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Austria (Austria) (search for this): chapter 6
wo brigades. At noon all Longstreet's dispositions were made; his troops for attack were deployed into line, and lying down in the woods; his batteries were ready to open. The general then dismounted and went to sleep for a short time. The Austrian officer and I now rode off to get, if possible, into some commanding position from whence we could see the whole thing without being exposed to the tremendous fire which was about to commence. After riding about for half an hour without being f by all. Stuart's cavalry can hardly be called cavalry in the European sense of the word; but, on the other hand, the country in which they are accustomed to operate is not adapted for cavalry. ----was forced at last to give up wearing even his Austrian forage-cap; for the last two days soldiers on the line of march had been visiting his ambulance in great numbers, under the impression (encouraged by the driver) that he was a Yankee general. The idea now was that the army would remain some day
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
elt quite sorry when I said good-by to so many gentlemen from whom I had received so much disinterested kindness. I am now about to leave the Southern States, after travel ling quite alone throughout their entire length and breadth, including Texas and the transMissis-sippi country, for nearly three months and a half, during which time I have been thrown amongst all classes of the population — the highest and lowest, and the most lawless. Although many were very sore about the conduct of Ell bargain for its lasting at least all Lincoln's presidency. Although I have always been with the Confederates in the time of their misfortunes, yet I never heard any person use a desponding word as to the result of the struggle. When I was in Texas and Louisiana, Banks seemed to be carrying every thing before him, Grant was doing the same in Mississippi, and I certainly did not bring luck to my friends at Gettysburg. I have lived in bivouacs with all the Southern armies, which are as disti
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ront of the door of General Kelly's quarters, and to my immense relief I soon discovered that he was a gentleman. I then explained to him the whole truth, concealing nothing. I said I was a British officer on leave of absence, travelling for my own instruction; that I had been all the way to Mexico, and entered the Southern States by the Rio Grande, for the express purpose of not breaking any legally established blockade. I told him I had visited all the Southern armies in Mississippi, Tennessee, Charleston, and Virginia, and seen the late campaign as General Longstreet's guest, but had in no way entered the Confederate service. I also gave him my word that I had not got in my possession any letters, either public or private, from any person in the South to any person anywhere else. I showed him my British passport and General Lee's pass as a British officer; and I explained that my only object in coming North was to return to England in time for the expiration of my leave; and
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
n; that I had been all the way to Mexico, and entered the Southern States by the Rio Grande, for the express purpose of not breaking any legally established blockade. I told him I had visited all the Southern armies in Mississippi, Tennessee, Charleston, and Virginia, and seen the late campaign as General Longstreet's guest, but had in no way entered the Confederate service. I also gave him my word that I had not got in my possession any letters, either public or private, from any person in t son of them drowned there. I arrived at New York at 10 P. M., and drove to the Fifth Avenue Hotel. 13th July, 1863 (Monday). The luxury and comfort of New York and Philadelphia strike one as extraordinary after having lately come from Charleston and Richmond. The greenbacks seem to be nearly as good as gold. The streets are as full as possible of well-dressed people, and are crowded with able-bodied civilians capable of bearing arms, who have evidently no intention of doing so. They
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
the raid made by the enemy, for the express purpose of arresting his badly wounded son (a Confederate Brigadier-general), who was lying in the house of a relation in Virginia. They insisted upon carrying him off in a litter, though he had never been out of bed, and had quite recently been shot through the thigh. This seizure was evidently made for purposes of retaliation. His life has since been threatened, in the event of the South retaliating for Burnside's alleged military murders in Kentucky. But few officers, however, speak of the Northerners with so much moderation as General Lee; his extreme amiability seems to prevent his speaking strongly against any one. I really felt quite sorry when I said good-by to so many gentlemen from whom I had received so much disinterested kindness. I am now about to leave the Southern States, after travel ling quite alone throughout their entire length and breadth, including Texas and the transMissis-sippi country, for nearly three month
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ad to pass our quarters on its march towards Gettysburg. One division of Ewell's also had to join irm the peculiar feature of the country round Gettysburg. We could see the enemy retreating up one o, on the top of a high ridge to the right of Gettysburg, as we looked at it. General Hill now cae evening for a regular attack. The town of Gettysburg was now occupied by Ewell, and was full of Y Cashtown, a little village eight miles from Gettysburg. At that time troops were pouring along theuarters in a church (with a high cupola) at Gettysburg; Hill in the centre; and Longstreet on the r, we determined to make for the cupola, near Gettysburg, Ewell's headquarters. Just before we reaching through the toll-gate at the entrance of Gettysburg, we found that we had got into a heavy crossin, or found out who he was. The road at Gettysburg was lined with Yankee dead, and as they had ertainly did not bring luck to my friends at Gettysburg. I have lived in bivouacs with all the Sout[4 more...]
