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Lexington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
only standing army which the State possessed, was a single company of soldiers, who guarded the public property of the Commonwealth. at the Capitol. Her old militia system, which only required three exceedingly perfunctory drills a year, had, for some time, fallen into desuetude, and was just revived. The Stabt had no men, who possessed any tincture of military training, except a few volunteer companies in her cities, and a few hundred alumni of the military academies at West Point and Lexington. Very few of these companies were armed. The armory of the State was in decay, its machinery rusting, and its arsenal only furnished with a few thousand muskets of antiquated make. The enterprise of private citizens, and the spirit of the country, more advanced than that of their rulers, had indeed led to the arming of a number of volunteer companies, after the attack of John Brown; and for these, a few thousand rifles had been purchased by the parties themselves. But the authorities o
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
liation precipitate the parties into an unsparing slaughter; a result which has only been postponed thus far, by the unexampled forbearance of the people and government of the Confederate States. Meantime, on the 2d of May, Virginia had adopted the Constitution of the Confederate States, appointed Commissioners to their Congress, and thus united her fortunes with theirs. The secession of Virginia gave a second impulse to the revolution, by which the States of North Carolina, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Missouri, and afterwards, in name, Kentucky, were added to the Confederation. On the 20th of May, the Confederate Congress adjourned from Columbia to Richmond, which they had selected as their future capital, and on the 29th of the same month, Mr. Jefferson Davis, the President of the Confederacy, was received in Richmond with unbounded enthusiasm. By a treaty between Virginia and the Confederate Government, the State transferred all her troops and armaments to that power; which eng
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 7
well as at other points of the line, the war-spirit is intense. The cars had scarcely stopped here before a request was made that I would leave a Cadet to drill a company. From Richmond he wrote, April 23d: Colonel Lee of the army is here, and has been made Major-General. His (services) I regard as of more value to us than General Scott could render as commander. (This was an allusion to a report, by which the people had just been excited, that General Winfield Scott, the conqueror of Mexico, and a son of Virginia, was about to return, to espouse the cause of his native State.) It is understood that General Lee is to be Commander-ih-Chief. I regard him as a better officer than General Scott. The Cadets are encamped at the Fair Grounds, which are about one and a half miles from the city. We have excellent quarters. So far as we can hear, God is crowning our cause with success; but I do not wish to send rumors to you. I will try to give facts as they become known; though I m
Pendleton (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
y brow began to congeal with stony rigor, the calm blue eye to kindle with that blaze, steady at once and intense, before which every other eye quailed; and his penalties were so prompt and inexorable, that no one desired to adventure another act of disobedience. His force was ultimately increased by the accession of volunteers from Virginia, and of a few Southern troops, to forty-five hundred men. Ammunition was forwarded to him, additional cannon of heavy calibre were procured, and the Pendleton battery, from his own village, afterwards famous on many a hard-fought field, was added to his command. Several questions of peculiar delicacy were to be handled by him. One was the control of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. From the western boundary of Maryland to the Ohio river, this great thoroughfare passed through the territory of Virginia by two branches. It had opened up to the inhabitants valuable access to the eastern cities, which many of them prized more than liberties, o
Darkesville (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
reported to his Government that he had repulsed 10,000 rebels, with the loss of one man killed. The numerous covered wagons of the Dutch farmers, which went to the rear, with the blood dripping through the seams of the boards, told a different story of his loss. The dead of the Federal army were carefully concealed from their comrades, lest the sight should intimidate the unwarlike rabble. General Patterson occupied Martinsburg while General Johnston remained at the little hamlet of Darkesville, four miles distant, and offered him battle daily. This challenge the Federal general prudently declined. The Confederate commander, on the other hand, refused to gratify the eagerness of his men by attacking him in Martinsburg; for the massive dwellings and warehouses of that town, with the numerous stone-walled enclosures, rendered it a fortified place, of no little strength against an irregular approach. At the end of four days, General Johnston retired to Winchester. On the 15th o
