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Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
Capital with despatches explaining his views. The decision of the government was, that he should press the enemy at Harper's Ferry, threaten an invasion of Maryland, and an assault upon the Federal capital, and thus make the most energetic diversioigade again in advance. Charlestown is a handsome village, the seat of justice of Jefferson county, eight miles from Harper's Ferry. When about five miles from the former place, General Winder received information that the enemy was in possession o the 2nd regiment, Virginia infantry, was sent to Loudon heights, with the hope of being able to drive the enemy from Harper's Ferry, across the Potomac. But this movement was no sooner made than General Jackson received intelligence which imperioused, cannot easily be described. The town is greatly improved in its loyalty. A few days after, while threatening Harper's Ferry, he sent messages to the Confederate Government by his zealous supporter and assistant, the Hon. Mr. Boteler of the C
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
strong and increasing army under General McDowell, at Fredericksburg, threatened it by a northern route of only three marchudden withdrawal of his whole army from the Valley, to Fredericksburg, for a combined movement with McDowell against Richmonctions: If General Banks moved his army to McDowell at Fredericksburg, to march immediately by way of Gordonsville, and joinn the case that they were compelled to follow Banks to Fredericksburg, General Edward Johnson was to be left with his six red of Richmond, to defend the approaches on the side of Fredericksburg; where they soon after suffered a disastrous defeat f same uneasiness concerning an attack from the side of Fredericksburg. After a series of despatches, varying with the appeaerred without delay to aid an aggressive movement from Fredericksburg, as General Lee anticipated. Milroy having been caughl and Augur, were not enough to protect the road from Fredericksburg to Washington against the embarrassed Confederates, Ba
Harrisonburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
lle. But he had just been informed by General Jackson, that he was hastening back, to effect a junction with him near Harrisonburg, and to assail Banks. Mounting his horse, without escort, General Ewell rode express, night and day, and met Jackson r. It was therefore concluded between them, that the junction should be completed at New Market, a day's march below Harrisonburg. The unwearied Ewell, after resting his limbs during public worship, again mounted his horse and returned to hurry on division. It is now time to pause, and explain the proceedings of General Banks. His precipitate withdrawal from Harrisonburg, upon the movement of Generals Jackson and Ewell, has been described. He retired first to New Market, and then, leavi but they were systematically robbed of their horses, and other live-stock by General Banks, in his march to and from Harrisonburg. This commander officially boasted to his Government, that the results of his conquest had supplied his artillery and
Newtown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ord and Flournoy, was directed to strike the Winchester road at the village of Newtown, nine miles from that town, with directions to observe the movements of the eny in motion, Brigadier-General Stewart had already sent news of his arrival at Newtown, where he captured a number of ambulances, with prisoners and medical stores,de, which had now come up, took the front, and the whole army advanced towards Newtown. The deserted wagon-train of the enemy was found standing, in many cases with the horses attached, and occupied the road for a mile. Upon approaching Newtown, the General was disappointed to find his artillery arrested, and wholly unsupporte guns of Captain Poague were immediately placed in position upon arriving near Newtown, oin an opposing eminence, and replied to the Federal battery upon the right osed Winchester. It travelled, in fact, from Hall-town, to the neighborhood of Newtown, a distance of thirty-five miles: and the 2nd Virginia regiment, which had its
Strasburg (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
eaving a heavy rear-guard in that region, to Strasbourg, twenty miles above Winchester; where he begeneral Banks was consigned to the defence of Strasbourg. Whereas, if Staunton was not won at once, nd its northern end from the neighborhood of Strasbourg, and meets the south fork emerging from the extended his pickets to the neighborhood of Strasbourg, where he closed the whole breadth of the grlroad communications between Front Royal and Strasbourg, and of preventing the passage of reinforcemined to move the body of his army neither to Strasbourg nor to Winchester, but to Middletown, a villst of it, through which the great roads from Strasbourg and Front-Royal approach. The former, espeche whole army was in motion, retreating upon Strasbourg, the point at which it was expected Shieldsand sore of limb, and completed the march to Strasbourg in the forenoon. When they arrived there, tth success at Front Royal on Friday, between Strasbourg and Winchester on Saturday, and here with a [10 more...]
