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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 21
On one point, however, I fully agree with him. Let the proud Americans learn that all parties in this country unite in condemnation of their present conduct, and let them also learn that the worst of all aristocracies is that which prevails in America, an aristocracy which has been aptly denominated that of the human skin. The most insufferable pride is that shown by such an aristocracy. I will continue to hurl these taunts across the Atlantic. They will ascend the Mississippi, they will d Truth is Christian liberty, unalloyed and untrammeled, the Pilgrim fathers' treasure; that is the citizen-children's inheritance, and it shall be perpetuated. The Mayflower weathered the storms of a December Atlantic. The blood she brought to America courses now in so many veins, and the spirit-life at Plymouth planted, is to-day so thrilling all true Christian hearts, that this strife must end in proclamation of a Gospel to the poor. These we have with us always. Let the people — the whol
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
lins, who had treated me so well, I refrained, and listened for some time to the hoary-headed coward in silence. A line of female negroes as long as our own, stood close to us watching us, and commented upon our appearance. While thus engaged, a little dog made his way through them, and commenced barking at, and playing with one of our number, a captain from Missouri. The captain patted the little animal, and said, in half-joking tones: Well, puppy, I've got one friend in South Carolina, anyhow. At this, the old man rushed up to the prisoner, and exclaimed: What are you talking about? Them things'll hang you before you leave this place! Whom do you think he's talking to, sir? I asked, in stem tones. He's talking to them niggers, and he shall hang for it, before he leaves the place. Just then, one of our number said sarcastically: Ah, now, my dear old gentleman, you are altogether mistaken. He's not talking to your children, but your dog!
Aiken's Landing (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
p from the floor. They did not notice my question, but like sailors weighing anchor, wrenched again at me, exclaiming: We'll fetch him clear this poke! heave ho! yo! ho! I had positively stuck so fast to the floor, that it was only after the most strenuous exertions I succeeded in getting loose, even with the aid of my two rough helpers. Our descriptive list did not come until ten o'clock; but when it did, we were not long in signing it, after which we were taken to Aiken's Landing, some fourteen miles southeast of Richmond. Though a cold rain was still falling at intervals, I did not complain, for I was going home,--thank God! home! Oh, how overflowing was my heart with joy at the prospect! Every drop of rain that pattered on my shivering form, fell upon me like the summer shower falls upon the parched and thirsty grass. I did not complain that I had to march the whole fourteen miles through the cold, mud, and snow, in my bare feet, for I knew that this w
Salisbury, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
whole crowd of d-d Yankees at once, and on the spot. Captain Collins, at length, thinking that he had amused himself long enough, quietly took hold of him, and passed him over to the guards, who, however, were unable to appease him, until they jagged a sharp bayonet into that delicate portion of his corporeal organization, where, doubtless, his feelings and his brains were seated. We were soon after on our way to the capital of North Carolina. On our journey thither, we stopped at Salisbury, where many a Yankee head was thrust out at the car-windows in hopes of attracting the attention of some of the kindhearted negroes. My unshorn beard and stragling hair, charmed a pretty yellow maiden to such an extent that she drew near and said: Are you a Yankee, sah? Yes, replied I, determined to profit by the opportunity, and I'm a very hungry Yankee! God bless you, sah! I'll go an' git you a possum leg dis minnit. With these words, she flew away, but soon returned,
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
and my temper, not being much cooler, I felt inclined to admonish this old rebel a little. But, not wishing to offend Captain Collins, who had treated me so well, I refrained, and listened for some time to the hoary-headed coward in silence. A line of female negroes as long as our own, stood close to us watching us, and commented upon our appearance. While thus engaged, a little dog made his way through them, and commenced barking at, and playing with one of our number, a captain from Missouri. The captain patted the little animal, and said, in half-joking tones: Well, puppy, I've got one friend in South Carolina, anyhow. At this, the old man rushed up to the prisoner, and exclaimed: What are you talking about? Them things'll hang you before you leave this place! Whom do you think he's talking to, sir? I asked, in stem tones. He's talking to them niggers, and he shall hang for it, before he leaves the place. Just then, one of our number said sar
