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-house, etc. Gen. J. E. Johnston has been ordered to take command of Bragg's army. I saw a communication from Lieut.-Col. Ruffin (Commissary Bureau), suggesting the trade of cotton to the enemy in New Orleans for supplies, meat, etc., a Mr. Pollard, of St. Louis, having proposed to barter meat for cotton, which Col. Ruffin seems to discourage. Gen. Halleck has proposed a plan of exchange of prisoners, so far as those we hold go. We have 15,000; they, 40,000. A letter from Mr. Underwood, of Rome, Ga., says our people fly from our own cavalry, as they devastate the country as much as the enemy. We have a cold rain to-day. The bill prohibiting the employment of substitutes has passed both Houses of Congress. When the Conscription act is enlarged, all substitutes now in the army will have to serve for themselves, and their employers will also be liable. December 18 Yesterday evening the battalion of clerks was to leave for Western Virginia to meet the raiders.
Sterling Price (search for this): chapter 34
for next month. Among the papers sent in by the President, to-day, was one from Gen. Whiting,who, from information received by him, believes there will be an attack on Wilmington before long, and asks reinforcements. One from Gen. Beauregard, intimating that he cannot spare any of his troops for the West, oi for North Carolina. The President notes on this, however, that the troops may be sent where they may seem to be actually needed. Also an application to permit one of Gen. Sterling Price's sons to'visit the Confederate States, which the President is not disposed to grant. The lower house of Congress yesterday passed a bill putting into the army all who have hitherto kept out of it by employing substitutes. I think the Senate will also pass it. There is great consternation among the speculators. December 25 No war news to-day. But a letter, an impassioned one, from Gov. Vance, complains of outrages perpetrated by detached bodies of Confederate States cavalr
t's message. the markets. no hope for the Confederate currency. Averill's raid. letter from Gov. Vance. Christmas. persons having furniecutive powers by that body. But it won't pass. December 17 Averill (Federal) made a raid a day or two since to Salem (Roanoke County,anded. It is said now that Gen. Lee has sent three brigades after Averill and his 3000 men, and hopes are entertained that the enemy may be favor of the Union. December 20 We have nothing new yet from Averill's raiders; but it is said Gen. Lee has set a trap for them. From atches to-day from Western Virginia, giving hope of the capture of Averill and his raiders. Such is the scarcity of provisions, that rats, and the cats can hardly be kept off the table. December 22 Averill has escaped, it is feared. But it is said one of his regiments anorth Carolina soldier, for satisfactory reasons. December 28 Averill has escaped, losing a few hundred men, and his wagons, etc. The Ch
Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 34
we are aware of. At the last accounts from Bragg he was still retiring, near Dalton. His army must be nearly broken up. Bragg, it is rumored to-day, has been relieved. December 2 No b. The appointment of Beauregard to succeed Bragg is not officially announced; and the programmeit is doubted whether Beauregard is to succeed Bragg. Lieut.-Gen. Hardee is in command, temporarily, and it may be permanently. Bragg was relieved at his own request. I know he requested the same Tennessee, estimates our loss in prisoners in Bragg's defeat at but little over 1000, and 30 guns.ly reproaches the soldiers of the left wing of Bragg's army with not performing their whole duty inster, incompetent, etc.-and cited I saw Gen. Bragg's dispatch to-day, dated 29th ult., asking tond next — if he can. Hardee is yet commanding Bragg's army. I saw to-day a project, in Mr. Ben. Johnston has been ordered to take command of Bragg's army. I saw a communication from Lieut.-
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 34
ber 2 No battle yet, though still hourly expected on the old field near the Rappahannock. And we have nothing definite from the West. The appointment of Beauregard to succeed Bragg is not officially announced; and the programme may be changed. December 3 Meade recrossed the Rapidan last night! This is a greater relilled and wounded being estimated at 2000, which caused Grant to recoil, and retire to Chickamauga, where he is intrenching. After all, it is doubted whether Beauregard is to succeed Bragg. Lieut.-Gen. Hardee is in command, temporarily, and it may be permanently. Bragg was relieved at his own request. I know he requested theone from Gen. Whiting,who, from information received by him, believes there will be an attack on Wilmington before long, and asks reinforcements. One from Gen. Beauregard, intimating that he cannot spare any of his troops for the West, oi for North Carolina. The President notes on this, however, that the troops may be sent wh
