buell's fresh troops, with the division of Lew Wallace, not engaged on Sunday (why, may, perhaps, never be known), pressed the enemy at all points. Steadily the army of the Union regained our camps, and by noon a signal victory had been achieved. Beauregard withdrew his forces in good order, and pursuit was not continued beyond Shiloh church. Tuesday, the 8th,--.General Sherman determined to pursue. With two brigades from his own division, two from Buell's army (Generals Garfield and Wood), and two regiments of cavalry, he proceeded from Shiloh in the direction of Corinth. At the distance of a little over a mile, we came upon the advance camp of the enemy, on Saturday night. Everywhere along our line of march remains of the retreating army were noticed. Fresh graves were all around; the dead, dying, and wounded lay in tents, old houses, and upon the ground. We were marched to a point about four and a half miles from the church, when our videttes informed us the rebel cavalr
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