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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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ve. I was on the circuit with Lincoln probably one-fourth of the time. The remainder of my time was spent in Springfield looking after the business there, but I know that life on the circuit was a gay one. It was rich with incidents, and afforded the nomadic lawyers ample relaxation from all the irksome toil that fell to their lot. Lincoln loved it. I suppose it would be a fair estimate to state that he spent over half the year following Judges Treat and Davis around on the circuit. On Saturdays the court and attorneys, if within a reasonable distance, would usually start for their homes. Some went for a fresh supply of clothing, but the greater number went simply to spend a day of rest with their families. The only exception was Lincoln, who usually spent his Sundays with the loungers at the country tavern, and only went home at the end of the circuit or term of court. At first, David Davis, Ms.relates one of his colleagues on the circuit, we wondered at it, but soon learn
November 9th, 1866 AD (search for this): chapter 11
e least difficulty. It was evident he had carried the jury with him in a most masterly argument, the force of which could not be broken by the reply of the opposing counsel. After the jury retired he became very anxious and uneasy. The jury were in another building, the windows of which opened on the street, and had been out for some two hours. In passing along the street, one of the jurors on whom we very much relied, relates Lincoln's associate in the case, Grant Goodrich, letter, Nov. 9, 1866, Ms. he being a very intelligent man and firm in his convictions, held up to him one finger. Mr. Lincoln became very much excited, fearing it indicated that eleven of the jury were against him. He knew if this man was for him he would never yield his opinion. He added, if he was like a juryman he had in Tazewell county, the defendant was safe. He was there employed, he said, to prosecute a suit for divorce. His client was a pretty, refined, and interesting little woman in court. The
December 6th, 1854 AD (search for this): chapter 11
led. In July, 1851, he wrote a facetious message to one of his clients, saying: I have news from Ottawa that we win our case. As the Dutch justice said when he married folks, Now where ish my hundred tollars. The following unpublished letter in possession of C. F. Gunther, Esq., Chicago, Ills., shows how he proposed to fill a vacancy in the office of Clerk of the United States Court. It reads like the letter of a politician in the midst of a canvass for office: Springfield, Ill., December 6, 1854. Hon. Justice McLean. Sir: I understand it is in contemplation to displace the Present Clerk and appoint a new one to the Circuit and District Courts of Illinois. I am very friendly to the present incumbent, and both for his own sake and that of his family, I wish him to be retained so long as it is possible for the Court to do so. In the contingency of his removal, however, I have recommended William Butler as his successor, and I do not wish what I write now to be taken as any
actice and reputation in Chicago. He was shrewd, adroit, and gifted with a knowledge of what politicians would call good management — a quality or characteristic in which Lincoln was strikingly deficient. He had endorsed the Mexican war, but strangely enough, had lost none of his prestige with the Whigs on that account. The following letter by Butterfield's daughter is not without interest: Chicago, Oct. 12th, 1888. Mr. Jesse W. Weisk. Dear Sir: My father was born in Keene, N. H., in 1790, entered Williams College, 1807, and removed to Chicago in 1835. After the re-accession of the Whigs to power he was on the 21st of June in 1849 appointed Commissioner of the Land Office by President Taylor. A competitor for the position at that time was. Abraham Lincoln, who was beaten, it was said, by the superior dispatch of Butterfield in reaching Washington by the Northern route but more correctly by the paramount influence of his friend Daniel Webster. He held the position of Land
ization crystallized both his logic and his wit for use in another day. Reverting again to Mr. Lincoln as a lawyer, it is proper to add that he detested the mechanical work of the office. He wrote few papers — less perhaps than any other man at the bar. Such work was usually left to me for the first few years we were together. Afterwards we made good use of students who came to learn the law in our office. A Chicago lawyer, W. C. Whitney, Ms. in a letter to me about Mr. Lincoln, in 1866, says: Lincoln once told me that he had taken you in as a partner, supposing you had system and would keep things in order, but that he found out you had no more system than he had, but that you were in reality a good lawyer, so that he was doubly disappointed. Lincoln knew no such thing as order or method in his law practice. He made no preparation in advance, but trusted to the hour for its inspiration and to Providence for his supplies. In the matter of letter-writing I wish you woul
n over Douglas — if in reality she ever seriously accepted the latter's attentions. Mr. Lincoln may not be as handsome a figure, she said one day in the office during her husband's absence, when the conversation turned on Douglas, but the people are perhaps not aware that his heart is as large as his arms are long. Mrs. Lincoln accompanied her husband to Washington and remained during one session of Congress. While there they boarded at the same house with Joshua R. Giddings, and when in 1856 the valiant old Abolitionist came to take part in the canvass in Illinois, he early sought out Lincoln, with whom he had been so favorably impressed several years before. On his way home from Congress Lincoln came by way of Niagara Falls and down Lake Erie to Toledo or Detroit. It happened that, some time after, I went to New York and also returned by way of Niagara Falls. In the office, a few days after my return, I was endeavoring to entertain my partner with an account of my trip, and
February 10th, 1866 AD (search for this): chapter 11
in a marked degree his want of literary knowledge, extended somewhat his research in that direction. He was naturally indisposed to undertake anything that savored of exertion, but his brief public career had exposed the limited area of his literary attainments. Along with his Euclid therefore he carried a well-worn copy of Shakespeare, in which he read no little in his leisure moments. In travelling on the circuit, relates one of his associates at the bar, Lawrence Weldon, letter, Feb. 10, 1866, Ms. he was in the habit of rising earlier than his brothers of the bar. On such occasions he was wont to sit by the fire, having uncovered the coals, and muse, and ponder, and soliloquize, inspired, no doubt, by that strange psychological influence which is so poetically described by Poe in The Raven. On one of these occasions, at the town of Lincoln, sitting in the position described, he quoted aloud and at length the poem called Immortality. When he had finished he was questioned a
a quality or characteristic in which Lincoln was strikingly deficient. He had endorsed the Mexican war, but strangely enough, had lost none of his prestige with the Whigs on that account. The following letter by Butterfield's daughter is not without interest: Chicago, Oct. 12th, 1888. Mr. Jesse W. Weisk. Dear Sir: My father was born in Keene, N. H., in 1790, entered Williams College, 1807, and removed to Chicago in 1835. After the re-accession of the Whigs to power he was on the 21st of June in 1849 appointed Commissioner of the Land Office by President Taylor. A competitor for the position at that time was. Abraham Lincoln, who was beaten, it was said, by the superior dispatch of Butterfield in reaching Washington by the Northern route but more correctly by the paramount influence of his friend Daniel Webster. He held the position of Land Commissioner until disabled by paralysis in 1 852. After lingering for three years in a disabled and enfeebled condition, he died at
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