hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Beaufort, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) 79 9 Browse Search
Florida (Florida, United States) 76 0 Browse Search
De Lord 76 0 Browse Search
Rufus Saxton 53 1 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 46 0 Browse Search
Charles T. Trowbridge 41 3 Browse Search
Jacksonville (Florida, United States) 40 2 Browse Search
Hunter 37 23 Browse Search
Fernandina, Fla. (Florida, United States) 37 1 Browse Search
United States (United States) 34 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment. Search the whole document.

Found 100 total hits in 42 results.

1 2 3 4 5
Beaufort, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
has begun to implant a feeling of sullen distrust in the very regiments whose early career solved the problem of the nation, created a new army, and made peaceful emancipation possible. T. W. Higginson, Colonel commanding 1st S. C. Vols. Beaufort, S. C., January 22, 1864. Headquarters First South Carolina Volunteers, Beaufort, S. C., Sunday, February 14, 1864. To the Editor of the New York Times: May I venture to call your attention to the great and cruel injustice which is impending ovBeaufort, S. C., Sunday, February 14, 1864. To the Editor of the New York Times: May I venture to call your attention to the great and cruel injustice which is impending over the brave men of this regiment? They have been in military service for over a year, having volunteered, every man, without a cent of bounty, on the written pledge of the War Department that they should receive the same pay and rations with white soldiers. This pledge is contained in the written instructions of Brigadier-General Saxton, Military Governor, dated August 25, 1862. Mr. Solicitor Whiting, having examined those instructions, admits to me that the faith of the Government was
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
ced. The few thousand dollars in question are nothing compared with the absolute wrong done and the discredit it has brought, both here and in Europe, upon the national name. T. W. Higginson, Late Col. 1st S. C. Vols. (now 3d U S. C. T.) Newport, R. I., December 8, 1864. Petition. To the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives of the United States in Congress assembled:-- The undersigned respectfully petitions for the repeal of so much of Section IV. of the Act of Congress makietween those colored soldiers who were free on or before April 19, 1861, and those who were not free until a later date; Or at least that there may be such legislation as to secure the fulfilment of pledges of full pay from date of enlistment, made by direct authority of the War Department to the colored soldiers of South Carolina, on the faith of which pledges they enlisted. Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Late Colonel 1st S. C. Vols. (now 33d U. S. C. Vols.) Newport, R. I., December 9, 1864.
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
ter winning. The One Hundred and Third New York entered the battery immediately after. These colored regiments are two of the five which were enlisted in South Carolina and Massachusetts, under the written pledge of the War Department that they should have the same pay and allowances as white soldiers. That pledge has been dith these men and received their services. When the War Department instructed Brigadier-General Saxton, August 25, 1862, to raise five regiments of negroes in South Carolina, it was known very well that the men so enlisted had only recently gained their freedom. But the instructions said: The persons so received into service, andslation as to secure the fulfilment of pledges of full pay from date of enlistment, made by direct authority of the War Department to the colored soldiers of South Carolina, on the faith of which pledges they enlisted. Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Late Colonel 1st S. C. Vols. (now 33d U. S. C. Vols.) Newport, R. I., December 9
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
Year's Day. Every one of those killed in this action from these two colored regiments — under a fire before which the veterans of twenty battles recoiled--died defrauded by the Government of nearly one half his petty pay. Mr. Fessenden, who defeated in the Senate the bill for the fulfilment of the contract with these soldiers, is now Secretary of the Treasury. Was the economy of saving six dollars per man worth to the Treasury the ignominy of the repudiation? Mr. Stevens, of Pennsylvania, on his triumphal return to his constituents, used to them this language: He had no doubt whatever as to the final result of the present contest between liberty and slavery. The only doubt he had was whether the nation had yet been satisfactorily chastised for their cruel oppression of a harmless and long-suffering race. Inasmuch as it was Mr. Stevens himself who induced the House of Representatives, most unexpectedly to all, to defeat the Senate bill for the fulfilment of the national
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 17
f colored soldiers, or at least so to modify it as to secure the fulfilment of actual contracts. Until this is done the nation is still disgraced. The few thousand dollars in question are nothing compared with the absolute wrong done and the discredit it has brought, both here and in Europe, upon the national name. T. W. Higginson, Late Col. 1st S. C. Vols. (now 3d U S. C. T.) Newport, R. I., December 8, 1864. Petition. To the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives of the United States in Congress assembled:-- The undersigned respectfully petitions for the repeal of so much of Section IV. of the Act of Congress making appropriations for the army and approved July 4, 1864, as makes a distinction, in respect of pay due, between those colored soldiers who were free on or before April 19, 1861, and those who were not free until a later date; Or at least that there may be such legislation as to secure the fulfilment of pledges of full pay from date of enlistment, made b
