hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
A. P. Collins 38 4 Browse Search
Macon (Georgia, United States) 32 4 Browse Search
Ohio (Ohio, United States) 28 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 26 0 Browse Search
Clay Crawford 23 7 Browse Search
Virginia (Virginia, United States) 22 0 Browse Search
John James Geer 20 2 Browse Search
Darien, Ga. (Georgia, United States) 20 0 Browse Search
Shiloh, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) 20 0 Browse Search
Bragg 19 5 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of John James Geer, Beyond the lines: A Yankee prisoner loose in Dixie. Search the whole document.

Found 41 total hits in 24 results.

1 2 3
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
masked brow, his lifted hand disarms; But wrapped in night, with terrors all his own, He speaks in thunders when the deed is done; Hear him, ye Senates, hear this truth sublime,-- He who allows oppression shares the crime. That night our prayer-meeting — which was no longer secret — was one of the happiest we ever enjoyed. I found that, like myself, all had heard of the proclamation, and we all reverently thanked God for it. Next to me was an old negro who had been taken prisoner in East Tennessee. He had originally been freed by his master, a wealthy Georgian planter. When this son of Africa prayed, he let himself out in all the power and exuberance of his strong but uneducated mind. O, good Lord! cried he, don't let off de steam, but put on more steam, 0, good Lord! and don't put on de brakes; but run her right up to de fust of January! And den 0, good, blessed Lord, my wife'll be free! Tank God! glory! Amen! God send down de power! Amen, and amen! As this earnest
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
they intended to throw the corpse, and cart it away like some animal's carcass. At this, the Colonel of his regiment, Colonel Shaw, earnestly requested that we might be allowed to bear the body, and thus prevent the insult offered to the dead. This request had the effect of causing the officers to send for a light wagon, and in this was our sleeping brother and comrade soldier carried to his long home, followed by myself and a companion or two. Gentle be his slumbers beneath the sods of Georgia's soil! Unfortunately, among some other papers, I lost that on which I had taken the address of Mr. Eckels's mother, and have, therefore, as yet, been unable to fulfill my promise to visit her. Nothing would give me more pleasure than to see this dear old lady, and tell her what a glorious death-bed was that of her son. Since my return home, I have frequently heard a sweet song, the words of which picture before me the last hours of Mr. Eckels. How touchingly appropriate to the dying b
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
er, took our sick brother by the hand, and led him from out the noisome prison to the mansions above, where care comes not, and where sickness is not known. He died at half past 10 o'clock, P. M., on August 22, 1862. For several days prior to his death, I was constantly by him, and was much gratified with the manifestations he gave of preparation for the future. Brother Eckels gave me the name of the church in Iowa to which he belonged, also the names of his mother and sister, who lived in Ohio. He requested me to visit the latter. His thoughts were centred solely upon heaven and his mother, and in his moments of revival he would often repeat the lines: My mother, at thy holy name, Within my bosom is a gush Of feeling, which no time can tame, And which, for worlds of fame, I would not, could not crush. Brother Eckels's end was indeed one of peace and bright serenity. At his request I preached his funeral sermon the day succeeding his death, from the text, They that sleep
Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
it came rather hard on him to be obliged to get his own place ready to sleep in. I say place, for our quarters were entirely innocent of a bed, and if we took turns sleeping on a blanket, we considered ourselves lucky. In the morning he spent some time in rising, for it needed his utmost efforts to get his vast body to an upright position. His exertions ruffled his temper exceedingly, and as the perspiration poured down his face, he muttered to himself over and over again: Now, old Henry, you've got yourself in a h-l of a fix, aint you, you d-d old fool! Notwithstanding, this old man was very gentlemanly in his deportment. Among a batch that had lately arrived, was a man whom the rebels were endeavoring to force to take the oath of allegiance to the Southern Confederacy. But his wife, who had been confined just after his arrest, fearing that his regard for her condition might induce him to submit to what was demanded, sent her son, who was only eight years old, to tell
Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
his sickness was unto death. The God who sent his angel to free his apostle Peter, took our sick brother by the hand, and led him from out the noisome prison to the mansions above, where care comes not, and where sickness is not known. He died at half past 10 o'clock, P. M., on August 22, 1862. For several days prior to his death, I was constantly by him, and was much gratified with the manifestations he gave of preparation for the future. Brother Eckels gave me the name of the church in Iowa to which he belonged, also the names of his mother and sister, who lived in Ohio. He requested me to visit the latter. His thoughts were centred solely upon heaven and his mother, and in his moments of revival he would often repeat the lines: My mother, at thy holy name, Within my bosom is a gush Of feeling, which no time can tame, And which, for worlds of fame, I would not, could not crush. Brother Eckels's end was indeed one of peace and bright serenity. At his request I preache
our companions had met their fate. He told us, like brave men. The next day, we onversed with the guards who were guarding us, with one in particular, who described the scenes of the execution. He told us of a speech of one of these men, named Wilson, from my regiment, on the scaffold. He told us, also, that two of the heaviest men had broken the ropes by which they were suspended, and fell to the ground. They afterwards revived, and asked for a drink of water; which being given to them, thand asked for a drink of water; which being given to them, they requested an hour to prepare for death, and pray before they were again hung up. Their request was refused, and, as soon as the ropes could be re-adjusted, they were compelled to re-ascend the scaffold. The guard told me that Mr. Wilson had spoken very calmly; had told them they were all in the wrong; that they would yet see the time when the old Union would be restored, and the flag of our country would wave over all that region.
