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y Chew's battery, and two rifled guns from the famous battery of Pendleton, now commanded by Captain Poague. Next followed the brigade of Taylor, and the remainder of the infantry. Colonel Ashby kepown, his advance was confronted by a body of Federal cavalry, evidently sent to observe him. Captain Poague's section of artillery being then in front, the General ordered him instantly to gallop forw curious inefficiency of officers in the volunteer Confederate army. The rifled guns of Captain Poague were immediately placed in position upon arriving near Newtown, oin an opposing eminence, an The General immediately advanced a strong detachment of artillery, composed of the batteries of Poague, Carpenter and Cutshaw, aid posted them advantageously just behind the crests of the hill. The on an eminence far to his left, whence they hoped to enfilade the ground occupied by the guns of Poague; and, nearer to his left front, a body of riflemen were just seizing a position behind an obliqu
e embarrassed Confederates, Banks detached the best brigades he had,--those of Shields and Kimball, containing seven thousand men,--and sent them on the 14th of May, him. And he completed the chapter of errors in this, that by sending away General Shields he evacuated the New Market Gap, and gave to General Jackson the fatal optThis was the position which Banks deserted without cause, when he detached General Shields to Eastern Virginia. As the traveller proceeds northeast down the county nverging towards the great Valley Turnpike as it approaches the town. When Shields evacuated New Market, Colonel Ashby advanced his quarters to it, and extended kened by its disasters, to a portion of sense and activity, gave orders to General Shields, to move upon General Jackson's communications from tie Rappahannock, and was in motion, retreating upon Strasbourg, the point at which it was expected Shields and Fremont would attempt their junction. General Winder was ordered to recal
Every movement above was thus screened effectually from the observation of General Banks. General Jackson, leaving Mossy Creek Monday, the 19th of May, proceeded by two marches, to the neighborhood of New Market. He there met the fine brigade of General Richard Taylor, which had marched from Elk Run valley by the Western side of the Masanuttin Mountain. On Wednesday, the 21st he crossed the New Market Gap, and in the neighborhood of Luray, completed his union with the remainder of General EwellPs forces. His army now contained about sixteen thousand effective men, with forty field guns. It was composed of his own division, embracing the brigades of Winder, Campbell, and Taliaferro, of General Ewell's division, which included the brigades of Taylor, Trimble, Elzey, and Stewart, and the cavalry regiments of Ashby, Munford, and Flournoy, with eight batteries of artillery. At Mossy Creek, he had been met by Brigadier-General George H. Stewart, a native of Maryland, whom the Confe
been transferred without delay to aid an aggressive movement from Fredericksburg, as General Lee anticipated. Milroy having been caught, beaten, and chased, like a hunted beast, through the mountains, Blenker's division was now hurried to the support of him and General Fremont. It arrived just when Jackson had left them alone, and it left General Banks just when he was about to be assailed by him. Worse than all: as though an army of nearly forty thousand men, under Generals McDowell and Augur, were not enough to protect the road from Fredericksburg to Washington against the embarrassed Confederates, Banks detached the best brigades he had,--those of Shields and Kimball, containing seven thousand men,--and sent them on the 14th of May, by way of Luray and Front Royal, to support the forces on the Rappahannock. It was this movement, so unaccountable in its folly, which, being observed by General Ewell, led him to believe, for a moment, that Banks's whole force had gone to assail R
through the mountains, Blenker's division was now hurried to the support of him and General Fremont. It arrived just when Jackson had left them alone, and it left General Banks just when he was about to be assailed by him. Worse than all: as though an army of nearly forty thousand men, under Generals McDowell and Augur, were not enough to protect the road from Fredericksburg to Washington against the embarrassed Confederates, Banks detached the best brigades he had,--those of Shields and Kimball, containing seven thousand men,--and sent them on the 14th of May, by way of Luray and Front Royal, to support the forces on the Rappahannock. It was this movement, so unaccountable in its folly, which, being observed by General Ewell, led him to believe, for a moment, that Banks's whole force had gone to assail Richmond from that quarter. This unlucky General thus reduced himself to about eighteen thousand men, at the critical moment when the storm was about to burst upon him. And he com
Theodore S. Munford (search for this): chapter 13
