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Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ntinued examination of the court-martial cases, to the great vexation of a score of political applicants, whom I could hear impatiently pacing the floor of the hall and waiting-room. At one o'clock, however, the doors were thrown open, and the throng admitted and dismissed, as rapidly as possible. I was much amused and interested, later in the day, in a variety of characters who presented themselves. First was an elderly lady, plainly but comfortably dressed, whose son was a prisoner in Baltimore. Her story, spun out to some length, was briefly this: Her son had been serving in the Rebel army. He heard that his sister was lying dead at home, and his mother at the supposed point of death. He determined to see them, and succeeded in getting through our lines undiscovered. He found his mother better. Before he got ready to return, he became very ill himself. She said she hid him in the house until he recovered, and on his way back to his regiment he was captured. He was now anx
hat position the lady's husband held in the Rebel service. Oh, said she, he was a captain. A captain! rejoined Mr. Lincoln, indeed!--rather too big a fish to set free simply upon his taking the oath. If he was an officer, it is proof positive that he has been a zealous rebel; I cannot release him. Here the lady's friend reiterated the assertion of his acquaintance with Mrs. Lincoln. Instantly the President's hand was upon the bell-rope. The usher in attendance answered the summons. Cornelius, take this man's name to Mrs. Lincoln, and ask her what she knows of him. The boy presently returned, with the reply that the Madam (as she was called by the servants) knew nothing of him whatever. The man said it was very strange. Well, it is just as I suspected, said the President. The party made one more attempt to enlist his sympathy, but without effect. It is of no use, was the reply; I cannot release him; and the trio withdrew, the lady in high displeasure. Next came a Metho
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 14
e should henceforth have nothing to do with the Rebels. Mr. Lincoln sat quietly through the story, his face in half shadow.always opposed to his joining them. Your word, rejoined Mr. Lincoln dryly, what do I know about your word? He finally took , one of the gentlemen claimed to be an acquaintance of Mrs. Lincoln; this, however, received but little attention, and the . Oh, said she, he was a captain. A captain! rejoined Mr. Lincoln, indeed!--rather too big a fish to set free simply upon riend reiterated the assertion of his acquaintance with Mrs. Lincoln. Instantly the President's hand was upon the bell-ropeswered the summons. Cornelius, take this man's name to Mrs. Lincoln, and ask her what she knows of him. The boy presently ospital chaplains, and he greatly desired such a place. Mr. Lincoln replied rather curtly, that he could do nothing for him.carelessly tossed aside, never to be thought of again by Mr. Lincoln. Subsequently the sermon fell into my hands. The on