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Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
in a hospital near Richmond, from wounds received in battle. She told us that when he had left for the front, in the midst of her terrible grief, her last words to him as she held his hand had been, My son, remember it is just as near heaven in Virginia as it is here in our home in Alabama. Years after the young man had been buried, I happened one Sunday to be attending divine service in Hamilton, Georgia, and in the course of his sermon the Rev. William Boothe, a godly Methodist minister, enfho quickly replied, I am so thankful that some kind friend will bear a message to my mother, who is a widow living down in Alabama. I am her only son and child. Please say to her from me these words: Remember that it is just as near heaven in Virginia as it is in our home in Alabama. There has never been a night on the tented field, or when entering into battle, when those words, my mother's words, and spoken as I left her, have not been with me. So speaking, the soldier's face was lighted
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
roach of the Northern army. Leaving a broken home circle, I returned to southern Alabama, where everything was moving on as before; the thump of the house-loom andn, remember it is just as near heaven in Virginia as it is here in our home in Alabama. Years after the young man had been buried, I happened one Sunday to be atten enforced his text by relating an incident. He told how a young man native of Alabama, wounded in battle, lay dying in a hospital hear Richmond. The minister, in vme kind friend will bear a message to my mother, who is a widow living down in Alabama. I am her only son and child. Please say to her from me these words: Remember that it is just as near heaven in Virginia as it is in our home in Alabama. There has never been a night on the tented field, or when entering into battle, when how fervent and plaintive was the prayer that ascended that April night in southern Alabama, from hundreds of dwellings peopled only by women, children, and negro sla
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
almost at our doors! I could not begin to describe our chagrin and terror. In life one is likely to remember always the exact circumstances under which the first shock of bad news was received. I know that the first tidings of the approach of the Yankee forces came to me as I was about to open the gate leading out on to the public road from Mr. G --‘s homestead. I was on my way to the school, when a man rode up, and halting an instant said, General Grierson and his army are marching from Mobile to Eufaula, and they will probably reach Eufaula to-night, or early to-morrow morning! As Mr. G — lived near the main highway, he did not expect to escape the invading army. Now, it seemed, we were to be awakened from the even tenor of our way, perhaps to know another meaning for hard times. Fear was depicted on every face, for who could tell but that the morrow's sun would cast its beams upon a heap of smoking ruins, and we be bereft of all the property we had. Teaching school was
Eufaula (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
rode up, and halting an instant said, General Grierson and his army are marching from Mobile to Eufaula, and they will probably reach Eufaula to-night, or early to-morrow morning! As Mr. G — livedEufaula to-night, or early to-morrow morning! As Mr. G — lived near the main highway, he did not expect to escape the invading army. Now, it seemed, we were to be awakened from the even tenor of our way, perhaps to know another meaning for hard times. Fear wa, composed of old men and young boys of the county, had that afternoon disbanded in the city of Eufaula, knowing that General Grierson would arrive that night or the next morning, and that resistance plantation lay, their expectation being that the Federal commander would march his column into Eufaula by a road on the other side of our settlement. When the horses' hoofs struck the bridge tha ask, Can it be that on that long April night in 1865, while the Federal army was marching into Eufaula by another road, we women and children, surrounded by negro slaves, were the sole occupants of
Hamilton, Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
e allowed. On one occasion I wept with a widow bereft of her only son and child, who had died in a hospital near Richmond, from wounds received in battle. She told us that when he had left for the front, in the midst of her terrible grief, her last words to him as she held his hand had been, My son, remember it is just as near heaven in Virginia as it is here in our home in Alabama. Years after the young man had been buried, I happened one Sunday to be attending divine service in Hamilton, Georgia, and in the course of his sermon the Rev. William Boothe, a godly Methodist minister, enforced his text by relating an incident. He told how a young man native of Alabama, wounded in battle, lay dying in a hospital hear Richmond. The minister, in visiting that hospital, speaking words of cheer and comfort to the sick, was touched by the sight of the young man, who, it was plain to see, was in immediate danger of death. Taking the hand of the dying boy, Mr. Boothe had said in a kindl
