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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 17
uniformed. They came to me to get a description of the United States uniform for infantry; subscribed and bought the materiaby the State, but pledged to go into the service of the United States if there should be a further call during their term. Eit. In time the Galena company was mustered into the United States service, forming a part of the 11th Illinois volunteer e raising of troops or commissioned officers to protect United States property, but Blair had probably procured some form of in Missouri and to muster them into the service of the United States. At all events, he did raise a regiment and took commadier-General John Pope was stationed at Springfield, as United States mustering officer, all the time I was in the State serv one occasion he said to me that I ought to go into the United States service. I told him I intended to do so if there was aalena, Illinois, May 24, 1861 Col. L. Thomas, Adjt. Gen. U. S. A., Washington, D. C. Sir: Having served for fifteen year
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
oln was sworn to maintain the Union against all its enemies. The secession of one State after another followed, until eleven had gone out. On the 11th of April Fort Sumter, a National fort in the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina, was fired upon by the Southerners and a few days after was captured. The Confederates proclaimed Charleston, South Carolina, was fired upon by the Southerners and a few days after was captured. The Confederates proclaimed themselves aliens, and thereby debarred themselves of all right to claim protection under the Constitution of the United States. We did not admit the fact that they were aliens, but all the same, they debarred themselves of the right to expect better treatment than people of any other foreign state who make war upon an independenfor troops and soon after a proclamation convening Congress in extra session. The call was for 75,000 volunteers for ninety days service. If the shot fired at Fort Sumter was heard around the world, the call of the President for 75,000 men was heard throughout the Northern States. There was not a state in the North of a million
Covington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
in suggesting rank as high as the colonelcy of a regiment, feeling somewhat doubtful whether I would be equal to the position. But I had seen nearly every colonel who had been mustered in from the State of Illinois, and some from Indiana, and felt that if they could command a regiment properly, and with credit, I could also. Having but little to do after the muster of the last of the regiments authorized by the State legislature, I asked and obtained of the governor leave of absence for a week to visit my parents in Covington, Kentucky, immediately opposite Cincinnati. General McClellan had been made a major-general and had his headquarters at Cincinnati. In reality I wanted to see him. I had known him slightly at West Point, where we served one year together, and in the Mexican war. I was in hopes that when he saw me he would offer me a position on his staff. I called on two successive days.at his office but failed to see him on either occasion, and returned to Springfield.
Springfield (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
men all turned out the morning after their enlistment, and I took charge, divided them into squads and superintended their drill. When they were ready to go to Springfield I went with them [April 25] and remained there until they were assigned to a regiment. There were so many more volunteers than had been called for that the time the Galena company was mustered into the United States service, forming a part of the 11th Illinois volunteer infantry. My duties, I thought, had ended at Springfield, and I was prepared to start home by the evening train, leaving at nine o'clock. Up to that time I do not think I had been introduced to Governor Yates, or had of this State, rendering such aid as I could in the organization of our State militia, and am still engaged in that capacity. A letter addressed to me at Springfield, Illinois, will reach me. I am very respectfully, Your obt. svt., U. S. Grant This letter failed to elicit an answer from the Adjutant-General of the Army. I presum
Galena (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
cessary. As soon as the news of the call for volunteers reached Galena [April 18], posters were stuck up calling for a meeting of the citized, and expressed, I understood afterwards, a little surprise that Galena could not furnish a presiding officer for such an occasion without upposed that one company would be as much as would be accepted from Galena. The company was raised and the officers and non-commissioned offieeting, to put up a package or do other business. The ladies of Galena were quite as patriotic as the men. They could not enlist, but they, I only became acquainted at the meeting when the first company of Galena volunteers was raised. Foulk I had known in St. Louis when I was aor two soon after this conversation with General Pope, I wrote from Galena the following letter to the Adjutant-General of the Army. GalenGalena, Illinois, May 24, 1861 Col. L. Thomas, Adjt. Gen. U. S. A., Washington, D. C. Sir: Having served for fifteen years in the regular army,
