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the enemy. General Buell's fresh troops, with the division of Lew Wallace, not engaged on Sunday (why, may, perhaps, never be known), pressed the enemy at all points. Steadily the army of the Union regained our camps, and by noon a signal victory had been achieved. Beauregard withdrew his forces in good order, and pursuit was not continued beyond Shiloh church. Tuesday, the 8th,--.General Sherman determined to pursue. With two brigades from his own division, two from Buell's army (Generals Garfield and Wood), and two regiments of cavalry, he proceeded from Shiloh in the direction of Corinth. At the distance of a little over a mile, we came upon the advance camp of the enemy, on Saturday night. Everywhere along our line of march remains of the retreating army were noticed. Fresh graves were all around; the dead, dying, and wounded lay in tents, old houses, and upon the ground. We were marched to a point about four and a half miles from the church, when our videttes informed us
Charles F. Smith (search for this): chapter 50
r, was ordered to remain at Fort Henry and to turn the command over to General Charles F. Smith, an officer of the regular army, with few equals in or out of the servCrump's, four miles above Savannah, and the other five divisions of McClernand, Smith, Hurlbut, Sherman, and Prentiss, disembarked at Pittsburg Landing, which consisperhaps, be better determined. General Sherman says the camp was chosen by General Smith, and by his orders he (Sherman and Hurlbut) took position. He further saysand neglecting the proper defenses at Shiloh, there can be no question. If General Smith erred in selecting the ground or disposing the troops, who was responsible of the forces of General Grant, who, on account of the continued illness of General Smith, and an explanation with General Halleck, was ordered, March 14th, to assum up reinforcements. Meeting an advancing column, I found on inquiry it was General Smith's Division, commanded by General W. 11. L. Wallace, of Illinois. He was ad
Walter H. Taylor (search for this): chapter 50
Shiloh church stood on the brow of a sloping hill, at the base flowing Owl creek. To the left of the chapel were the camps of the Seventy-seventh and Fifty-seventh Ohio. The brigade headquarters were immediately to the right of the church. The wood had been cut for camp use from a considerable portion of the hillside fronting the church. Down this hill front, in the direction of Owl creek, the Fifty-seventh and Seventy-seventh Ohio were thrown, and also a portion of the Fourth Brigade. Taylor's battery had a good position to the right of the church, and was ordered to unlimber for action. The Fifty-third formed in their own camp, which was an old peach orchard. They were supported by Waterhouse's battery. The hour was now about seven o'clock, and the battle opened with great fury. The enemy advanced to the attack of our forces by three distinct lines of battle. The first, according to General Beauregard's report, extended from Owl creek on the left to Lick creek on the ri
ty, it is respectfully and earnestly suggested that Congress adopt some measure for the preservation of the remains at Shiloh — that a cemetery be established, and graves properly marked; also, that the church at Shiloh be rebuilt as a national memorial! As the church that was at Shiloh has passed into history, a brief description may not be uninteresting. It was a small, unpretending edifice, of hewn logs, and occupied the brow of a hill, with a commanding prospect. It was built in 1849-50 by Rev. Jacob J. Wolff, a local minister of the Methodist Church. It was not a costly edifice; no massive architrave was there; no stained windows or carved lintels; but these were not essential to the simple-minded people who worshiped in it, and who worshiped before they had a church in the grand old woods, which we know were God's first temples. The church at Shiloh had two doors and one window, which was without glass. Of pulpit and seats none were visible, as the Confederate General C
April 6th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 50
The battle of Shiloh. Colonel Wills De Hass. The 6th of April, 1862, was a day fraught with momentous issues for the future of the American Republic. The evening of the 5th had witnessed the concentration of a great army, whose leaders had boastingly declared in the pride of their strength should, on the coming morn, overwhelm and destroy the army of the Union which lay encamped in conscious security around the wilderness church of Shiloh! At no period during our prolonged and sanguinary civil war was the Union more imperiled than on that eventful Saturday evening. The battle of Shiloh was the first decisive and, pre-eminently, the most important of the war. Defeat then would have been the greatest disaster that could have befallen the arms of the Union. The country can never know the full danger of that hour, and the pen of the historian can never portray the peril which hung over the Army of the Tennessee. Congress received the announcement of events then culminating in pr
