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Millwood (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
nsburg and Front Royal roads. In front of and to the right of him, for some distance, the country was open. Abraham's Creek runs through a deep valley, and beyond it, on the right, is high open ground, at the intersection of the Front Royal and Millwood roads. To Ramseur's left the country sloped off to the Red Bud, and there were some patches of woods which afforded cover for troops. To the north of the Red Bud, the country is very open, affording facilities for any kind of troops. Towardsalry. Our lines were now formed across from Abraham's Creek to Red Bud and were very attenuated. The enemy was still to be seen in front in formidable force, and away to our right, across Abraham's Creek, at the junction of the Front Royal and Millwood roads, he had massed a division of cavalry with some artillery, overlapping us at least a mile, while the country was open between this force and the Valley Pike and Cedar Creek Pike back of the latter; which roads furnished my only means of re
Bunker Hill (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
Chapter 45: battle of Winchester. At light on the morning of the 19th, our cavalry pickets, at the crossing of the Opequon on the Berryville road, were driven in, and information having been sent me of that fact, I immediately ordered all the troops at Stephenson's depot to be in readiness to move, directions being given for Gordon, who had arrived from Bunker Hill, to move at once, but by some mistake on the part of my staff officer, the latter order was not delivered to General Breckenridge or Gordon. I rode at once to Ramseur's position, and found his troops in line across the Berryville road skirmishing with the enemy. Before reaching this point, I had ascertained that Gordon was not moving and sent back for him, and now discovering that the enemy's advance was a real one and in heavy force, I sent orders for Breckenridge and Rodes to move up as rapidly as possible. The position occupied by Ramseur was about one mile and a half out from Winchester, on an elevated plateau
Abraham's Creek (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
ut one mile and a half out from Winchester, on an elevated plateau between Abraham's Creek and Red Bud Run. Abraham's Creek crosses the Valley Pike one mile south ofAbraham's Creek crosses the Valley Pike one mile south of Winchester, and then crosses the Front Royal road about the same distance southeast of the town, and running eastwardly, on the southern side of the Berryville roaront of and to the right of him, for some distance, the country was open. Abraham's Creek runs through a deep valley, and beyond it, on the right, is high open groun's cavalry and part of Johnson's was on the right, watching the valley of Abraham's Creek, and the Front Royal road beyond, while Fitz. Lee was on the left, across emained his heavy force of cavalry. Our lines were now formed across from Abraham's Creek to Red Bud and were very attenuated. The enemy was still to be seen in front in formidable force, and away to our right, across Abraham's Creek, at the junction of the Front Royal and Millwood roads, he had massed a division of cavalry w
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
and there were some patches of woods which afforded cover for troops. To the north of the Red Bud, the country is very open, affording facilities for any kind of troops. Towards the Opequon, on the front, the Berryville road runs through a ravine with hills and woods on each side, which enabled the enemy to move his troops under cover, and mask them out of range of artillery. Nelson's artillery was posted on Ramseur's line, covering the approaches as far as practicable, and Lomax with Jackson's cavalry and part of Johnson's was on the right, watching the valley of Abraham's Creek, and the Front Royal road beyond, while Fitz. Lee was on the left, across the Red Bud, with his cavalry and a battery of horse artillery; and a detachment of Johnson's cavalry watched the interval between Ramseur's left and the Red Bud. These troops held the enemy's main force in check until Gordon's and Rodes' divisions arrived from Stephenson's depot. Gordon's division arrived first, a little afte
Newtown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
to retire through Winchester, and Ramseur's division, which maintained its organization, was moved on the east of the town to the south side of it, and put in position, forming a basis for a new line, while the other troops moved back through the town. Wickham's brigade, with some pieces of horse artillery on Fort Hill, covered this movement and checked the pursuit of the enemy's cavalry. When the new line was formed, the enemy's advance was checked until nightfall, and we then retired to Newtown without serious molestation. Lomax had held the enemy's cavalry on the Front Royal road in check, and a feeble attempt at pursuit was repulsed by Ramseur near Kernstown. As soon as our reverse began, orders had been sent for the removal of the trains, stores and sick and wounded in the hospitals to Fisher's Hill over the Cedar Creek Pike and the Back Road. This was done with safety, and all the wounded, except such as were not in a condition to be moved, and those which had not been b
Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
ies into the Opequon. Red Bud Run crosses the Martinsburg road about a mile and a half north of Winchester watching the enemy's cavalry on the right, on the Martinsburg road and the Opequon. The enemy had a fresh corpot reach the Front Royal road on the right or the Martinsburg road on the left. When the order was sent for right, and a column of his cavalry moving up the Martinsburg road on the left. After much difficulty, and someeded in extricating his force, and moving up the Martinsburg road to join me, but he did not reach the field uivision was left to aid Fitz. Lee in guarding the Martinsburg road, against the force of cavalry which was advathe small force which had been watching it on the Martinsburg road, and Crook's corps, which had not been engaforce of the enemy's cavalry then swept along the Martinsburg road to the very skirts of Winchester, thus getti in rear of our left and at right angles with the Martinsburg road, and another charge of the enemy's cavalry w
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
cupied by Ramseur was about one mile and a half out from Winchester, on an elevated plateau between Abraham's Creek and Red raham's Creek crosses the Valley Pike one mile south of Winchester, and then crosses the Front Royal road about the same dies the Martinsburg road about a mile and a half north of Winchester and runs eastwardly, on the northern side of the Berryvin swept along the Martinsburg road to the very skirts of Winchester, thus getting in the rear of our left flank. Wharton's line of breastworks, which had been made just outside of Winchester during the first year of the war, and, with the aid of t right, and was in position on Fort Hill just outside of Winchester on the west. Just after the advance of the enemy's infamedy. Nothing now was left for us but to retire through Winchester, and Ramseur's division, which maintained its organizati a feeble attempt at pursuit was repulsed by Ramseur near Kernstown. As soon as our reverse began, orders had been sent f
Fishers Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
Hill, covered this movement and checked the pursuit of the enemy's cavalry. When the new line was formed, the enemy's advance was checked until nightfall, and we then retired to Newtown without serious molestation. Lomax had held the enemy's cavalry on the Front Royal road in check, and a feeble attempt at pursuit was repulsed by Ramseur near Kernstown. As soon as our reverse began, orders had been sent for the removal of the trains, stores and sick and wounded in the hospitals to Fisher's Hill over the Cedar Creek Pike and the Back Road. This was done with safety, and all the wounded, except such as were not in a condition to be moved, and those which had not been brought from the field, were carried to the rear. This battle, beginning with the skirmishing in Ramseur's front, had lasted from daylight till dark, and, at the close of it, we had been forced back two miles, after having repulsed the enemy's first attack with great slaughter to him and subsequently contested e
Front Royal (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
Valley Pike one mile south of Winchester, and then crosses the Front Royal road about the same distance southeast of the town, and running t, on the right, is high open ground, at the intersection of the Front Royal and Millwood roads. To Ramseur's left the country sloped off tas on the right, watching the valley of Abraham's Creek, and the Front Royal road beyond, while Fitz. Lee was on the left, across the Red Budway to our right, across Abraham's Creek, at the junction of the Front Royal and Millwood roads, he had massed a division of cavalry with so of retreat in the event of disaster. My line did not reach the Front Royal road on the right or the Martinsburg road on the left. When cable and was expecting such a movement from the cavalry on the Front Royal road, I gave the order to retire, but instantly discovering that serious molestation. Lomax had held the enemy's cavalry on the Front Royal road in check, and a feeble attempt at pursuit was repulsed by R
Charles Town (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
n between this force and the Valley Pike and Cedar Creek Pike back of the latter; which roads furnished my only means of retreat in the event of disaster. My line did not reach the Front Royal road on the right or the Martinsburg road on the left. When the order was sent for the troops to move from Stephenson's depot, General Breckenridge had moved to the front, with Wharton's division and King's artillery, to meet a cavalry force, which had driven our pickets from the Opequon on the Charlestown road, and that division had become heavily engaged with the enemy, and sustained and repulsed several determined charges of his cavalry, while his own flanks were in great danger from the enemy's main force on the right, and a column of his cavalry moving up the Martinsburg road on the left. After much difficulty, and some hard fighting, General Breckenridge succeeded in extricating his force, and moving up the Martinsburg road to join me, but he did not reach the field until about two o
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