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Potomac River (United States) (search for this): chapter 30
e to continue longer where he was. Such of the wounded as could be moved, and part Of the arms collected on the field, were ordered to Williamsport. His army remained at Gettysburg during the 4th, and began to retire at night, taking with it about 4000 prisoners, nearly 2000 having been previously paroled. The enemy's wounded that fell into his hands were left behind. He reached Williamsport without molestation, losing but few wagons, etc., and arrived at Hagerstown 7th July. The Potomac was much swollen by recent rains, that had fallen incessantly ever since he had crossed it, and was unfordable. The enemy had not yet appeared, until the 12th, when, instead of attacking, Meade fortified his lines. On the 13th Gen. Lee crossed at Falling Waters, the river subsiding, by fords and a bridge, without loss, the enemy making no interruption. Only some stragglers, sleeping, fell into the hands of the enemy. August 13 No news. It turns out that Gen. Taylor got onl
Donaldsonville (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
cent rains, that had fallen incessantly ever since he had crossed it, and was unfordable. The enemy had not yet appeared, until the 12th, when, instead of attacking, Meade fortified his lines. On the 13th Gen. Lee crossed at Falling Waters, the river subsiding, by fords and a bridge, without loss, the enemy making no interruption. Only some stragglers, sleeping, fell into the hands of the enemy. August 13 No news. It turns out that Gen. Taylor got only 500 prisoners at Donaldsonville, La., instead of 4000. A writer in the New York Tribune says the Northern troops burnt Jackson, Miss. Lincoln has marked for close confinement and hostages three of our men for three free negroes taken on Morris Island. The government here has, at last, indicated blockade-goods (U. S.) which are to be seized; also sent circular letters to the generals at Wilmington, Charleston, and Mobile to impose restrictions on blockade-running steamers belonging to private parties. The go
Marshall, Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
going down from Washington and Annapolis to Fortress Monroe during the whole week, and that 5000 men embarked at Fortress Monroe, on Monday, for (as they said themselves) Charleston. Among these was a negro regiment of 1300. T. C. Reynolds, confidential agent of the government in the trans- Mississippi States, sends copy of a circular letter from Lieut.-Gen. Kirby Smith to the representative men of Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas, to meet him in convention, 15th August, at Marshall, Texas. Mr Reynolds says he and others will exert themselves to prevent the meeting from taking a dangerous political direction. Gen. Smith is popular, and opposed to the States named setting up for themselves, although he plainly says in the circular that they must now adopt self-sustaining measures, as they cannot look for aid from the East. Mr. Reynolds says something, not clearly understood by me, about an equipoise among the political generals. Has he been instructed on that point in r
Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
hester, and both were in position when Ewell left Culpepper C. H. on the 16th. Gen. Early stormed the enemy's works at Winchester on the 14th, and the whole army of Milroy was captured or dispersed. Gen. Rhodes, on the same day, took Martinsburg, Va., capturing 700 prisoners, 5 pieces artillery, and a large supply of stores. More than 4000 prisoners were taken at Winchester; 29 pieces artillery; 270 wagons and ambulances; 400 horses, besides a large amount of military stores. Preburg on the 27th. Ewell's corps advanced as far as York and Carlisle, to keep the enemy out of the mountains, and to keep our communications open. Gen. Imboden destroyed all the important bridges of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad from Martinsburg to Cumberland, damaging the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. Preparations were made to march upon Harrisburg, when information was received of the approach of the army of the enemy, menacing communications with the Potomac, necessitating a conce
Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
t and hostages three of our men for three free negroes taken on Morris Island. The government here has, at last, indicated blockade-goodsr-General. August 18 There is heavy firing, day and night, on Wagner's battery and Fort Sumter. The enemy use 15-inch guns; but Sumter nemy, he has constructed another which will render that part of Morris Island untenable. But he relied upon holding Sumter; and there is a vh face have been silenced by the land batteries of the enemy on Morris Island; and this account is two days old. What has taken place since, ard, the people are saying, no lodgment could have been made on Morris Island by the enemy, and Sumter and Charleston would have been saved ftucky, will not be executed. Nor will the officers taken on Morris Island, serving with the negroes, suffer death in accordance with the ews to transpire) that at the second assault on Battery Wagner, Morris Island, the enemy captured and held the rifle-pits. This, perhaps, in