Vienna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
o constantly, and under so many disadvantages. 2d July, 1863 (Thursday). We all got up at 3.30 A. M., and breakfasted a little before daylight. Lawley in sisted on riding, notwithstanding his illness. Captain -- and I were in a dilemma for horses; but I was accommodated by Major Clark (of this Staff), whilst the stout Austrian was mounted by Major Walton. The Austrian, in spite of the early hour, had shaved his cheeks and cired his mustaches as beautifully as if he was on parade at Vienna. Colonel Sorrell, the Austrian, and I arrived at 5 A. M. at the same commanding position we were on yesterday, and I climbed up a tree in company with Captain Schreibert of the Prussian army. Just below us were seated Generals Lee, Hill, Longstreet, and Hood, in consultation — the two latter assisting their deliberations by the truly American custom of whittling sticks. General Heth was also present; he was wounded in the head yesterday, and althoug h not allowed to command his brigade
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
y, sent in by General Stuart, and captured, it is understood, by his cavalry, which had penetrated to within 6 miles of Washington. 3d July, 1863 (Friday). At 6 A. M. I rode to the field with Colonel Manning, and went over that portion of the gy said, We've not lost confidence in the old man: this day's work won't do him no harm. Uncle Robert will get us into Washington yet; you bet he will! &c. Whilst we were talking, the enemy's skirmishers began to advance slowly, and several ominous cottage was full of soldiers, none of whom had the slightest idea of the contemplated retreat, and all were talking of Washington and Baltimore with the greatest confidence. At 2 P. M. we walked to General Longstreet's camp, which had been removmanner, when one of their most prosperous States had been so recently laid under contribution as far as Harrisburg; and Washington, their capital itself, having just been saved by a fortunate turn of luck. Fourfifths of the Pennsylvanian spoil had s
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
lines for the first time since I had been in America. Immediately afterwards we began to be asked all sorts of inquisitive questions about the rebels, which I left to my driver to answer. It became perfectly evident that this narrow strip of Maryland is entirely Unionist. At about 12 o'clock we reached the top of a high hill, and halted to bait our horse at an inn called Fairview. No sooner had we descended from the buggy than about twenty rampageous Unionists appeared, who told us they All this sounded very absurd to me, who had left Lee's army four days previously as full of fight as ever-much stronger in numbers, and ten times more efficient in every military point of view, than it was when it crossed the Potomac to invade Maryland a year ago. In its own opinion, Lee's army has not lost any of its prestige at the battle of Gettysburg, in which it most gallantly stormed strong intrenchments defended by the whole army of the Potomac, which never ventured outside its works, o
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ourse, could make no difference to General Lee's plan: ammunition he must have-he had failed to capture it from the enemy (according to precedent); and as his communications with Virginia were intercepted, he was compelled to fall back towards Winchester, and draw his supplies from thence. General Milroy had kindly left an ample stock at that town when he made his precipitate exit some weeks ago. The army was also incumbered with an enormous wagon-train, the spoils of Pennsylvania, which it issiting his ambulance in great numbers, under the impression (encouraged by the driver) that he was a Yankee general. The idea now was that the army would remain some days in or near its present position until the arrival of the ammunition from Winchester. 7th July, 1863 (Tuesday). -Lawley, the Austrian, and I drove into Hagerstown this morning, and General Longstreet moved into a new position on the Williamsport road, which he was to occupy for the present. We got an excellent room in th
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