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Drewry's Bluff (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
ht, and it may be a decisive battle. I met Mr. Foote, of Tennessee, to-day. He asked me if I did not think our affairs were in a desperate condition. I replied that I did not know that they were not, and that when one in my position did not know, they must be bad enough. November 29 The clerks were marched out into the muddy street this morning in a cold rain, and stood there for hours, while the officers were making up their minds when to start for the boat to convey them to Drewry's Bluff, whence they are to march to Chaffin's Farm, provided the officers don't change their minds. There are reports of a repulse of the enemy by Lee yesterday, and also of a victory by Bragg, but they are not traceable to authentic sources. At 3 o'clock P. M. it is cold, but has ceased to rain. The want of men is our greatest want, and I think it probable Congress will repeal the Substitute Law, and perhaps the Exemption Act. Something must be done to put more men in the ranks, or
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
d nothing, it being part of a present to him from a butcher. November 14 Some skirmishing between Chattanooga and Knoxville. From prisoners we learn that the enemy at both those places are on half rations, and that Grant intends to attack Brad Gen. Wheeler has captured several hundred of the enemy in East Tennessee, driving the rest into the fortifications of Knoxville. Gen. Longstreet, at last accounts, was near Knoxville with the infantry. We shall not be long kept in suspense --as Knoxville with the infantry. We shall not be long kept in suspense --as Longstreet will not delay his action; and Burnside may find himself in a predicament. A private soldier writes the Secretary to-day that his mother is in danger of starving — as she failed to get flour in Richmond, at $100 per barrel. He says ifeports from the West, confirming the success of Longstreet. It is said he has taken 2200 prisoners, and is probably at Knoxville. The President left the city this morning for Orange Court House, on a visit to Gen. Lee and the Army of Northern V
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
alized a large profit, but the commissary agent has impressed it, and will not pay him cost for it. All he can do is to get a small portion of it back for the consumption of his employees, provided he returns to Tennessee and fulfills his iron contract. November 8 At this late day the Secretary of War is informed by Col. Gorgas that, in consequence of the enemy's possessing the coal mines in Tennessee, he shall not be able to supply orders for heavy shot, etc., for the defense of Charleston harbor, if the fleet of monitors were to pass the forts. Why, this has been daily looked for any time during the last three months! And information from the Western army indicates that only about one shell in twenty, furnished by Col. Gorgas, will explode. This reminds me of the doubts expressed by Gen. Cobb of the fitness of Col. G. for his position. This is a bleak November day, after some days of pleasant autumnal sunshine. I still gather a few tomatoes from the little garden; a bus
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 33
otatoes, etc. etc.-leaving the farmers only enough for their own subsistence. This will insure subsistence for the army, and I hope it will be a death-blow to speculation, as government pays less than one-fourth the prices demanded in market. Let the government next sell to nonpro-ducers, and every man of fighting age will repair to the field, and perhaps the invader may be driven back. We have the speech of the French Emperor, which gives us no encouragement, but foreshadows war with Russia, and perhaps a general war in Europe. We have rain again. This may drive the armies in Virginia into winter quarters, as the roads will be impracticable for artillery. The next battle will be terrific; too many men on either side will be easily taken prisoners, as exchanges have ceased. Dr. Powell brought us a bushel of meal to-day, and some persimmons. November 26 The weather is clear and bright again; but, oh, how dark and somber the faces of the croakers! The follow
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
ates to send conscripts to the army. The Georgia Legislature have passed a resolution, unanimously, asking the Secretary of War to revoke the appointments of all impressing agents in that State, and appoint none but civilians and citizens. I hope the Secretary will act upon this hint. But will he? The papers contain the following: Arrived in Richmond.-Mrs. Todd, of Kentucky, the mother of Mrs. Lincoln, arrived in this city on the steamer Schultz, Thursday night, having come to City Point on a flag of truce boat. She goes South to visit her daughter, Mrs. Helm, wife of Surgeon-General Helm, who fell at Chickamauga. Mrs. Todd is about to take up her residence in the South, all her daughters being here, except the wife of Lincoln, who is in Washington, and Mrs. Kellogg, who is at present in Paris. To the poor.-C. Baumhard, 259 Main Street, between Seventh and Eighth, has received a large quantity of freshlyground corn-meal, which he will sell to poor families at the f
