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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death.. Search the whole document.

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Mill Springs (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
ctory. They were not taken for what they really were-proofs of the entirely defenseless condition of an immense sweep of coast, in the face of the heavy and increasing naval armament of the United States. They were considered reverses merely; inquiry went but little deeper and the lesson they should have taught was lost; while the inexplicable tardiness of the War Department left still more important points equally defenseless. But the news of General Crittenden's utter defeat at Mill Springs, on the 17th of January of the disastrous results of his miscalculation, or misguided impetuosity, and of the death of Zollicoffercame with stunning effect; opening wide the eyes of the whole country to the condition in which apathy, or mismanagement, had left it. As usual, too, in the popular estimate of a success, or a reverse, the public laid much stress on the death of Zollicoffer, who was a favorite both with them and the army. He was declared uselessly sacrificed, and his comm
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
not have been supplied ten days through other channels, and would have been obliged to abandon its lines and leave Richmond an easy prey. Meanwhile the North had collected large and splendidly-equipped armies of western men in Kentucky and Tennessee, under command of Generals Grant and Buell. The new Federal patent, the Cordon, was about to be applied in earnest. Its coils had already been unpleasantly felt on the Atlantic seaboard; General Butler had flashed his battle blade --that was to gleam, afterward, so bright at Fort Fisher and Dutch Gap-and had prepared an invincible armada for the capture of New Orleans; and simultaneously the armies under Buell were to penetrate into Tennessee and divide the systems of communication between Richmond and the South and West. General Albert Sidney Johnston was sent to meet these preparations, with all the men that could be spared from Western Virginia and the points adjacent to his line of operations. Still his force was very ina
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
parent that proper methods had not been taken to meet the steady and persevering preparations of the North. Disaster after disaster followed the arms of the South in close succession; and the spirits of all classes fell to a depth the more profound, from their elevation of previous joyance. As early as the 29th of the previous August, a naval expedition under Commodore Stringham had, after a short bombardment, reduced the forts at Hatteras Inlet. In the stream of gratulation following Manassas, this small event had been carried out of sight; and even the conquest of Port Royal, South Carolina, by Admiral Dupont's fleet, on the 7th of November, had been looked upon as one of those little mischances that only serve to shade all pictures of general victory. They were not taken for what they really were-proofs of the entirely defenseless condition of an immense sweep of coast, in the face of the heavy and increasing naval armament of the United States. They were considered rever
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
other channels, and would have been obliged to abandon its lines and leave Richmond an easy prey. Meanwhile the North had collected large and splendidly-equipped armies of western men in Kentucky and Tennessee, under command of Generals Grant and Buell. The new Federal patent, the Cordon, was about to be applied in earnest. Its coils had already been unpleasantly felt on the Atlantic seaboard; General Butler had flashed his battle blade --that was to gleam, afterward, so bright at Fort Fisher and Dutch Gap-and had prepared an invincible armada for the capture of New Orleans; and simultaneously the armies under Buell were to penetrate into Tennessee and divide the systems of communication between Richmond and the South and West. General Albert Sidney Johnston was sent to meet these preparations, with all the men that could be spared from Western Virginia and the points adjacent to his line of operations. Still his force was very inadequate in numbers and appointment; while
New Bern (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
eport declared that the disaster lay at the door of the War Department. The almost universal unpopularity of the Secretary made this a most acceptable view, even while an effort was made to shift part of the blame to General Huger's shoulders. But wherever the fault, the country could not shake off the gloom that such a succession of misfortunes threw over it. This feeling was, if possible, increased, and the greatest uneasiness caused in all quarters, by Burnside's capture of Newbern, North Carolina, on the 4th of March. Its defenses had just been completed at heavy cost; but General Branch, with a garrison of some 5,000 men, made a defense that resulted only in complete defeat and the capture of even his field artillery. Here was another point, commanding another supply country of great value to the commissariat, lost to the South. But worse still, its occupation gave the Federals an easy base for striking at the Weldon railroad. Nowhere was the weakness of the South th
