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Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
it is now raining. The Northern invaders who anticipate a pleasant sojourn during the winter and spring in this climate, have been very disagreeably disappointed in these expectations. A surgeon was arrested yesterday for saying there was a power behind the throne greater than the throne. Upon being asked by the mayor what power he alluded to, he answered the people. He was released. April 6 It seems that it was a mistake about the enemy's monitors approaching the forts in Charleston harbor; but the government has dispatches to the effect that important movements are going on, not very distant from Charleston, the precise nature of which is not yet permitted to transpire. Generals Johnston and Bragg write that Gen. Pillow has secured ten times as many conscripts, under their orders, as the bureau in Richmond would have done. Judge Campbell, as Assistant Secretary of War, having arrested Gen. P.'s operations, Generals J. and B. predict that our army in Tennessee will
Ford, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
recently dismissed one of his under clerks, named Ford, for reasons which I have not heard ; whereupon the latter notified the former of an intention to assault him whenever they should meet. About two P. M. they met in Bank Street; Ford asked Dixon if he was ready; and upon an affirmative response being given, they both drew their revolvers and commenced firing. Dixon missed Ford, and was wounded by his antagonist, but did not fall. He attempted to fire again, but the pistol missed fire. Ford's next shot missed D. and wounded a man in Main Street, some seventy paces beyond; but his next fire took effect in Dixon's breast, who fell and expired in a few moments. Many of our people think that because the terms of enlistment of so many in the Federal army will expire next month, we shall not have an active spring campaign. It may be so; but I doubt it. Blood must flow as freely as ever! April 25 We have bad news from the West. The enemy (cavalry, I suppose) have penetrated
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
here are ready for them. Gen. Wise assailed the enemy on Saturday, at Williamsburg, captured the town, and drove the Federals into their fortMa-gruder. The President was ill and nervous, on Saturday. His wife, who lost her parent at Montgomery, Ala., a month ago, and who repaired thither, is still absent. Congress still refuses to clothe the President with dictatorial powers. Senator Oldham, of Texas, made a furious assault on the Secretary of War, last Saturday. He says Senate, while those having only merchandise arrive in safety almost daily. Gen. D. Green intimates that Mr. Memminger, and Frazer & Co., Charleston, are personally interested in the profits of heavy importations. April 27 A dispatch from Montgomery, Ala., states that the enemy have penetrated as far as Enterprise, Miss., where we had a small body of troops, conscripts. If this be merely a raid, it is an extraordinary one, and I feel some anxiety to learn the conclusion of it. It is hard to
Bull Bay, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
April 15 There is a dispatch, unofficial, from the West, contradicting the news of the defeat of Van Dorn. On the Cumberland River, another dispatch says, we have met with new successes, capturing or destroying several more gun-boats. And Wheeler has certainly captured a railroad train in the rear of the enemy, containing a large sum of Federal money, and a number of officers. We have nothing from the South, except a letter from Gen. Whiting, in regard to some demonstration at Bull Bay, S. C. Major Griswold, Provost Marshal, is now himself on trial before a court-martial, for allowing 200 barrels of spirits to come into the city. He says he had an order from the Surgeon-General; but what right had he to give such orders? It is understood he will resign, irrespective of the decision of the court. Congress, yesterday (the House of Representatives), passed a series of resolutions, denying the authority of the government to declare martial law, such as existed in this
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 26
nock. April 1 It is said we have taken Washington, a village in North Carolina. And it is reptween official dignitaries here and those at Washington; and I have no doubt many of the Federal officers at Washington, for the sake of lucre, make no scruple to participate in the profits of this trated by some of the government officials, at Washington, for purposes of speculation. Col. Lay astores. This will frighten the people in Washington City! He also writes that, unless the railroa the effect that Gen. Hill is likely to take Washington and Newbern, N. C.; Gen. Longstreet, Suffolkrs, it is said Hooker is falling back toward Washington, but these are merely rumors. The Presidhe secession of Virginia. The government at Washington did not believe the separation would last twe nothing definite from Suffolk, or from Washington, N. C. But we have Northern accounts of the It is said there is some despondency in Washington. Our people will die in the last ditch r