Alexandria (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
strife and domination, foreseen and foretold by me in the Southern Monitor, published in Philadelphia; no one regarded the warning. Now hundreds of thousands are weeping in sackcloth and ashes. over the untimely end of hundreds of thousands slain in battle! And thousands yet must fall, before the strife be ended. November 2 A refugee from Portsmouth reports the arrival of 6000 Federal troops at Newport News, and that Richmond is to be menaced again. Brig.-Gen. H. W. Allen, Alexandria, La., reports 8000 deserters and skulking conscripts in that vicinity, and a bad state of things generally. Gen. Lee has written three letters to the department, dated 30th and 31st October. 1st, complaining of the tardiness of the Bureau of Examination, and the want of efficient officers; 2d, complaining of the furloughs given Georgia officers as members of the legislature, causing a brigade to be commanded by a lieutenant-colonel, etc.; 3d, relating to an order from the Secretary to re
Meade (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
ual in expelling the Confederate Government and restoring that of the United States than all of Meade's army. And this, too, they allege, when there is abundance in the country. Many seem to place the river, guarding the pont de tete. There is no excuse, no palliation. He said it was likely Meade's entire army would cross. This had been sent by the Secretary to the President, who indorsed uroes. So indicates the Mercury. We have news to-day of the crossing of the Rapidan River by Meade's army. A battle, immediately, seems inevitable. November 17 A cold, dark day. No news. eade is ordered to fight. They know at Washington it is too late in the season, in the event of Meade's defeat, for Lee to menace that city, or to invade Pennsylvania. It is a desperate effort to clt of Lee's manoeuvres, and it is to be supposed he understands his business. He has no fear of Meade's advance in this direction with his communications cut behind him. Captain Warner has sold
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 33
contain the following: Arrived in Richmond.-Mrs. Todd, of Kentucky, the mother of Mrs. Lincoln, arrived in this city on the steamer Schultz, Thursday night, having come to City Point on a flag of truce boat. She goes South to visit her daughter, Mrs. Helm, wife of Surgeon-General Helm, who fell at Chickamauga. Mrs. Todd is about to take up her residence in the South, all her daughters being here, except the wife of Lincoln, who is in Washington, and Mrs. Kellogg, who is at present in Paris. To the poor.-C. Baumhard, 259 Main Street, between Seventh and Eighth, has received a large quantity of freshlyground corn-meal, which he will sell to poor families at the following rates: one bushel, $16; half bushel, $8; one peck, $4; half peck, $2. November 16 Governor Brown, Georgia, writes the Secretary that he is opposed to impressments, and that the government should pay the market price — whatever that is. And the Rhett politicians of South Carolina are opposed to raisi
Hanover County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
d] Braxton Bragg. Official-John Withers, A. A. G. All agree in the conviction that the enemy has been defeatedperhaps badly beaten. Hon. H. S. Foote, just arrived from the vicinity of the field, says Bragg has only some 20,000 or 30,000 men, while Grant has 90,000, and he infers that incalculable disaster will ensue. And Meade is steadily advancing. Gen. Pickett, at Petersburg, has been ordered to send some of his troops north of Richmond, for the defense of the railroad in Hanover County. Miss Stevenson, sister of Major-Gen. Stevenson, has written the President for employment in one of the departments. He referred it to Mr. Memminger, who indorsed on it, coldly, as usual, there were no vacancies, and a hundred applications. The President sent it to the Secretary of War. He will be more polite. Another letter to-day from Mr. Memminger, requesting that a company, commanded by a son of his friend, Trenholm, of Charleston, be stationed at Ashville, where his famil
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
n Chattanooga and Knoxville. From prisoners we learn that the enemy at both those places are on half rations, and that Grant intends to attack Bragg soon at Lookout Mountain. Either Grant or Bragg must retire, as the present relative positions cannot long be held. Mr. A. Moseley, formerly editor of the Whig, writes, in respoces. November 25 We have an unintelligible dispatch from Gen. Bragg, saying he had, yesterday, a prolonged contest with the enemy for the possession of Lookout Mountain, during which one of his divisions suffered severely, and that the manoeuvring of the hostile army was for position. This was the purport, and the language,een received: [battle at Lookout Mountain.](official dispatch.) mission ridge, Nov. 24th, 1868. To Gen. S. Cooper. We have had a prolonged struggle for Lookout Mountain today, and sustained considerable loss in one division. Elsewhere the enemy has only manoeuvred for position. [Signed] Braxton Bragg, General. The Lates
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