hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
R. E. Lee 809 13 Browse Search
United States (United States) 780 0 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 562 2 Browse Search
G. T. Beauregard 448 0 Browse Search
Grant 434 30 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 410 4 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 402 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 390 2 Browse Search
Custis Lee 390 6 Browse Search
J. H. Winder 352 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary. Search the whole document.

Found 928 total hits in 229 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
dges! Our naval commanders are writing that they cannot get seamen --and at Mobile half are on the sick list. Lee writes that his men are in good fighting conwo torpedoes, badly ignited, failed to injure either of them. Capt. Kay, of Mobile, in conjunction with several other parties, has a scheme for the destruction ofat twenty-two transports of Grant's troops have descended the Mississippi River-Mobile, no doubt, being their destination. It is now believed that only a portion zed; also sent circular letters to the generals at Wilmington, Charleston, and Mobile to impose restrictions on blockade-running steamers belonging to private partieoking with anxiety for further news from Charleston. Gen. Maury writes from Mobile that he has seized, in the hands of Steever (who is he?), receipts for 4000 balents, it is quite probable, now, that all the forts and cities on the seaboard (Mobile, Savannah, Wilmington, Richmond) must succumb to the mighty engines of the enem
Island (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
or the falling back of Meade-and the detachment never would have been made without. This intelligence has been in the possession of the government four days; and if Charleston should fall now for want of men or material, there will be great culpability somewhere. All the non-combatants have been requested to leave Charleston-and none are allowed to enter the city. We have just got information from Charleston of a furious assault. So far the casualties are not very great, nor the Island batteries materially injured; but Sumter, it is feared, is badly shattered, yet is in no great danger. Much apprehension for the result is felt and manifested here. Six or eight large columbiads have been lying idle at the Petersburg depot for a month, although the prayers of the people of Charleston for heavy guns have been incessant! Col. Preston, Chief of the Bureau of Conscription, sent in a long communication to-day, asking for enlarged powers and exclusive jurisdiction in the con
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
There will probably not be so many prisoners taken as usual, since the alleged cruel treatment of our men now taken at Gettysburg, and the sending of Gen. Morgan to the Ohio Penitentiary, and shaving his head, by order of Gen. Burnside. A dispatproach of the army of the enemy, menacing communications with the Potomac, necessitating a concentration of our army at Gettysburg. Hill became engaged with a superior force of the enemy on the 1st July, but Ewell, coming up by the Harrisburg road, participated in the engagement, and the enemy were driven through Gettysburg with heavy loss, including about 5000 prisoners and several pieces of artillery. The enemy retired to a high range of hills, south and east of the town. On the 2d as could be moved, and part Of the arms collected on the field, were ordered to Williamsport. His army remained at Gettysburg during the 4th, and began to retire at night, taking with it about 4000 prisoners, nearly 2000 having been previously p
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
nothing new from any of the armies, except that my old friend, Gen. Rains, sent to Mississippi, stopped and stampeded Grant's army, after Johnston retreated from Jackson, with his subterra batteries. It appears that hundreds of the enemy and their horses were killed and wounded by the shells planted by him beneath the surface of turns out that Gen. Taylor got only 500 prisoners at Donaldsonville, La., instead of 4000. A writer in the New York Tribune says the Northern troops burnt Jackson, Miss. Lincoln has marked for close confinement and hostages three of our men for three free negroes taken on Morris Island. The government here has, at lastple as we now behold. Our rich men are the first to grow weary of the contest. Yesterday a letter was received by the Secretary of War from a Mr. Reanes, Jackson, Mississippi, advising the government to lose no time in making the best terms possible with the United States authorities, else all would be lost. He says but a short
Georgetown (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
besides a large amount of military stores. Precisely at this time the enemy disappeared from Fredericksburg, seemingly designing to take a position to cover Washington. Gen. Stuart, in several engagements, took 400 more prisoners, etc. Meantime, Gen. Ewell, with Gen. Jenkins's cavalry, etc., penetrated Maryland, and Pennsylvania as far as Chambersburg. On the 24th, Lt--Gens. Longstreet and Hill marched to the Potomac, the former crossing at Williamsport and the latter at Shepherdstown, uniting at Hagerstown, Md., advancing into Pennsylvania, and encamping near Chambersburg on the 27th. Ewell's corps advanced as far as York and Carlisle, to keep the enemy out of the mountains, and to keep our communications open. Gen. Imboden destroyed all the important bridges of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad from Martinsburg to Cumberland, damaging the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. Preparations were made to march upon Harrisburg, when information was received of the approa
York, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
ion to cover Washington. Gen. Stuart, in several engagements, took 400 more prisoners, etc. Meantime, Gen. Ewell, with Gen. Jenkins's cavalry, etc., penetrated Maryland, and Pennsylvania as far as Chambersburg. On the 24th, Lt--Gens. Longstreet and Hill marched to the Potomac, the former crossing at Williamsport and the latter at Shepherdstown, uniting at Hagerstown, Md., advancing into Pennsylvania, and encamping near Chambersburg on the 27th. Ewell's corps advanced as far as York and Carlisle, to keep the enemy out of the mountains, and to keep our communications open. Gen. Imboden destroyed all the important bridges of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad from Martinsburg to Cumberland, damaging the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. Preparations were made to march upon Harrisburg, when information was received of the approach of the army of the enemy, menacing communications with the Potomac, necessitating a concentration of our army at Gettysburg. Hill became engage
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
one side, and the Commissary- General, Col. L. B. Northrop, on the other. It appears that one of the assistant commissaries exchanged sugar for flour and rice in Alabama with a merchant or speculator, and then, after the lapse of a month or so, impressed the sugar. The party got the Attorney-General's opinion in his behalf, which e is sent to are supposed to be disloyal. Gen. Pillow has applied to have Georgia in the jurisdiction of his Bureau of Conscription, and the Governors of Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee unite in the request; also Generals Johnston and Bragg. Gen. Pillow already has Mississippi, Tennessee, Alabama, etc.-a much larger jurisdiction thAlabama, etc.-a much larger jurisdiction than the bureau here. Col. Preston, of course, protests against all this, and I believe the Secretary sympathizes with him. Prof.. G. Richardson, of the Georgia Military Institute, sends some interesting statistics. That State has furnished the army 80,000, between the ages of eighteen and forty-five years. Still, the average n
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 30
r cord. Butter is selling at $3 per pound, etc. etc. Nevertheless, most men look for relief in the foreign complications the United States are falling into. England will not prohibit the selling of steamers to the Confederate States, and the United States say it shall not be done; and France has taken possession of Mexico, errstood by me, about an equipoise among the political generals. Has he been instructed on that point in reference to Gen. Price? Letters from Mr. Crenshaw, in England, and the correspondence forwarded by him, might seem to implicate Major Caleb Huse, Col. J. Gorgas's ordnance agent, in some very ugly operations. It appears tha leaving $200,000 commission for whom? And that he really seems to be throwing obstacles in the way of Mr. C., who is endeavoring to procure commissary stores in England. Mr. C. has purchased £40,000 worth of bacon, but Major Huse, he apprehends, is endeavoring to prevent its shipment. Can this be so? The Charleston Mercury
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
To-day, for the third time since the war began, I derived some money from our farm. It was another interposition of Providence. Once before, on the very days that money was indispensable, a Mr. Evans, a blockade-runner to the Eastern Shore of Vie would advance that amount in Treasury notes. I accepted the sum on his conditions. This is the work of a beneficent Providence, thus manifested on three different occasions,--and to doubt it would be to deserve damnation! August 8 There is all have cabbages and parsnips, and red peppers. No doubt the little garden, 25 by 50, will be worth $150 to me. Thank Providence, we still have health! But the scarcity-or rather high prices, for there is really no scarcity of anything but meatone steamer from us, recently, nine miles below the city, and blew up a ship which was aground. He says it is tempting Providence to suffer that (now) most important city in the Confederate States to remain a day liable to sudden capture, which woul
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
State is in a ferment of rage against the administration for appointing Marylanders and Virginians, if not Pennsylvanians, quartermasters, to collect the war tax within its limits, instead of native citizens. Mr. W. H. Locke, living on the James River, at the Cement and Lime Works, writes that more than a thousand deserters from Lee's army have crossed at that place within the last fortnight. This is awful; and they are mainly North Carolinians. August 4 The partial gloom continues in defending the capital-but then he knows nothing of military affairs, yet I think he will be appointed. Gen. Wise's batteries crippled and drove off the enemy's monitor and gun-boats day before yesterday. The monitor was towed down the James River in a disabled condition. To-day, for the third time since the war began, I derived some money from our farm. It was another interposition of Providence. Once before, on the very days that money was indispensable, a Mr. Evans, a blockade
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...