William Boothe (search for this): chapter 11
, remember it is just as near heaven in Virginia as it is here in our home in Alabama. Years after the young man had been buried, I happened one Sunday to be attending divine service in Hamilton, Georgia, and in the course of his sermon the Rev. William Boothe, a godly Methodist minister, enforced his text by relating an incident. He told how a young man native of Alabama, wounded in battle, lay dying in a hospital hear Richmond. The minister, in visiting that hospital, speaking words of cheer and comfort to the sick, was touched by the sight of the young man, who, it was plain to see, was in immediate danger of death. Taking the hand of the dying boy, Mr. Boothe had said in a kindly, fatherly way, My son, is there any message or word you would like me to send, or, perhaps, that I can bear myself to your people, wherever they may live? A glad smile lighted up the pale face of the soldier, who quickly replied, I am so thankful that some kind friend will bear a message to my mothe
t the first tidings of the approach of the Yankee forces came to me as I was about to open the gate leading out on to the public road from Mr. G --‘s homestead. I was on my way to the school, when a man rode up, and halting an instant said, General Grierson and his army are marching from Mobile to Eufaula, and they will probably reach Eufaula to-night, or early to-morrow morning! As Mr. G — lived near the main highway, he did not expect to escape the invading army. Now, it seemed, we were te entered the house by the back door, just in time to find all in great confusion, caused by a false alarm. The home guards, composed of old men and young boys of the county, had that afternoon disbanded in the city of Eufaula, knowing that General Grierson would arrive that night or the next morning, and that resistance would be useless. So they deemed discretion just then the better part of valor, and here they were, returning home by the road on which my employer's plantation lay, their exp
ble grief, her last words to him as she held his hand had been, My son, remember it is just as near heaven in Virginia as it is here in our home in Alabama. Years after the young man had been buried, I happened one Sunday to be attending divine service in Hamilton, Georgia, and in the course of his sermon the Rev. William Boothe, a godly Methodist minister, enforced his text by relating an incident. He told how a young man native of Alabama, wounded in battle, lay dying in a hospital hear Richmond. The minister, in visiting that hospital, speaking words of cheer and comfort to the sick, was touched by the sight of the young man, who, it was plain to see, was in immediate danger of death. Taking the hand of the dying boy, Mr. Boothe had said in a kindly, fatherly way, My son, is there any message or word you would like me to send, or, perhaps, that I can bear myself to your people, wherever they may live? A glad smile lighted up the pale face of the soldier, who quickly replied, I
om and dread of our feelings, one of the daughters turned to her cousin and said, Annie, what will you do if the Yankees come? Ooo-oo-o! with hands upraised, was the reply. Then cousin Annie turned to her cousin, after a long pause, and asked, Marie, what will you do if they come? Umph-mph-ph, with eyes dilated, was Marie's reply. Never a word was spoken save that question, followed by an inarticulate exclamation. Finally it seemed so ludicrous that we all broke forth into merry peals ofMarie's reply. Never a word was spoken save that question, followed by an inarticulate exclamation. Finally it seemed so ludicrous that we all broke forth into merry peals of laughter, which served as a safety-valve to our genuine depression. A married daughter of Mr. G--‘s was living in a small cottage near her father's, built so that he might have his daughter Under his care while her husband was away in our army. The married daughter did not feel disposed to leave her house exposed, but was too much alarmed to remain alone that night with her two small children. So she urged me to stay with her, as her mother would have the cousin and two older daughters.
humanity. In calling to mind the scenes of that night, I have often thought that had the Federal army really come, and the two little girls and I dashed into view in our long white robes, fleeing as if on the wings of the wind, we should have caused the moving host to halt. And oft as memory recalls those scenes I rub my eyes and ask, Can it be that on that long April night in 1865, while the Federal army was marching into Eufaula by another road, we women and children, surrounded by negro slaves, were the sole occupants of that exposed house? Yet so in truth it was. We felt no fear,of the slaves. The idea of any harm happening through them never for one instant entered our minds. But now, not for my right hand would I be situated as I was that April night of 1865. Now it would by no means be safe, for experience is showing us that in any section where the negro forms any very great part of the population, white men or women are in danger of murder, robbery, and violence.
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