tunity, it is respectfully and earnestly suggested that Congress adopt some measure for the preservation of the remains at Shiloh — that a cemetery be established, and graves properly marked; also, that the church at Shiloh be rebuilt as a national memorial! As the church that was at Shiloh has passed into history, a brief description may not be uninteresting. It was a small, unpretending edifice, of hewn logs, and occupied the brow of a hill, with a commanding prospect. It was built in 1849-50 by Rev. Jacob J. Wolff, a local minister of the Methodist Church. It was not a costly edifice; no massive architrave was there; no stained windows or carved lintels; but these were not essential to the simple-minded people who worshiped in it, and who worshiped before they had a church in the grand old woods, which we know were God's first temples. The church at Shiloh had two doors and one window, which was without glass. Of pulpit and seats none were visible, as the Confederate Gener
August, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 50
s of free discussion and condemnation. Whether just or not, can hereafter, perhaps, be better determined. General Sherman says the camp was chosen by General Smith, and by his orders he (Sherman and Hurlbut) took position. He further says: I mention for future history that our right flank was well guarded by Owl and Snake creeks, our left by Lick creek, leaving us simply to guard our front. No stronger position was ever held by any army. --(Record of court-martial, Memphis, Tennessee, August, 1862.) When the writer reached Shiloh (April 2d) he found the impression general that a great battle was imminent. Experienced officers believed that Beauregard and Johnston would strike Grant or the Army of the Tennessee before Buell could unite the Army of the Ohio. We found the army at Shiloh listless of danger, and in the worst possible condition of defense. The divisions were scattered over an extended space, with great intervals, and at one point a most dangerous gap. Not the sem
advance early on the morrow. Monday morning, at six o'clock, the combined forces of Grant and Buell moved against the enemy. General Buell's fresh troops, with the division of Lew Wallace, not engaged on Sunday (why, may, perhaps, never be known), pressed the enemy at all points. Steadily the army of the Union regained our camps, and by noon a signal victory had been achieved. Beauregard withdrew his forces in good order, and pursuit was not continued beyond Shiloh church. Tuesday, the 8th,--.General Sherman determined to pursue. With two brigades from his own division, two from Buell's army (Generals Garfield and Wood), and two regiments of cavalry, he proceeded from Shiloh in the direction of Corinth. At the distance of a little over a mile, we came upon the advance camp of the enemy, on Saturday night. Everywhere along our line of march remains of the retreating army were noticed. Fresh graves were all around; the dead, dying, and wounded lay in tents, old houses, and upo
information, of such vital importance to our army, was disregarded, and we slumbered on the very verge of a volcano. It was expected, says General Beauregard, we should be able to reach the enemy's lines in time to attack them early on the fifth instant. In consequence, however, of the bad condition of the roads from late heavy rains, the army did not reach the immediate vicinity of the enemy until late on Saturday afternoon. It was then decided the attack should be made on the next morning y-hunters utterly demolished the structure, and carried off the last remnant of a log. Before closing I may be expected to answer one question: Was the army at Shiloh surprised? It has already been shown what was the condition of things on the 5th, and surely no one will say that the Third Brigade of Sherman's Division was surprised. The same may be said of the Fourth Brigade, and the principal officers of the Fifth Ohio Cavalry; but here exceptions cease. The whole of that army, with indi
Prentiss' camp, intersecting the road from Hamburg, seven miles further up the river. These troops, particularly the advance division under Sherman, were mostly fresh from the recruiting camps, and wholly unpracticed, even in the simplest company maneuvres. Many of the regiments were not supplied with arms until their departure up the Tennessee. This was the case with my own regiment. With such disadvantages we went into the great battle of Sunday. At gray dawn, on the morning of the 6th, Lieutenant Burriss, of Captain Sisson's company, Seventy-seventh Ohio Volunteers-a regiment recruited from the border counties of Western Virginia and Ohio-came to brigade headquarters and communicated the intelligence that the enemy were gathering in great force. He was sent back with orders to Captain Sisson to maintain the picket line, but if attacked to retire in order, holding the enemy in check. We heard dropping shots over the whole of our immediate front and tolerably brisk firing
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