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December, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 34
XXXIII. December, 1863 Assembling of Congress. President's message. the markets. no hope for the Confederate currency. Averill's raid. letter from Gov. Vance. Christmas. persons having furnished substitutes still liable to military duty. December 1 This morning the ground is frozen hard. There was no battle yesterday, only heavy skirmishing. Both armies were drawn up in line of battle, and the front lines slept on their arms. Some froze to death. This morning the enemy opened with artillery-but no battle ensued that we are aware of. At the last accounts from Bragg he was still retiring, near Dalton. His army must be nearly broken up. Bragg, it is rumored to-day, has been relieved. December 2 No battle yet, though still hourly expected on the old field near the Rappahannock. And we have nothing definite from the West. The appointment of Beauregard to succeed Bragg is not officially announced; and the programme may be changed. December
December 22nd (search for this): chapter 34
t of last session of Congress is a failure, in a great measure, in Virginia. It is said only 30,000 bushels of wheat have been received! But the Governor of Alabama writes that over 5,000,000 pounds of bacon will be paid by that State. December 21 We have dispatches to-day from Western Virginia, giving hope of the capture of Averill and his raiders. Such is the scarcity of provisions, that rats and mice have mostly disappeared, and the cats can hardly be kept off the table. December 22 Averill has escaped, it is feared. But it is said one of his regiments and all his wagons will be lost. Gen. Longstreet writes (16th instant) that he must suspend active operations for the want of shoes and clothing. The Quartermaster-General says he sent him 3500 blankets a few days since. There are fifty-one quartermasters and assistant quartermasters stationed in this city! Pound cakes, size of a small Dutch oven, sell at $100. Turkeys, from $10 to $40. December 23
December 21st (search for this): chapter 34
cipals will be called for. Some have contributed money to prevent the passage of such a law, and others have spent money to get permission to leave the country. Messrs. Gilmer and Myers, lawyers, have their hands full. The Confederate States Tax act of last session of Congress is a failure, in a great measure, in Virginia. It is said only 30,000 bushels of wheat have been received! But the Governor of Alabama writes that over 5,000,000 pounds of bacon will be paid by that State. December 21 We have dispatches to-day from Western Virginia, giving hope of the capture of Averill and his raiders. Such is the scarcity of provisions, that rats and mice have mostly disappeared, and the cats can hardly be kept off the table. December 22 Averill has escaped, it is feared. But it is said one of his regiments and all his wagons will be lost. Gen. Longstreet writes (16th instant) that he must suspend active operations for the want of shoes and clothing. The Quartermas
December 20th (search for this): chapter 34
ers, and will have their connivance, if not the connivance of Federal functionaries in Washington, interested in the speculation. Lieut..Col. Ruffin prefers trading with the enemy at New Orleans. It is rumored that Mr. Seddon will resign, and be succeeded by Gov. Letcher; notwithstanding Hon. James Lyons asserted in public (and it appears in the Examiner to-day) that Gov. L. told Gen. J. R. Anderson last year, subsequent to the fall of Donelson, he was still in favor of the Union. December 20 We have nothing new yet from Averill's raiders; but it is said Gen. Lee has set a trap for them. From East Tennessee there is a report that a battle has taken place somewhere in that region, but with what result is not yet known. There is much consternation among the Jews and other speculators here, who have put in substitutes and made money. They fear that their substitutes will be made liable by legislative action, and then the principals will be called for. Some have contribu
December 19th (search for this): chapter 34
t is enlarged, all substitutes now in the army will have to serve for themselves, and their employers will also be liable. December 18 Yesterday evening the battalion of clerks was to leave for Western Virginia to meet the raiders. After keeping them in waiting till midnight, the order was countermanded. It is said now that Gen. Lee has sent three brigades after Averill and his 3000 men, and hopes are entertained that the enemy may be captured. It is bright and cold to-day. December 19 Bright and cold. A resolution passed Congress, calling on the President to report the number of men of conscript age removed from the Quartermaster's and Commissary's Departments, in compliance with the act of last session. The Commissary-General, in response, refers only to clerks-none of whom, however, it seems have been removed. Capt. Alexander, an officer under Gen. Winder, in charge ot Castle Thunder (prison), has been relieved and arrested for malfeasance, etc. Gen. C.
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