J. J. Pollard (search for this): chapter 34
virtual seizure of Executive powers by that body. But it won't pass. December 17 Averill (Federal) made a raid a day or two since to Salem (Roanoke County, Va.), cutting the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, destroying the depot, bridges, court-house, etc. Gen. J. E. Johnston has been ordered to take command of Bragg's army. I saw a communication from Lieut.-Col. Ruffin (Commissary Bureau), suggesting the trade of cotton to the enemy in New Orleans for supplies, meat, etc., a Mr. Pollard, of St. Louis, having proposed to barter meat for cotton, which Col. Ruffin seems to discourage. Gen. Halleck has proposed a plan of exchange of prisoners, so far as those we hold go. We have 15,000; they, 40,000. A letter from Mr. Underwood, of Rome, Ga., says our people fly from our own cavalry, as they devastate the country as much as the enemy. We have a cold rain to-day. The bill prohibiting the employment of substitutes has passed both Houses of Congress. When the Con
r bushel; Irish potatoes, $8 to $10 per bushel; sweet potatoes, $12 to $15, and scarce; turnips, $5 to $6 per bushel. These are the wholesale rates. Groceries.-Brown sugars firm at $3 to $3.25; clarified, $4.50; English crushed, $4.60 to $5; sorghum molasses, $13 to $14 per gallon; rice, 30 to 32 cents per pound; salt, 35 to 40 cents; black pepper, $8 to $10. liquors.-Whisky, $55 to $75 per gallon; apple brandy, $45 to $50; rum, proof, $55; gin, $60; French brandy, $80 to $125; old Hennessy, $180; Scotch whisky, $90; champagne (extra), $350 per dozen; claret (quarts), $90 to $100; gin, $150 per case; Alsop's ale (quarts), $110; pints, $60. December 12 There was a rumor that Chattanooga had been evacuated; but it turns out that the enemy are fortifying it, and mean to keep it, while operating in East Tennessee. It is said Gen. Grant is to bring 30,000 men to Virginia, and assume command of the Army of the Potomac, superseding Meade. He may be ordered to take Richmond n
Pappenheimer (search for this): chapter 34
nooga had been evacuated; but it turns out that the enemy are fortifying it, and mean to keep it, while operating in East Tennessee. It is said Gen. Grant is to bring 30,000 men to Virginia, and assume command of the Army of the Potomac, superseding Meade. He may be ordered to take Richmond next — if he can. Hardee is yet commanding Bragg's army. I saw to-day a project, in Mr. Benjamin's handwriting, for a Bureau of Export and Import. Mr. G. A. Myers got a passport to-day for a Mr. Pappenheimer, a rich Jew; it was allowed by the Assistant Secretary of War. And a Mr. Kerchner (another Jew, I suppose) got one on the recommendation of Col. J. Gorgas, Chief of Ordnance, to bring back stores in his saddle-bags. Orders to-day were given that no more supplies from the United States should be received by the Federal prisoners here. It seems that our men in their hands are not even allowed the visits of their friends. December 13 Rained last night-and this morning we have
G. A. Myers (search for this): chapter 34
report that a battle has taken place somewhere in that region, but with what result is not yet known. There is much consternation among the Jews and other speculators here, who have put in substitutes and made money. They fear that their substitutes will be made liable by legislative action, and then the principals will be called for. Some have contributed money to prevent the passage of such a law, and others have spent money to get permission to leave the country. Messrs. Gilmer and Myers, lawyers, have their hands full. The Confederate States Tax act of last session of Congress is a failure, in a great measure, in Virginia. It is said only 30,000 bushels of wheat have been received! But the Governor of Alabama writes that over 5,000,000 pounds of bacon will be paid by that State. December 21 We have dispatches to-day from Western Virginia, giving hope of the capture of Averill and his raiders. Such is the scarcity of provisions, that rats and mice have mostly
t arrived from the country. Gen. Winder reported to the Secretary, to-day, that there were no guards at the bridges, the militia refusing to act longer under his orders. December 30 A memorial from the army has been presented in both houses of Congress. The speech of Mr. Foote, relative to a Dictator, has produced some sensation in the city, and may produce more. A great many Jews and speculators are still endeavoring to get out of the country with their gains. To-day Mr. Davies paid me $350 more, the whole amount of copyright on the 5000 copies of the first volume of new Wild Western scenes, published by Malsby. He proposes to publish the second volume as soon as he can procure the necessary paper. December 31 Yesterday the Senate passed the following bill, it having previously passed the House: A bill to be entitled an act to put an end to the exemption from military service of those who have heretofore furnished substitutes. Whereas, in the pr
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