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Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
litia, be disarmed, to supply his men. This indicates that Lee is to have an immense army, and that Richmond is to be defended. But the Central and Fredericksburg Railroads must be repaired immediately, and at any expense to the government, or else all will fail! August 11 After all the applications of the railroad companies when Gen. Lee was in Pennsylvania, and the enemy had withdrawn from this side of the Potomac, it appears that the fine iron on the road from Fredericksburg to Aquia Creek was not removed! Mr. Seddon's subordinates must answer for this. The iron was wanted more than anything else but men. The want of men cannot be alleged for not securing it, because the railroad companies would have procured negroes enough for its removal. Well, the first of August has passed, and the grand scheme of the War Office at Washington of a general servile insurrection did not take place. On the contrary, a large army of slaves might be organized to fight for their masters
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 30
prohibit the selling of steamers to the Confederate States, and the United States say it shall not United States say it shall not be done; and France has taken possession of Mexico, erecting it into an Empire, upon the throne of t here has, at last, indicated blockade-goods (U. S.) which are to be seized; also sent circular le assassinate the leading public men of the United States--the war Abolitionists, I suppose. The Prer that (now) most important city in the Confederate States to remain a day liable to sudden capture home defense against raids, etc. in the Confederate States, of not less than 250,000 men. Gen. d exclusively to the mails to and from the United States--under Gen. Winder's sole direction. Mque to operate against the commerce of the United States as privateers, or in the volunteer navy -- the furious and universal outcry in the Confederate States against the extortioners and speculatorsrnment ship is equivalent to some $2000, Confederate States currency. Almost every day passages are[3 more...]
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 30
a great victory, there will be great disappointment. There are some gun-boats in the James as high up as Aiken's Landing. Two torpedoes, badly ignited, failed to injure either of them. Capt. Kay, of Mobile, in conjunction with several other parties, has a scheme for the destruction of the enemy in the Mississippi Valley. What it is, I know not-but I know large sums of money are asked for. After all, it appears that twenty-two transports of Grant's troops have descended the Mississippi River-Mobile, no doubt, being their destination. It is now believed that only a portion of Grant's army has been ordered here; also that Rosecrans's army will operate with Meade; the object being to besiege Richmond. Well, we shall, in that event, have Johnston and Bragg-altogether 200,000 men around the city, which ought to suffice for its safety. A grand battle may take place this fall, in which half a million of men may be engaged. That ought to be followed by a decisive result.
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
rn again fully in our favor. Major Wm. Norris, Signal Corps, reports that many transports and troops have been going down from Washington and Annapolis to Fortress Monroe during the whole week, and that 5000 men embarked at Fortress Monroe, on Monday, for (as they said themselves) Charleston. Among these was a negro regiment oFortress Monroe, on Monday, for (as they said themselves) Charleston. Among these was a negro regiment of 1300. T. C. Reynolds, confidential agent of the government in the trans- Mississippi States, sends copy of a circular letter from Lieut.-Gen. Kirby Smith to the representative men of Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas, to meet him in convention, 15th August, at Marshall, Texas. Mr Reynolds says he and others will exert eamers at Sandusky, and then overpower the guards, etc. It is wild, but not impracticable. We hear nothing to-day from the enemy on the Rappahannock or at Fortress Monroe. Our army in Western Louisiana captured some forty Yankee cotton-planters, who had taken possession of the plantations after driving their owners away. T
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
r. Major Wm. Norris, Signal Corps, reports that many transports and troops have been going down from Washington and Annapolis to Fortress Monroe during the whole week, and that 5000 men embarked at Fortress Monroe, on Monday, for (as they said themselves) Charleston. Among these was a negro regiment of 1300. T. C. Reynolds, confidential agent of the government in the trans- Mississippi States, sends copy of a circular letter from Lieut.-Gen. Kirby Smith to the representative men of Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas, to meet him in convention, 15th August, at Marshall, Texas. Mr Reynolds says he and others will exert themselves to prevent the meeting from taking a dangerous political direction. Gen. Smith is popular, and opposed to the States named setting up for themselves, although he plainly says in the circular that they must now adopt self-sustaining measures, as they cannot look for aid from the East. Mr. Reynolds says something, not clearly understood by me, abo