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
ation! August 8 There is nothing new from any of the armies, except that my old friend, Gen. Rains, sent to Mississippi, stopped and stampeded Grant's army, after Johnston retreated from Jackson, with his subterra batteries. It appears that hundreds of the enemy and their horses were killed and wounded by the shells planted by him beneath the surface of the earth, and which ignited under the pressure of their weight. They knew not where to go to avoid them, and so they retreated to Vicksburg. This invention may become a terror to all invading. A letter received some days ago from a Mr. Bible, in Georgia, proposing to contribute one-quarter of his slaves as teamsters, cooks, etc. for the army, came back from the President, to-day, approved, with directions to quartermasters to employ in such capacities all that could be procured. Col. Myers, the Quartermaster-General, who is charged with saying Let them suffer, when the soldiers wanted blankets last winter, is to go ou
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 30
Confederate notes are now given for gold at the rate of $12 or $15 for $1. Flour is $40 per barrel; bacon, $1.75 per pound; coal, $25 per cart-load; and good wood, $30 per cord. Butter is selling at $3 per pound, etc. etc. Nevertheless, most men look for relief in the foreign complications the United States are falling into. England will not prohibit the selling of steamers to the Confederate States, and the United States say it shall not be done; and France has taken possession of Mexico, erecting it into an Empire, upon the throne of which will be seated some European ruler. We think recognition of our government is not far behind these events; when we shall have powerful navies to open the blockade. We are used to wounds and death; but can hardly bear starvation and nakedness. August 5 A letter from Hon. W. Porcher Miles to the Secretary of War, received the 15th July, urging the government to send some long-range Brooke guns for the salvation of Charleston, and sa
Shelbyville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
ere on hand at the time-but there were no Brooke guns, simply. Thus, while Charleston's fate hangs trembling in the balance, and the guns are idle here, twenty days are fruitlessly spent. Mr. Miles appears to be a friend of Beauregard. Every letter that general sends to the department is sure to put twenty clerks at work in the effort to pick flaws in his accuracy of statement. A report of the ordnance officers of Bragg's army shows that in the late retreat (without a battle) from Shelbyville to Chattanooga, the army lost some 6000 arms and between 200,000 and 300,000 cartridges! Our naval commanders are writing that they cannot get seamen --and at Mobile half are on the sick list. Lee writes that his men are in good fighting condition — if he only had enough of them. Of the three corps, one is near Fredericksburg (this side the river), one at Orange C. H., and one at Gordonsville. I doubt if there will be another battle for a month. Meantime the Treasury notes c
Carlisle, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
e railroad companies would have procured negroes enough for its removal. Well, the first of August has passed, and the grand scheme of the War Office at Washington of a general servile insurrection did not take place. On the contrary, a large army of slaves might be organized to fight for their masters. To-day, it must be confessed, I saw some of the booty (if, indeed, it was not fairly bought) of the recent invasion of the North. A number of boxes of fine stationery, brought from Carlisle, Chambersburg, etc., were opened at the War Department. There is a controversy between the Secretary of War, Assistant Secretary, and Attorney-General on one side, and the Commissary- General, Col. L. B. Northrop, on the other. It appears that one of the assistant commissaries exchanged sugar for flour and rice in Alabama with a merchant or speculator, and then, after the lapse of a month or so, impressed the sugar. The party got the Attorney-General's opinion in his behalf, which was
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
d in battle, 10,000 men could be transported in twenty-four hours to either Fredericksburg or Richmond. Gen. Bragg is hurt, because one of his captains has been gcondition — if he only had enough of them. Of the three corps, one is near Fredericksburg (this side the river), one at Orange C. H., and one at Gordonsville. I douom this side of the Potomac, it appears that the fine iron on the road from Fredericksburg to Aquia Creek was not removed! Mr. Seddon's subordinates must answer for d Pennsylvania. The enemy could not be attacked advantageously opposite Fredericksburg, and hence he determined to draw him out of his position by relieving the lthe 4th and 5th by Ewell's corps, A. P. Hill's still occupying our lines at Fredericksburg. When the enemy discovered the movement (on the: 5th), he sent an army t of military stores. Precisely at this time the enemy disappeared from Fredericksburg, seemingly designing to take a position to cover Washington. Gen. Stuar
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