Rockbridge (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ever, and when he expressed his anxieties, replied, Why should the peace of a true Christian be disturbed by anything which man can do unto him? Has not God promised to make all things work together for good to them that love him? The county of Rockbridge, like the rest of the State, was in a blaze of excitement, and its volunteers were arming and hurrying to the scene of action. Now it was that the hold which, notwithstanding his reputation for singularity, Major Jackson had upon the confmmand at Harper's Ferry. The next day this appointment was sent to the Convention for their sanction, when some one asked, Who is this Major Jackson, that we are asked to commit to him so responsible a post? He is one, replied the member from Rockbridge, who, if you order him to hold a post, will never leave it alive to be occupied by the enemy. The Governor accordingly handed him his commission as Colonel, on Saturday, April 27th, and he departed at once for his command. On the way. he wrot
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ts of retaliation precipitate the parties into an unsparing slaughter; a result which has only been postponed thus far, by the unexampled forbearance of the people and government of the Confederate States. Meantime, on the 2d of May, Virginia had adopted the Constitution of the Confederate States, appointed Commissioners to their Congress, and thus united her fortunes with theirs. The secession of Virginia gave a second impulse to the revolution, by which the States of North Carolina, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Missouri, and afterwards, in name, Kentucky, were added to the Confederation. On the 20th of May, the Confederate Congress adjourned from Columbia to Richmond, which they had selected as their future capital, and on the 29th of the same month, Mr. Jefferson Davis, the President of the Confederacy, was received in Richmond with unbounded enthusiasm. By a treaty between Virginia and the Confederate Government, the State transferred all her troops and armaments to that power
Staunton, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
march at one o'clock precisely. This hint against an undue prolongation of the worship was so well observed, that the services were concluded fifteen minutes before that hour. One of his officers, after a few moments' pause, approaching him, said: Major, everything is now ready, may we not set out? To this he made no reply, save to point to the dial-plate of the great clock; and when it was upon the stroke of one, he gave the word: Forward! March! The corps of Cadets was conducted to Staunton, and thence, by railroad, to Richmond, and turned over to the commandant of Camp Lee. During a momentary pause in their journey, on the eastern slope of the Blue Ridge, he wrote to his wife: Here, as well as at other points of the line, the war-spirit is intense. The cars had scarcely stopped here before a request was made that I would leave a Cadet to drill a company. From Richmond he wrote, April 23d: Colonel Lee of the army is here, and has been made Major-General. His (services) I
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
y with each other. It had never been designed for a fortress, and there was nothing whatever of the character of fortifications around it. But as a preliminary point, it was of prime importance to hold it, both to protect Virginia against incursions, and to restrict the convenience of her enemy. Through the gorge opened in the Blue Ridge by the Potomac, passes also the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, the great turnpike road from the regions of the Upper Potomac to the cities of Washington and Baltimore, and the railroad, which constitutes the grand connexion of those cities with the coal-fields whence they draw their fuel, and with the great West. Besides this, the railroad leading southward to Winchester, diverges from Harper's Ferry, and ascends the valley of the Shenandoah. Hence, the occupation of this point, as a focus, was regarded by the government of Virginia, as of radical importance, and it was obviously the advanced post of all her defences. As soon as war became imminen
Charles Town (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
l army from the northwest was reported to be at Romney, forty miles west of Winchester; and General Patterson was crossing the Potomac at Williamsport, nearly the same distance to the north, with 18,000 men. General Johnston having marched to Charlestown, eight miles upon the road to Winchester, turned westward to meet Patterson, and chose a strong defensive position at Bunker Hill, a wooded range of uplands between Winchester and Martinsburg. Upon hearing of this movement, Patterson precipit bank of the Potomac. Colonel Jackson thus described these movements in his letter to his wife:-- Tuesday, June 18.--On Sunday, by order of General Johnston, the entire force left Harper's Ferry, marched towards Winchester, passed through Charlestown, and halted for the night about two miles this side. The next morning we moved towards the enemy, who were between Martinsburg and Williamsport, Ma., and encamped for the night at Bunker Hill. The next morning we were to have marched at sunr
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