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Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 67
entirely new, and was wearing a sword of considerable value, very likely the sword which had been presented by the State of Virginia; at all events, it was an entirely different sword from the one that would ordinarily be worn in the field. In my .] Parker, secretary on my staff, for writing materials, and commenced writing out the following terms: Appomattox C. H., Va., April 9th, 1865 Gen. R. E. Lee, Comd'g C. S. A. Gen.: In accordance with the substance of my letter to you of the 8th inst., I propose to receive the surrender of the Army of N. Va. on the following terms, to wit: Rolls of all the officers and men to be made in duplicate. One copy to be given to an officer designated by me, the other to be retained by such officeright at Appomattox. Soon after Lee's departure I telegraphed to Washington as follows: Headquarters Appomattox C. H., Va., April 9th, 1865, 4.30 P. M. Hon. E. M. Stanton: Secretary of War, Washington. General Lee surrendered the Army of Nor
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 67
as for a different purpose from that of surrendering his army, and I answered him as follows: Headquarters Armies of the U. S., April 9, 1865 General R. E. Lee, Commanding C. S. A. Your note of yesterday is received. As I have no authority to ts you may designate. The officers to give their individual paroles not to take up arms against the Government of the United States until properly exchanged, and each company or regimental commander sign a like parole for the men of their commands. horses or baggage. This done, each officer and man will be allowed to return to their homes, not to be disturbed by United States authority so long as they observe their paroles and the laws in force where they may reside. Very respectfully, U.arry themselves and their families through the next winter without the aid of the horses they were then riding. The United States did not want them and I would, therefore, instruct the officers I left behind to receive the paroles of his troops to
Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 67
ured. I wrote the following note in reply and hastened on: April 9, 1865 General R. E. Lee, Commanding C. S. Armies. Your note of this date is but this moment (11.50 A. M.) received, in consequence of my having passed from the Richmond and Lynchburg road to the Farmville and Lynchburg road. I am at this writing about four miles west of Walker's Church and will push forward to the front for the purpose of meeting you. Notice sent to me on this road where you wish the interview to take plaLynchburg road. I am at this writing about four miles west of Walker's Church and will push forward to the front for the purpose of meeting you. Notice sent to me on this road where you wish the interview to take place will meet me. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General I was conducted at once to where Sheridan was located with his troops drawn up in line of battle facing the Confederate Army near by. They were very much excited, and expressed their view that this was all a ruse employed to enable the Confederates to get away. They said they believed that Johnston was marching up from North Carolina now, and Lee was moving to join him; and they would whip the rebels where they now were in five minutes if I
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 67
his own lines, and all went into bivouac for the night at Appomattox. Soon after Lee's departure I telegraphed to Washington as follows: Headquarters Appomattox C. H., Va., April 9th, 1865, 4.30 P. M. Hon. E. M. Stanton: Secretary of War, Washington. General Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia this afternoon on terms proposed by myself. The accompanying additional correspondence will show the conditions fully. U. S. Grant, Lieut.-General When news of the surrender first reaen commenced firing a salute of a hundred guns in honor of the victory. I at once sent word, however, to have it stopped. The Confederates were now our prisoners, and we did not want to exult over their downfall. I determined to return to Washington at once, with a view to putting a stop to the purchase of supplies, and what I now deemed other useless outlay of money. Before leaving, however, I thought I would like to see General Lee again; so next morning I rode out beyond our lines towa
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 67
anted. As for forage, we had ourselves depended almost entirely upon the country for that. Generals Gibbon, Griffin and Merritt were designated by me to carry into effect the paroling of Lee's troops before they should start for their homes-General Lee leaving Generals Longstreet, Gordon and Pendleton for them to confer with in order to facilitate this work. Lee and I then separated as cordially as we had met, he returning to his own lines, and all went into bivouac for the night at Appomattox. Soon after Lee's departure I telegraphed to Washington as follows: Headquarters Appomattox C. H., Va., April 9th, 1865, 4.30 P. M. Hon. E. M. Stanton: Secretary of War, Washington. General Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia this afternoon on terms proposed by myself. The accompanying additional correspondence will show the conditions fully. U. S. Grant, Lieut.-General When news of the surrender first reached our lines our men commenced firing a salute of a hundred gu