Berwick Bay (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
ss has resolved to adjourn on the 20th April. The tax bill has not passed both Houses yet. Gen. Blanchard has been relieved of his command in Louisiana. He was another general from Massachusetts. April 4 It is the belief of some that the riot was a premeditated affair, stimulated from the North, and executed through the instrumentality of emissaries. Some of the women, and others, have been arrested. We have news of the capture of another of the enemy's gunboats, in Berwick Bay, Louisiana, with five guns. It is said to have been done by cavalry. A dispatch just received from Charleston states that the enemy's monitors were approaching the forts, seven in number, and that the attack was commencing. This isjoyful news to our people, so confident are they that Gen. Beauregard will beat them. April 5 Snow fell all night, and a depth of several inches covers the earth this morning. It will soon melt, however, as it is now raining. The Northern invaders who an
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
Virginia. The government at Washington did not believe the separation would last two years! Nor do they believe now, perhaps, that it will continue two years longer. April 18 We have nothing more from the Peninsula, Suffolk, N. C., or South Carolina; but it is rumored that the enemy's gun-boats (seven or eight) have passed down the Mississippi in spite of our batteries at Vicksburg, which sunk one of them. If this be true, it is bad news. We have lovely weather now, and vegetation s, and then adopted it. April 29 Gen. Beauregard is eager to have completed the Torpedo ram, building at Charleston, and wants a great gun for it. But the Secretary of the Navy wants all the iron for mailing his gun-boats. Mr. Miles, of South Carolina, says the ram will be worth two gun-boats. The President of the Manassas Gap Railroad says his company is bringing all its old iron to the city. Wherefore? The merchants of Mobile are protesting against the impressment by government ag
Grand Gulf (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
to the city but weakly defended. Hooker must have overwhelming numbers, else he would not venture to advance in the face of Lee's army! Can he believe the silly tale about our troops being sent from Virginia to the Carolinas? If so, he will repent his error. We hear of fighting in Northwestern Virginia and in Louisiana, but know not the result. The enemy have in possession all of Louisiana west of the Mississippi River. This is bad for us,sugar and salt will be scarcer still. At Grand Gulf our batteries have repulsed their gun-boats, but the battle is to be renewed. The railroad presidents have met in this city, and ascertained that to keep the tracks in order for military purposes, 49,500 tons of rails must be manufactured per annum, and that the Tredegar Works here, and the works at Atlanta, cannot produce more than 20,000 tons per annum, even if engaged exclusively in that work They say that neither individual nor incorporated companies will suffice. The government m
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
he Rappahannock. Beauregard ready to defend Charleston. he has rebuffed the enemy severely. Frence hear from South Carolinians, recently from Charleston (I do believe it), Charleston will not be taken. If the ground be taken, it will not be Charleston. If the forts fall, and our two rams be takone is on the qui vive for further news from Charleston. Success there will make Beauregard the mose not informed of a renewal of the attack on Charleston. It is said our shot penetrated the turret they have been exulting over the capture of Charleston, and gold declined heavily. This report wasral papers have heard of the failure to take Charleston, and the sinking of the Keokuk; and yet they of $100,000,000, all their hopes, so far as Charleston is concerned, have been frustrated in a few imates that Mr. Memminger, and Frazer & Co., Charleston, are personally interested in the profits of have completed the Torpedo ram, building at Charleston, and wants a great gun for it. But the Secre[14 more...]
Dixon, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
the former of an intention to assault him whenever they should meet. About two P. M. they met in Bank Street; Ford asked Dixon if he was ready; and upon an affirmative response being given, they both drew their revolvers and commenced firing. Dixon missed Ford, and was wounded by his antagonist, but did not fall. He attempted to fire again, but the pistol missed fire. Ford's next shot missed D. and wounded a man in Main Street, some seventy paces beyond; but his next fire took effect in Dixon's breast, who fell and expired in a few moments. Many of our people think that because the terms of enlistment of so many in the Federal army will expire next month, we shall not have an active spring campaign. It may be so; but I doubt it. Blood must flow as freely as ever! April 25 We have bad news from the West. The enemy (cavalry, I suppose) have penetrated Mississippi some 200 miles, down to the railroad between Vicksburg and Meridian. This is in the rear and east of Vicks
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