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
ieved, that it fell subsequently. I fear that the port of Charleston is closed finally — if indeed, as I hope, the city will be still held by Beauregard. Letters from Wilmington, dated 21st instant, urgently ask the Secretary of War to have oni of the Great Blakely guns for the defense of that city-and protesting against both being sent to Charleston. From this, I infer that one or both have been ordered to Beauregard. Gen. Samuel Jones has had a small combat with the enemy in Western Virginia, achieving some success. His loss was about 200, that of the enemy much greater. This is a grain of victory to a pound of disaster. The owners of several fast blockade-running steamers, in anticipation of the closing of all the ports, are already applying for letters of marque to operate against the commerce of the United States as privateers, or in the volunteer navy --still with an eye to gain. Gen. Lee has returned to the Army of Northern Virginia-and we shall probably soon
Meade (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
ilable in Europe. The steamers go and come every week, in spite of the cruisers, and they bring munitions of war, equipments, provisions, iron, etc. etc. So long as this continues, the war can be maintained; and of late very few captures have been made by the enemy. There are rumors of some manoeuvres of Gen. Lee, which may indicate an approaching battle. August 19 A scout, from Washington, has reported to Major Norris, signal corps, that 10,000 New York troops have recently left Meade's army, their term of service having expired; and that 30,000 men have been sent from his army against Charleston. This accounts for the falling back of Meade-and the detachment never would have been made without. This intelligence has been in the possession of the government four days; and if Charleston should fall now for want of men or material, there will be great culpability somewhere. All the non-combatants have been requested to leave Charleston-and none are allowed to enter
Raleigh (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
ested to the government to prohibit the exchange of newspapers in the flag of truce boat; but I doubt if they will act upon it. It is a manifest injury to us. The exchange of prisoners is practically resumed; the Federal boat delivering yesterday 750 of our sick and wounded; and we returned 600 of their sick and wounded. August 3 The President issued a proclamation to-day, calling upon all absentees to return to the ranks without delay, etc. Hon. D. M. Barringer writes from Raleigh, N. C., that the State is in a ferment of rage against the administration for appointing Marylanders and Virginians, if not Pennsylvanians, quartermasters, to collect the war tax within its limits, instead of native citizens. Mr. W. H. Locke, living on the James River, at the Cement and Lime Works, writes that more than a thousand deserters from Lee's army have crossed at that place within the last fortnight. This is awful; and they are mainly North Carolinians. August 4 The partia
Romney (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
ent an army corps across the Rappahannock, but this did not arrest Longstreet and Ewell, who reached Culpepper C. H. on the 8th, where they found Gen. Stuart and his cavalry. On the 9th the enemy's cavalry and a strong force of infantry crossed the Rappahannock and attacked Gen. Stuart, but they were beaten back, after fighting all day, with heavy loss, including 400 prisoners, 3 pieces artillery, and several colors. Gens. Jenkins and Imboden had been sent in advance, the latter against Romney, to cover the former's movement against Winchester, and both were in position when Ewell left Culpepper C. H. on the 16th. Gen. Early stormed the enemy's works at Winchester on the 14th, and the whole army of Milroy was captured or dispersed. Gen. Rhodes, on the same day, took Martinsburg, Va., capturing 700 prisoners, 5 pieces artillery, and a large supply of stores. More than 4000 prisoners were taken at Winchester; 29 pieces artillery; 270 wagons and ambulances; 400 horses, be
Johnson's Island (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
service. There will be, and ought to be, some special cases of exemption, where men have lost everything in the war and have women and children depending on their salaries for subsistence; but if this order be extended to the ordnance and other bureaus, as it must be, or incur the odium of injustice, and the thousand and one A. A. G.'s, there will soon be a very important accession to the army. Major Joseph B----, who was lately confined with over 1000 of our officers, prisoners, on Johnson Island, Lake Erie, proposes a plan to the Secretary of War whereby he is certain the island can be taken, and the prisoners liberated and conveyed to Canada. He proposes that a dozen men shall seize one of the enemy's steamers at Sandusky, and then overpower the guards, etc. It is wild, but not impracticable. We hear nothing to-day from the enemy on the Rappahannock or at Fortress Monroe. Our army in Western Louisiana captured some forty Yankee cotton-planters, who had taken possession
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