Mattoon, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
re not so intolerant in St. Louis as we might be; I had not seen a single rebel hung yet, nor heard of one; there were plenty of them who ought to be, however. The young man subsided. He was so crestfallen that I believe if I had ordered him to leave the car he would have gone quietly out, saying to himself: More Yankee oppression. By nightfall the late defenders of Camp Jackson were all within the walls of the St. Louis arsenal, prisoners of war. The next day I left St. Louis for Mattoon, Illinois, where I was to muster in the regiment from that congressional district. This was the 21st Illinois infantry, the regiment of which I subsequently became colonel. I mustered one regiment afterwards, when my services for the State were about closed. Brigadier-General John Pope was stationed at Springfield, as United States mustering officer, all the time I was in the State service. He was a native of Illinois and well acquainted with most of the prominent men in the State. I was
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
e Hon. F. P. Blair, I have little doubt that St. Louis would have gone into rebel hands, and with it the arsenal with all its arms and ammunition. Blair was a leader among the Union men of St. Louis in 1861. There was no State government in Missouri at the time that would sanction the raising of troops or commissioned officers to protect United States property, but Blair had probably procured some form of authority from the President to raise troops in Missouri and to muster them into the sMissouri and to muster them into the service of the United States. At all events, he did raise a regiment and took command himself as Colonel. With this force he reported to Captain Lyon and placed himself and regiment under his orders. It was whispered that Lyon thus reinforced intended to break up Camp Jackson and capture the militia. I went down to the arsenal in the morning to see the troops start out [May 10]. I had known Lyon for two years at West Point and in the old army afterwards. Blair I knew very well by sight. I h
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
equently became colonel. I mustered one regiment afterwards, when my services for the State were about closed. Brigadier-General John Pope was stationed at Springfield, as United States mustering officer, all the time I was in the State service. He was a native of Illinois and well acquainted with most of the prominent men in the State. I was a carpetbagger and knew but few of them. While I was on duty at Springfield the senators, representatives in Congress, ex-governors and the State legislators were nearly all at the State capital. The only acquaintance I made among them was with the governor, whom I was serving, and, by chance, with Senator S. Aati. In reality I wanted to see him. I had known him slightly at West Point, where we served one year together, and in the Mexican war. I was in hopes that when he saw me he would offer me a position on his staff. I called on two successive days.at his office but failed to see him on either occasion, and returned to Springfield.
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
so. Having but little to do after the muster of the last of the regiments authorized by the State legislature, I asked and obtained of the governor leave of absence for a week to visit my parents in Covington, Kentucky, immediately opposite Cincinnati. General McClellan had been made a major-general and had his headquarters at Cincinnati. In reality I wanted to see him. I had known him slightly at West Point, where we served one year together, and in the Mexican war. I was in hopes that w week to visit my parents in Covington, Kentucky, immediately opposite Cincinnati. General McClellan had been made a major-general and had his headquarters at Cincinnati. In reality I wanted to see him. I had known him slightly at West Point, where we served one year together, and in the Mexican war. I was in hopes that when he saw me he would offer me a position on his staff. I called on two successive days.at his office but failed to see him on either occasion, and returned to Springfield.
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
e patriotism of the meeting. After the speaking was over volunteers were called for to form a company. The quota of Illinois had been fixed at six regiments; and it was supposed that one company would be as much as would be accepted from Galena.out. There was a clerk in the office of the Adjutant-General who supplied my deficiencies. The ease with which the State of Illinois settled its accounts with the government at the close of the war is evidence of the efficiency of Mr. [John S.] Looationed at Springfield, as United States mustering officer, all the time I was in the State service. He was a native of Illinois and well acquainted with most of the prominent men in the State. I was a carpetbagger and knew but few of them. While ul whether I would be equal to the position. But I had seen nearly every colonel who had been mustered in from the State of Illinois, and some from Indiana, and felt that if they could command a regiment properly, and with credit, I could also.
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