er, Campbell, and Taliaferro, of General Ewell's division, which included the brigades of Taylor, Trimble, Elzey, and Stewart, and the cavalry regiments of Ashby, Munford, and Flournoy, with eight batteries of artillery. At Mossy Creek, he had been met by Brigadier-General George H. Stewart, a native of Maryland, whom the Confederns between Front Royal and Strasbourg, and of preventing the passage of reinforcements or fugitives between the two posts. Colonel Flournoy, with his own and Colonel Munford's regiments, kept a short distance west of the river, and having executed his orders, now appeared upon the Winchester road, in the most timely manner, to joid, observing appearances of the enemy's retreat, and prepared to strike him in flank. Brigadier-General Stewart, in temporary command of the cavalry regiments of Munford and Flournoy, was directed to strike the Winchester road at the village of Newtown, nine miles from that town, with directions to observe the movements of the ene
A. R. Boteler (search for this): chapter 13
manifested by the people of Winchester, as our army yesterday passed through the town in pursuit of the enemy. The town was nearly frantic with joy. Our entrance into Winchester was one of the most stirring scenes of my life. Such joy as the inhabitants manifested, cannot easily be described. The town is greatly improved in its loyalty. A few days after, while threatening Harper's Ferry, he sent messages to the Confederate Government by his zealous supporter and assistant, the Hon. Mr. Boteler of the Congress, begging for an increase of his force. He pointed out again that an assault upon the enemy's territory, indicating danger to their capital, was the most ready and certain method to deliver Richmond from the approaches of General McClellan. Tell them, he said, that I have now but fifteen thousand effective men. If the present opening is improved as it should be, I must have forty thousand. But the Government was unable to advance these reinforcements, and Divine Providenc
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 13
sert Richmond to the enemy. Not only was it left approachable by water; but the grand army of McClellan had pressed from the peninsula up to the neighborhood of the city on the east, while a strongd. General Lee, reasoning from the strategic principles which he thought should have governed McClellan and Banks, and from news of partial movements of the forces of the latter towards Eastern Virgoaches on the side of Fredericksburg; where they soon after suffered a disastrous defeat from McClellan's advance, at Hanover Court House. Jackson was also very nearly deprived of the assistance of capital, and thus make the most energetic diversion possible, to draw a part of the forces of McClellan and McDowell from Richmond. After allowing his troops two days of needed rest, the army was m capital, was the most ready and certain method to deliver Richmond from the approaches of General McClellan. Tell them, he said, that I have now but fifteen thousand effective men. If the present op
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 13
chmond; or even to the peninsula. General Jackson was steadfast in the opinion, that Banks's objective point was still Staunton, and the command of the Central Railroad; and he therefore confidently expected to fight him in the Valley. General Joseph E. Johnston, who, as commander of the Department of North Virginia, was still General Jackson's immediate superior, constantly instructed him and General Ewell, in his despatches to them, to observe these two injunctions: If General Banks moved hisroposed that if Jackson, under whose immediate orders he was, as ranking Major-General, would assume the responsibility of detaining him until a remonstrance could be uttered against his removal, he would remain. The contingency under which General Johnston had authorized him to leave the Valley had not yet occurred; and the discretion which their general instructions conceded to General Jackson, for regulating his movements according to circumstances, authorized such an exercise of power. It
Chapter 12: Winchester. While General Jackson was hurrying back from Franklin, critical events were occurring at Richmond, which must be known in order to appreciate the value of his victories, and their effect upon the public mind. The destruction of the ship Virginia by her crew, on the 11th of May, has been narrated. This blunder left the River James open to the enemy's fleet, up to the wharves of the city. The Confederate engineers had indeed projected an earthwork upon an admirable position, seven miles below, where the lands of a planter named Drewry overlooked a narrow reach of the stream, in a lofty bluff or precipitous hill. But so nerveless and dilatory had been their exertions, that when the river was thus opened to the enemy, there were neither guns mounted upon the unfinished ramparts of earth, nor obstructions completed in the channel beneath. The Legislature of Virginia had urged upon the Confederate War Department, the vast importance of defending this avenu
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