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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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ve. I was on the circuit with Lincoln probably one-fourth of the time. The remainder of my time was spent in Springfield looking after the business there, but I know that life on the circuit was a gay one. It was rich with incidents, and afforded the nomadic lawyers ample relaxation from all the irksome toil that fell to their lot. Lincoln loved it. I suppose it would be a fair estimate to state that he spent over half the year following Judges Treat and Davis around on the circuit. On Saturdays the court and attorneys, if within a reasonable distance, would usually start for their homes. Some went for a fresh supply of clothing, but the greater number went simply to spend a day of rest with their families. The only exception was Lincoln, who usually spent his Sundays with the loungers at the country tavern, and only went home at the end of the circuit or term of court. At first, David Davis, Ms.relates one of his colleagues on the circuit, we wondered at it, but soon learn
ation from all the irksome toil that fell to their lot. Lincoln loved it. I suppose it would be a fair estimate to state that he spent over half the year following Judges Treat and Davis around on the circuit. On Saturdays the court and attorneys, if within a reasonable distance, would usually start for their homes. Some went for a fresh supply of clothing, but the greater number went simply to spend a day of rest with their families. The only exception was Lincoln, who usually spent his Sundays with the loungers at the country tavern, and only went home at the end of the circuit or term of court. At first, David Davis, Ms.relates one of his colleagues on the circuit, we wondered at it, but soon learned to account for his strange disinclination to go home. Lincoln himself never had much to say about home, and we never felt free to comment on it. Most of us had pleasant, inviting homes, and as we struck out for them I'm sure each one of us down in our hearts had a mingled feel
a quality or characteristic in which Lincoln was strikingly deficient. He had endorsed the Mexican war, but strangely enough, had lost none of his prestige with the Whigs on that account. The following letter by Butterfield's daughter is not without interest: Chicago, Oct. 12th, 1888. Mr. Jesse W. Weisk. Dear Sir: My father was born in Keene, N. H., in 1790, entered Williams College, 1807, and removed to Chicago in 1835. After the re-accession of the Whigs to power he was on the 21st of June in 1849 appointed Commissioner of the Land Office by President Taylor. A competitor for the position at that time was. Abraham Lincoln, who was beaten, it was said, by the superior dispatch of Butterfield in reaching Washington by the Northern route but more correctly by the paramount influence of his friend Daniel Webster. He held the position of Land Commissioner until disabled by paralysis in 1 852. After lingering for three years in a disabled and enfeebled condition, he died at
actice and reputation in Chicago. He was shrewd, adroit, and gifted with a knowledge of what politicians would call good management — a quality or characteristic in which Lincoln was strikingly deficient. He had endorsed the Mexican war, but strangely enough, had lost none of his prestige with the Whigs on that account. The following letter by Butterfield's daughter is not without interest: Chicago, Oct. 12th, 1888. Mr. Jesse W. Weisk. Dear Sir: My father was born in Keene, N. H., in 1790, entered Williams College, 1807, and removed to Chicago in 1835. After the re-accession of the Whigs to power he was on the 21st of June in 1849 appointed Commissioner of the Land Office by President Taylor. A competitor for the position at that time was. Abraham Lincoln, who was beaten, it was said, by the superior dispatch of Butterfield in reaching Washington by the Northern route but more correctly by the paramount influence of his friend Daniel Webster. He held the position of Land
. He was shrewd, adroit, and gifted with a knowledge of what politicians would call good management — a quality or characteristic in which Lincoln was strikingly deficient. He had endorsed the Mexican war, but strangely enough, had lost none of his prestige with the Whigs on that account. The following letter by Butterfield's daughter is not without interest: Chicago, Oct. 12th, 1888. Mr. Jesse W. Weisk. Dear Sir: My father was born in Keene, N. H., in 1790, entered Williams College, 1807, and removed to Chicago in 1835. After the re-accession of the Whigs to power he was on the 21st of June in 1849 appointed Commissioner of the Land Office by President Taylor. A competitor for the position at that time was. Abraham Lincoln, who was beaten, it was said, by the superior dispatch of Butterfield in reaching Washington by the Northern route but more correctly by the paramount influence of his friend Daniel Webster. He held the position of Land Commissioner until disabled by