Kingville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
e were very glad. The whites, as well as the negroes, crowded about our cars, and among other questions, we were asked: Well, whar did they dun get you? What do you uns tink you uns'll dun down here? We uns have dun been waiting for you uns. From this place to Columbia, South Carolina, we were received much in the same manner by all the inhabitants. Thence we took the Charleston railroad to Branchville, from which place, starting due east, we struck the Wilmington road at Kingsville. At Columbia, we were placed for safe-keeping in the State Prison, while arrangements were being made in regard to the cartel. As it was supposed that we would soon be within our own lines, more liberty than usual was allowed us, of which I took advantage by requesting to be allowed to go about the town under guard. My wish was granted. As I was walking along, I overheard two men talking of a young lady and two gentlemen who had just been put into cells. There was an apple-stand ne
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 21
roud Americans learn that all parties in this country unite in condemnation of their present conduct, and let them also learn that the worst of all aristocracies is that which prevails in America, an aristocracy which has been aptly denominated that of the human skin. The most insufferable pride is that shown by such an aristocracy. I will continue to hurl these taunts across the Atlantic. They will ascend the Mississippi, they will descend the Missouri, and be heard along the banks of the Ohio and Monongahela till the black man leaps delightedly to express his gratitude to those who have effected his emancipation. And oh! but perhaps it is my pride that dictates this hope, that some black O'Connell may rise among his fellow-slaves, who will cry agitate! agitate! agitate! till the two millions and a half of his fellow-sufferers learn their strength, learn that they are two millions and a half! If there is one thing more than another which can excite my hatred, it is the laws wh
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
eyes, and there, in the distance, I beheld the glorious old Stars and Stripes floating proudly and beautifully upon the breeze. There she is! God bless her stars! burst from two hundred and sixty throats in one breath of relief. The very clouds seemed to break asunder and let the glorious sun down upon our enfranchised souls. We wept, and laughed, and shook hands, and bounded with delight, until some time after we were taken aboard the Federal transport, which had been sent up the James river for us. We were soon tossing on the ocean, and in due time arrived without accident at Washington. My first act upon landing and reaching Willard's Hotel, was to secure the services of a photographer, who took myself and comrade with the chain about our necks, and in our rebel rags, exactly as is represented in the engraving. The next important operation was to clean myself, trim my beard and hair, and make myself fit to go into decent society. This was by no means a small undertaki
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 21
children without bread, and satisfied what our fathers thought an untrammeled Pulpit Clay-eaters commissioners to Washington homeward bound an Irate Southron my yellow angel our journey an accident Jeff Davis' Coffin Don't know myself song the elms in the yards and gardens there, so early in the morning, must strike higher, gladder notes of praise. Now Washington is safe. Let the conquest circle the Republic until the waves of the Gulf and the rippling Rio Grande shall have the sprivilege was stopped every few days, so that it was always altogether uncertain. Commissioners having been sent to Washington, in relation to the matter of exchanges by cartel, they returned, and brought with them to General Prentiss several hunhad been sent up the James river for us. We were soon tossing on the ocean, and in due time arrived without accident at Washington. My first act upon landing and reaching Willard's Hotel, was to secure the services of a photographer, who took mys
Branchville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
ollins, whom I have mentioned just before, still had us, in his charge, of which we were very glad. The whites, as well as the negroes, crowded about our cars, and among other questions, we were asked: Well, whar did they dun get you? What do you uns tink you uns'll dun down here? We uns have dun been waiting for you uns. From this place to Columbia, South Carolina, we were received much in the same manner by all the inhabitants. Thence we took the Charleston railroad to Branchville, from which place, starting due east, we struck the Wilmington road at Kingsville. At Columbia, we were placed for safe-keeping in the State Prison, while arrangements were being made in regard to the cartel. As it was supposed that we would soon be within our own lines, more liberty than usual was allowed us, of which I took advantage by requesting to be allowed to go about the town under guard. My wish was granted. As I was walking along, I overheard two men talking of a young la
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