Farmville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 67
r that purpose. R. E. Lee, General Lieutenant-General U. S. Grant, Commanding U. S. Armies. When the officer reached me I was still suffering with the sick headache; but the instant I saw the contents of the note I was cured. I wrote the following note in reply and hastened on: April 9, 1865 General R. E. Lee, Commanding C. S. Armies. Your note of this date is but this moment (11.50 A. M.) received, in consequence of my having passed from the Richmond and Lynchburg road to the Farmville and Lynchburg road. I am at this writing about four miles west of Walker's Church and will push forward to the front for the purpose of meeting you. Notice sent to me on this road where you wish the interview to take place will meet me. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General I was conducted at once to where Sheridan was located with his troops drawn up in line of battle facing the Confederate Army near by. They were very much excited, and expressed their view that this was all a ruse employ
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 67
d to the front for the purpose of meeting you. Notice sent to me on this road where you wish the interview to take place will meet me. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General I was conducted at once to where Sheridan was located with his troops drawn up in line of battle facing the Confederate Army near by. They were very much excited, and expressed their view that this was all a ruse employed to enable the Confederates to get away. They said they believed that Johnston was marching up from North Carolina now, and Lee was moving to join him; and they would whip the rebels where they now were in five minutes if I would only let them go in. But I had no doubt about the good faith of Lee, and pretty soon was conducted to where he was. I found him at the house of a Mr. [Wilmer] McLean, at Appomattox Court House, with Colonel [Charles] Marshall, one of his staff officers, awaiting my arrival. The head of his column was occupying a hill, on a portion of which was an apple orchard, beyond a lit
John B. Gordon (search for this): chapter 67
nty-five thousand : and I authorized him to send his own commissary and quartermaster to Appomattox Station, two or three miles away, where he could have, out of the trains we had stopped, all the provisions wanted. As for forage, we had ourselves depended almost entirely upon the country for that. Generals Gibbon, Griffin and Merritt were designated by me to carry into effect the paroling of Lee's troops before they should start for their homes-General Lee leaving Generals Longstreet, Gordon and Pendleton for them to confer with in order to facilitate this work. Lee and I then separated as cordially as we had met, he returning to his own lines, and all went into bivouac for the night at Appomattox. Soon after Lee's departure I telegraphed to Washington as follows: Headquarters Appomattox C. H., Va., April 9th, 1865, 4.30 P. M. Hon. E. M. Stanton: Secretary of War, Washington. General Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia this afternoon on terms proposed by myse
Negotiations at Appomattox-interview with Lee at McLean's House-the terms of surrender-lee's surr in. But I had no doubt about the good faith of Lee, and pretty soon was conducted to where he was.t mass of those who were opposed to us. General Lee was dressed in a full uniform which was ention had run on in this style for some time, General Lee called my attention to the object of our me This continued for some little time, when General Lee again interrupted the course of the convers Then, after a little further conversation, General Lee remarked to me again that their army was orn a horse or mule take the animal to his home. Lee remarked again that this would have a happy effenerals present were severally presented to General Lee. The much talked of surrendering of Lee and a staff-officer carrying a white flag. Lee soon mounted his horse, seeing who it was, and is advice would be followed with alacrity. But Lee said, that he could not do that without consult[29 more...]
Charles Griffin (search for this): chapter 67
ched corn exclusively, and that he would have to ask me for rations and forage. I told him certainly, and asked for how many men he wanted rations. His answer was about twenty-five thousand : and I authorized him to send his own commissary and quartermaster to Appomattox Station, two or three miles away, where he could have, out of the trains we had stopped, all the provisions wanted. As for forage, we had ourselves depended almost entirely upon the country for that. Generals Gibbon, Griffin and Merritt were designated by me to carry into effect the paroling of Lee's troops before they should start for their homes-General Lee leaving Generals Longstreet, Gordon and Pendleton for them to confer with in order to facilitate this work. Lee and I then separated as cordially as we had met, he returning to his own lines, and all went into bivouac for the night at Appomattox. Soon after Lee's departure I telegraphed to Washington as follows: Headquarters Appomattox C. H., Va., A
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