ted, for it still exists in writing, signed by the Secretary of War, and has never been disputed. It is therefore the plain duty of Congress to repeal the law which discriminates between different classes of colored soldiers, or at least so to modify it as to secure the fulfilment of actual contracts. Until this is done the nation is still disgraced. The few thousand dollars in question are nothing compared with the absolute wrong done and the discredit it has brought, both here and in Europe, upon the national name. T. W. Higginson, Late Col. 1st S. C. Vols. (now 3d U S. C. T.) Newport, R. I., December 8, 1864. Petition. To the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives of the United States in Congress assembled:-- The undersigned respectfully petitions for the repeal of so much of Section IV. of the Act of Congress making appropriations for the army and approved July 4, 1864, as makes a distinction, in respect of pay due, between those colored soldiers who were fr
James Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
s pauperism, that after it has had the lives of these men, it must turn round to filch six dollars of the monthly pay which the Secretary of War promised to their widows? It is even so, if the excuses of Mr. Fessenden and Mr. Doolittle are to be accepted by Congress and by the people. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, T. W. Higginson, Colonel commanding 1st S. C. Volunteers. New Victories and old wrongs. To the Editors of the Evening Post: On the 2d of July, at James Island, S. C., a battery was taken by three regiments, under the following circumstances: The regiments were the One Hundred and Third New York (white), the Thirty-Third United States (formerly First South Carolina Volunteers), and the Fifty-Fifth Massachusetts, the two last being colored. They marched at one A. M., by the flank, in the above order, hoping to surprise the battery. As — usual the rebels were prepared for them, and opened upon them as they were deep in one of those almost impas
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
Appendix D: the struggle for pay. The story of the attempt to cut down the pay of the colored troops is too long, too complicated, and too humiliating, to be here narrated. In the case of my regiment there stood on record the direct pledge of the War Department to General Saxton that their pay should be the same as that of whites. So clear was this that our kind paymaster, Major W. J. Wood, of New Jersey, took upon himself the responsibility of paying the price agreed upon, for five months, till he was compelled by express orders to reduce it from thirteen dollars per month to ten dollars, and from that to seven dollars, -the pay of quartermaster's men and day-laborers. At the same time the stoppages from the pay-rolls for the loss of all equipments and articles of clothing remained the same as for all other soldiers, so that it placed the men in the most painful and humiliating condition. Many of them had families to provide for, and between the actual distress, the sense of
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
ed by Major Trowbridge, commanding the Thirty-Third United States, and by the commander of the One Hundred and Third New York, so that the three regiments reached the fort in reversed order. The color-bearers of the Thirty-Third United States and of the Fifty-Fifth Massachusetts had a race to be first in, the latter winning. The One Hundred and Third New York entered the battery immediately after. These colored regiments are two of the five which were enlisted in South Carolina and Massachusetts, under the written pledge of the War Department that they should have the same pay and allowances as white soldiers. That pledge has been deliberately broken by the War Department, or by Congress, or by both, except as to the short period, since last New- Year's Day. Every one of those killed in this action from these two colored regiments — under a fire before which the veterans of twenty battles recoiled--died defrauded by the Government of nearly one half his petty pay. Mr. F
Thaddeus Stevens (search for this): chapter 17
he Treasury. Was the economy of saving six dollars per man worth to the Treasury the ignominy of the repudiation? Mr. Stevens, of Pennsylvania, on his triumphal return to his constituents, used to them this language: He had no doubt whatever aset been satisfactorily chastised for their cruel oppression of a harmless and long-suffering race. Inasmuch as it was Mr. Stevens himself who induced the House of Representatives, most unexpectedly to all, to defeat the Senate bill for the fulfilmeordance with the spirit, if not with the letter, of the final bill which was adopted by Congress under the lead of Mr. Thaddeus Stevens. The ground taken by Mr. Stevens apparently was that the country might honorably save a few dollars by dockingMr. Stevens apparently was that the country might honorably save a few dollars by docking the promised pay of those colored soldiers whom the war had made free. But the Government should have thought of this before it made the contract with these men and received their services. When the War Department instructed Brigadier-General Saxt
1 2 3 4 5