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Frederick (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
on the 6th of September occupied the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and the flourishing town of Frederick. The arrival of the Confederates in Maryland awakened in a part of the population — a faint ge soundness of his counsel and the soundness of General Lee's expectation, that his advance on Frederick ought naturally to result in the peaceable occupation of Harper's Ferry by the Confederates. ovements of the enemy gave General Jackson a respite from the 6th to the 10th of September, at Frederick, which he improved in resting and refitting his command. The day after his arrival was the Sae enemy's advance; and, as their masses began to press more heavily upon him, fell back toward Frederick. The whole Confederate army had arrived there, and was encamped near the town. General Lee nclearly set forth in any way as by the order which unfolded them to his Lieutenants, issued at Frederick, September 9th:-- The army will resume its march to-morrow, taking the Hagerstown road.
Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
will resume its march to-morrow, taking the Hagerstown road. General Jackson's command will form the main body of the army at Greensborough or Hagerstown. It will be seen that the advance was aains to Boonsborough. The next day, leaving Hagerstown on his right, General Jackson marched to Wilhe other wing, supposed to be tending toward Hagerstown; to crush the former first, delivering the bad southward to Harper's Ferry, northward to Hagerstown, westward to Shepherdstown, upon the Virginiextended that wing to the highway leading to Hagerstown. The evening of that day was expended by thf Hood, nearly filling the space between the Hagerstown road and the Potomac. To rest his extreme lgades of Lawton and Trimble were between the Hagerstown road and the command of D. H. Hill. On the were hotly engaged in the woods east of the Hagerstown road. Very soon the Confederates were driver assistance. They had been driven from the Hagerstown road, across an elevated field, and into a w
Williamsport (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
d his minions, before the latter General could turn about. A few days after, when he heard that Jackson was indeed passing to the south side of the Potomac at Williamsport, a hundred miles away, he was sure that the catastrophe was at hand. Hence, he detained McClellan in his march; he entreated him not to proceed far from the Cesday, September 10th, he set out, and marched across the mountains to Boonsborough. The next day, leaving Hagerstown on his right, General Jackson marched to Williamsport; and crossing the Potomac at that place, re-entered Virginia a full day's march west of Harper's Ferry. Then, dividing his forces, he sent General A. P. Hill re immediately into Virginia, by entrusting the defence of his rear to General Jackson, and by sending General Stuart with his cavalry back across the river at Williamsport, to threaten the enemy's right flank and harass his movements. But now, concluding from the report of General Pendleton, that the Federal army might be attemp
Orange Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
at Staunton, along that still abundant country. Or else, he might cross the Potomac between the Federal fortifications and the Blue Ridge, and entering the middle regions of Maryland, proceed as the movements of the enemy should indicate. He adopted the latter plan. His purpose was, first to draw the Federal army from the Virginian bank by violently threatening their Capital and Baltimore, from the other side, so that his field hospitals at Manassa's Plains, his own communications toward Orange, and the important work of removing his prisoners, wounded and spoils, from the scene of his late triumphs, might be relieved from their incursions for a Season. He also hoped, that when the head of his great column began to insinuate itself between Washington and Harper's Ferry, the Federal detachment at the latter place would act upon the obvious dictate of the military art, evacuate that place to him without a struggle, and retire into communication with their friends; thus clearing his
Staunton, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
rts. On the 3rd the Confederate army was upon the march for the fords of the Potomac! The invasion determined on, two places offered themselves to General Lee for penetrating into Maryland. If he removed his army directly across the Blue Ridge to the Lower Valley, he could easily brush away the force which occupied Martinsburg; when the valley of central Pennsylvania would lie open before him, and his own line of communication could be established with the Central Virginia Railroad at Staunton, along that still abundant country. Or else, he might cross the Potomac between the Federal fortifications and the Blue Ridge, and entering the middle regions of Maryland, proceed as the movements of the enemy should indicate. He adopted the latter plan. His purpose was, first to draw the Federal army from the Virginian bank by violently threatening their Capital and Baltimore, from the other side, so that his field hospitals at Manassa's Plains, his own communications toward Orange, and