Chapter 18: The slave's Ruse the Richmond Enquirer President's Proclamation a negro prayer a Big Bug a Casibianca death of Mr. Eckles thoughts and plans of escape Lieutenant Pittenger. The next day after this occurrence, as I was walking in the yard, a negro, who worked in the prison, slyly pulled me as I was passing him, and exclaimed in an under-tone: All us darkies gwine to be free, yah! yah! What? asked I, taking care to avoid being seen by the guards. Why, all us nigs gwine to be free, yah! yah! gin us yer coat, massa! I fully understood this coat business, as the reader must be aware from an explanation previously given, but, as I had no coat myself, I went to Captain McCormick, my messmate, and got his. It very fortunately had a long rip in the right sleeve. Here, nigger, cried I, in loud tones, can't you get this coat mended? Mended! exclaimed, the intelligent fellow, in assumed tones of wrath, intended for the guards. I w
his occurrence, as I was walking in the yard, a negro, who worked in the prison, slyly pulled me as I was passing him, and exclaimed in an under-tone: All us darkies gwine to be free, yah! yah! What? asked I, taking care to avoid being seen by the guards. Why, all us nigs gwine to be free, yah! yah! gin us yer coat, massa! I fully understood this coat business, as the reader must be aware from an explanation previously given, but, as I had no coat myself, I went to Captain McCormick, my messmate, and got his. It very fortunately had a long rip in the right sleeve. Here, nigger, cried I, in loud tones, can't you get this coat mended? Mended! exclaimed, the intelligent fellow, in assumed tones of wrath, intended for the guards. I wish dar wus no Yankees! dere more bodder den dar wuff! good deal! Go get it mended for him, you black skunk! exclaimed one of the guard, and make him pay well for't. Dat's jes what dis yere nigger'll do, I golly! The
Simeon B. Eckels (search for this): chapter 20
t was glorious for the soul to bask in that heavenly sunlight which God thus shed upon us in our dreary prison. About this time, I became acquainted with Simeon B. Eckels. He was very sick, and requested me often to pray for him. Our friendship was as cordial as it was short, for his sickness was unto death. The God who sent or two. Gentle be his slumbers beneath the sods of Georgia's soil! Unfortunately, among some other papers, I lost that on which I had taken the address of Mr. Eckels's mother, and have, therefore, as yet, been unable to fulfill my promise to visit her. Nothing would give me more pleasure than to see this dear old lady, and that a glorious death-bed was that of her son. Since my return home, I have frequently heard a sweet song, the words of which picture before me the last hours of Mr. Eckels. How touchingly appropriate to the dying breath of this Christian hero, were the lines: Soon with angels I'll be marching, With bright laurels on my brow-
The General's party, headed by him, dashed back, and hid themselves in the cellar where we used to hold our prayermeetings, while we reached our own room in safety. A Tennesseean tore up a plank from our floor, and succeeded in getting one, Lieutenant Ward, up out of the cellar beneath; but, ere another could be assisted thus, the guards had captured the fugitives, and marched them out into the yard. A short time afterward, they were brought back into the room in which we were, amid the jokes and laughs of the rest of the prisoners at their non-success. A few hours after daylight, a guard of fifteen or twenty men marched in and took General Prentiss, Captain Gaddus, Major Ward, and several others into custody. Where they took them we did not know; but, a few days subsequently, I heard through Dolph, the black boy, that they were put into a common jail, and chained to the floor. From the description he gave of it, their condition must indeed have been horrible. Think of th
1 2 3