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
fety of this road; and a large body of troops diverted for its defense, that elsewhere might have decided many a doubtful battle-field. Their presence was absolutely necessary; for, had they been withdrawn and the road tapped above Weldon, the Virginia army could not have been supplied ten days through other channels, and would have been obliged to abandon its lines and leave Richmond an easy prey. Meanwhile the North had collected large and splendidly-equipped armies of western men in Kentucky and Tennessee, under command of Generals Grant and Buell. The new Federal patent, the Cordon, was about to be applied in earnest. Its coils had already been unpleasantly felt on the Atlantic seaboard; General Butler had flashed his battle blade --that was to gleam, afterward, so bright at Fort Fisher and Dutch Gap-and had prepared an invincible armada for the capture of New Orleans; and simultaneously the armies under Buell were to penetrate into Tennessee and divide the systems of commu
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 20
tream of gratulation following Manassas, this small event had been carried out of sight; and even the conquest of Port Royal, South Carolina, by Admiral Dupont's fleet, on the 7th of November, had been looked upon as one of those little mischances that only serve to shade all pictures of general victory. They were not taken for what they really were-proofs of the entirely defenseless condition of an immense sweep of coast, in the face of the heavy and increasing naval armament of the United States. They were considered reverses merely; inquiry went but little deeper and the lesson they should have taught was lost; while the inexplicable tardiness of the War Department left still more important points equally defenseless. But the news of General Crittenden's utter defeat at Mill Springs, on the 17th of January of the disastrous results of his miscalculation, or misguided impetuosity, and of the death of Zollicoffercame with stunning effect; opening wide the eyes of the whole c
Donelson (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
th scarcely a check to their progress, the Federals reduced and passed Fort Henry on the 4th of February, pressing on to Donelson, into and supporting which work, General Johnston had thrown General J. B. Floyd with some ten thousand troops under Pil with General Pillow and some five thousand men, withdrew in the night and made good his escape. During the siege of Donelson, Johnston evacuated Bowling Green and awaited its issue opposite Nashville. The result being known, it: naturally follohey still placed some credence in any rumors that came. One morning, news reached Richmond of a brilliant victory at Donelson, and it was received with wild rejoicing. Next night the War Department issued the stunning bulletin of the fall of Nasdoning their posts and leaving a junior officer to capitulate in their stead. Certainly the action of these generals at Donelson was somewhat irregular in a strictly military view. But the people argued that they had done all that in them lay; that
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
s of the North. Disaster after disaster followed the arms of the South in close succession; and the spirits of all classes fell to a depth the more profound, from their elevation of previous joyance. As early as the 29th of the previous August, a naval expedition under Commodore Stringham had, after a short bombardment, reduced the forts at Hatteras Inlet. In the stream of gratulation following Manassas, this small event had been carried out of sight; and even the conquest of Port Royal, South Carolina, by Admiral Dupont's fleet, on the 7th of November, had been looked upon as one of those little mischances that only serve to shade all pictures of general victory. They were not taken for what they really were-proofs of the entirely defenseless condition of an immense sweep of coast, in the face of the heavy and increasing naval armament of the United States. They were considered reverses merely; inquiry went but little deeper and the lesson they should have taught was lost;
Bowling Green (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
work, General Johnston had thrown General J. B. Floyd with some ten thousand troops under Pillow and Buckner. After three days hard fighting, Floyd found the position untenable and further resistance impossible. He, therefore, turned over the command to Buckner — who refused to abandon the part of the garrison that could not escape — and, with General Pillow and some five thousand men, withdrew in the night and made good his escape. During the siege of Donelson, Johnston evacuated Bowling Green and awaited its issue opposite Nashville. The result being known, it: naturally followed that this city-undefended by works of any description and with an army inadequate to its protection-had to be abandoned. The retreat was at once commenced; and it was on that: gloomy march that Forrest first made the name that now stands with so few rivals among the cavalry leaders of the world. Commanding a regiment of cavalry from his own section, he seemed as ubiquitous as untiring. Keeping a
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