Mossy Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
Harrisonburg, and to assail Banks. Mounting his horse, without escort, General Ewell rode express, night and day, and met Jackson on the Sabbath, May 18th, at Mossy Creek, to inform him of this necessity for inflicting so cruel a disappointment upon him. The latter uttered no complaint, and made no comment; although the sleeplessre much contracted, by a cordon of sentries. Every movement above was thus screened effectually from the observation of General Banks. General Jackson, leaving Mossy Creek Monday, the 19th of May, proceeded by two marches, to the neighborhood of New Market. He there met the fine brigade of General Richard Taylor, which had marche included the brigades of Taylor, Trimble, Elzey, and Stewart, and the cavalry regiments of Ashby, Munford, and Flournoy, with eight batteries of artillery. At Mossy Creek, he had been met by Brigadier-General George H. Stewart, a native of Maryland, whom the Confederate Government had just commissioned, and charged with the task
Hall Town (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
t in twenty minutes the enemy retired in great disorder, throwing away their arms and baggage. The pursuit was continued rapidly with artillery and infantry to Hall-town, a hamlet a couple of miles from the Potomac. A short distance beyond that point, General Winder observing the enemy strongly posted on Bolivar Heights, and in ports; and he therefore arrested the pursuit, and returned to the vicinity of Charlestown. On the following day, the main body of the army took position near Hall-town, and the 2nd regiment, Virginia infantry, was sent to Loudon heights, with the hope of being able to drive the enemy from Harper's Ferry, across the Potomac. Bupture. He, therefore, sent back orders to the Stonewall Brigade, not to pause in its march on the 30th, until it passed Winchester. It travelled, in fact, from Hall-town, to the neighborhood of Newtown, a distance of thirty-five miles: and the 2nd Virginia regiment, which had its steps to retrace from the heights beyond the Shena
Drewry's Bluff (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ost. The ships paused to make soundings, and to reconnoitre the banks; and meantime, the citizens went to work. The City Council called upon the Confederate Engineers, to know what they lacked for the immediate completion of their works; and pledged themselves to supply everything. The citizens themselves turned laborers, and drapers and bankers were seen at the port, loading barges with stone. Two or three excellent guns were mounted; great timbers were hewn, floated to the foot of Drewry's Bluff, and built into a row of cribs; which, when ballasted with stone and bricks, promised to resist the momentum of the heaviest ships. By the 15th of May, when the advance of the Federal fleet appeared, after their cautious dallying, these beginnings of defences were made; and the three guns, manned by Confederate marines, gloriously beat off the gunboats Monitor and Galena, with no little damage of their boasted invulnerability. The benefit wrought by these events upon the temper of t
Meadow Mills (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
urg. General Jackson, regarding this as an indication of a purpose to cut a way for retreat through his forces, immediately formed Taylor's brigade south of the village, and advanced it, with a few guns, to meet their attempt. The brigade of Colonel Campbell soon after arriving, was brought up to support it. But the enemy's courage was not adequate to so bold an exploit; the cannonade was only tentative; and, after a short skirmish, a column of flame and smoke arising from the valley of Cedar Creek told that they had fired the bridge over that stream, in order to protect themselves from attack. This fragment of the broken army, which was probably small in numbers, finally fled westward; and either took refuge with General Fremont in the valley of the South Branch, or made its way, piecemeal, to the Potomac, along the base of the Great North Mountain. A large amount of baggage fell into the hands of the victors at the scene of this combat; entire regiments, apparently in line of b
New Market (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
uthorized such an exercise of power. It was therefore concluded between them, that the junction should be completed at New Market, a day's march below Harrisonburg. The unwearied Ewell, after resting his limbs during public worship, again mounted withdrawal from Harrisonburg, upon the movement of Generals Jackson and Ewell, has been described. He retired first to New Market, and then, leaving a heavy rear-guard in that region, to Strasbourg, twenty miles above Winchester; where he began fortarms, and woodlands, converging towards the great Valley Turnpike as it approaches the town. When Shields evacuated New Market, Colonel Ashby advanced his quarters to it, and extended his pickets to the neighborhood of Strasbourg, where he closedl Banks. General Jackson, leaving Mossy Creek Monday, the 19th of May, proceeded by two marches, to the neighborhood of New Market. He there met the fine brigade of General Richard Taylor, which had marched from Elk Run valley by the Western side of
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