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
guarding the fords, sought encampments for them, where they might find the much needed repose. When McClellan perceived that the Confederates had retired he began to claim the battle of Sharpsburg as a glorious victory. He forgot that at Malvern Hill he had also claimed a splendid victory because he was permitted to do something similar to that which General Lee had now done, except that it was less successful. There he had stood on the defensive in the position of his choice; he had beatded to the rear; had buried his dead, save where the impetuosity of his victorious men had carried them into the enemy's line; had offered battle defiantly on the succeeding day; and, after this, had retired at his leisure, and unmolested. If Malvern Hill was a victory for McClellan, by parity of reasoning, Sharpsburg was more a victory for Lee. But the Confederates did not claim it as a decisive victory, for it did not gain them the main object for which it was fought. It has been said th
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
vages should be retorted upon the aggressor. Maryland, it was known, had succumbed reluctantly to hhemselves to General Lee for penetrating into Maryland. If he removed his army directly across the nce. His purpose was then to move toward Western Maryland and Central Pennsylvania, establish his cwas haunted with the fear that the march into Maryland was a feint,--that only a small detachment wa more than half of the army was safely out of Maryland, the corps of Jackson, and the divisions of MWalker; it was necessary for them to re-enter Maryland, in order to fight at Sharpsburg. Nor is it n; to redeem their offers of aid to oppressed Maryland; to conquer. a peace by defeating their opprs, it was better to have fought the battle in Maryland, than to have left it without a struggle. Inat moment, Virginia lost, Washington menaced, Maryland invaded, the national cause could afford no r loss of the whole Confederate army, while in Maryland, was ten thousand three hundred, killed and w[9 more...]
South Mountain, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
s quiet existence amidst the hills and woods, dreaming little of the fame which was to connect its name forever with the greatest battle of this gigantic campaign. It is situated at the intersection of six roads, two and a half miles east of the Potomac, and one mile west of Antietam Creek, a picturesque mill-stream, which descends from the north, and separates between the rolling hills of the great valley, and the long, sloping ridges which form the western bases of the Blue Ridge, or South Mountain. The roads which centre at the village lead southward to Harper's Ferry, northward to Hagerstown, westward to Shepherdstown, upon the Virginian shore of the Potomac, eastward to Boonsborough, and southeastward to Pleasant Valley. It was by the last two that McClellan's army approached; and these highways passed the Antietam upon substantial bridges of stone; while other practicable crossings, above and below, were offered by fords and country roads of less note. The country around S
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
at hand. Hence, he detained McClellan in his march; he entreated him not to proceed far from the Capital; he warned him to look well to his endangered left. These fancies of the Generalissimo are of interest only as showing the conviction of Jackson's enemies, that there was nothing which was not within reach of his rapid audacity, and as evincing how happily his prowess confounded their counsels. These uncertain and dilatory movements of the enemy gave General Jackson a respite from thomplex for realizing that punctual and complete concentration which sound policy required. The latter, being preferred by the Commander-in-Chief was adopted. It would be unjust to point to its partial results as proof of super rior sagacity in Jackson, for the impartial reader would remember that the plan of his preference was never tried; and, if it had been, the test of experiment might have shown that it also was only capable of imperfect success. It should be added that the execution of
Antietam Creek (United States) (search for this): chapter 18
and woods, dreaming little of the fame which was to connect its name forever with the greatest battle of this gigantic campaign. It is situated at the intersection of six roads, two and a half miles east of the Potomac, and one mile west of Antietam Creek, a picturesque mill-stream, which descends from the north, and separates between the rolling hills of the great valley, and the long, sloping ridges which form the western bases of the Blue Ridge, or South Mountain. The roads which centre at toward the mountain. Here, however, General Lee began the formation of his line of battle, on the 15th of September, by placing the divisions of D. H. Hill, Longstreet and Hood upon the range of hills in front of Sharpsburg, and overlooking Antietam Creek. His line was nearly parallel to this stream, and had Longstreet upon the right and Hill upon the left of the road which led to Boonsborough: while Hood's two brigades, stationed upon the left of Hill, extended that wing to the highway leadi
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