fted with a knowledge of what politicians would call good management — a quality or characteristic in which Lincoln was strikingly deficient. He had endorsed the Mexican war, but strangely enough, had lost none of his prestige with the Whigs on that account. The following letter by Butterfield's daughter is not without interest: Chicago, Oct. 12th, 1888. Mr. Jesse W. Weisk. Dear Sir: My father was born in Keene, N. H., in 1790, entered Williams College, 1807, and removed to Chicago in 1835. After the re-accession of the Whigs to power he was on the 21st of June in 1849 appointed Commissioner of the Land Office by President Taylor. A competitor for the position at that time was. Abraham Lincoln, who was beaten, it was said, by the superior dispatch of Butterfield in reaching Washington by the Northern route but more correctly by the paramount influence of his friend Daniel Webster. He held the position of Land Commissioner until disabled by paralysis in 1 852. After linge
lect his claim, and therefore would do it if we could. I am neither joking nor in a pet when I say we would thank him to transfer his business to some other, without any compensation for what we have done, provided he will see the court costs paid for which we are security. --Ms. letter to Joshua F. Speed, March 27, 1842. he made no distinction between one of a business nature or any other kind. If a happy thought of expression struck him he was by no means reluctant to use it. As early as 1839 he wrote to a gentleman about a matter of business, observing crustly that a d-d hawk-billed Yankee is here besetting me at every turn I take, saying that Robert Kenzie never received the $80 to which he was entitled. In July, 1851, he wrote a facetious message to one of his clients, saying: I have news from Ottawa that we win our case. As the Dutch justice said when he married folks, Now where ish my hundred tollars. The following unpublished letter in possession of C. F. Gunther, Esq.
March 27th, 1842 AD (search for this): chapter 11
out his claim. I have always said that Mr. Everett is a very clever fellow, and I am very sorry he cannot be obliged; but it does seem to me he ought to know we are interested to collect his claim, and therefore would do it if we could. I am neither joking nor in a pet when I say we would thank him to transfer his business to some other, without any compensation for what we have done, provided he will see the court costs paid for which we are security. --Ms. letter to Joshua F. Speed, March 27, 1842. he made no distinction between one of a business nature or any other kind. If a happy thought of expression struck him he was by no means reluctant to use it. As early as 1839 he wrote to a gentleman about a matter of business, observing crustly that a d-d hawk-billed Yankee is here besetting me at every turn I take, saying that Robert Kenzie never received the $80 to which he was entitled. In July, 1851, he wrote a facetious message to one of his clients, saying: I have news from Ot
llinois. settling down to practice law. life on the circuit. story-telling. habits as lawyer and methods of study. law-office of Lincoln and Herndon. recollections of Littlefleld. studying Euclid. taste for literature. Lincoln's first appearance in the Supreme Court of Illinois. professional honor and personal honesty. the juror in the divorce case. After the wedding of Lincoln and Miss Todd at the Edwards mansion we hear but little of them as a married couple till the spring of 1843, when the husband writes to his friend Speed, who had been joined to his black-eyed Fanny a little over a year, with regard to his life as a married man. Are you possessing houses and lands, he writes, and oxen and asses and men-servants and maid-servants, and begetting sons and daughters? We are not keeping house, but boarding at the Globe Tavern, which is very well kept now by a widow lady of the name of Beck. Our room (the same Dr. Wallace occupied there) and boarding only costs us four
t: Chicago, Oct. 12th, 1888. Mr. Jesse W. Weisk. Dear Sir: My father was born in Keene, N. H., in 1790, entered Williams College, 1807, and removed to Chicago in 1835. After the re-accession of the Whigs to power he was on the 21st of June in 1849 appointed Commissioner of the Land Office by President Taylor. A competitor for the position at that time was. Abraham Lincoln, who was beaten, it was said, by the superior dispatch of Butterfield in reaching Washington by the Northern route but rney, and took great pleasure in relating it. During this same journey occurred an incident for which Thomas H. Nelson, of Terre Haute, Indiana, who was appointed Minister to Chili by Lincoln, when he was President, is authority. In the spring of 1849, relates Nelson, Judge Abram Hammond, who was afterwards Governor of Indiana, and I arranged to go from Terre Haute to Indianapolis in the stage coach. An entire day was usually consumed in the journey. By daybreak the stage had arrived from the
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