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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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Blackstone (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
oln addressed his partner thus: Billy, this is the young man of whom I spoke to you. Whatever arrangement you make with him will be satisfactory to me. Then, turning to me, he said, I hope you will not become so enthusiastic in your studies of Blackstone and Kent as did two young men whom we had here. Do you see that spot over there? pointing to a large ink stain on the wall. Well, one of these young men got so enthusiastic in his pursuit of legal lore that he fired an inkstand at the other g man once wrote to Lincoln, enquiring for the best mode of obtaining a thorough knowledge of the law. The mode is very simple, he responded, though laborious and tedious. It is only to get books and read and study them carefully. Begin with Blackstone's Commentaries, and after reading carefully through, say twice, take up Chitty's Pleadings, Greenleaf's Evidence, and Story's Equity in succession. Work, work, work, is the main thing. Letter to J. M. Brockman, Sept. 25, 1859, Ms. Linco
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
as a lawyer of rather extensive practice and reputation in Chicago. He was shrewd, adroit, and gifted with a knowledge of whletter by Butterfield's daughter is not without interest: Chicago, Oct. 12th, 1888. Mr. Jesse W. Weisk. Dear Sir: My fath., in 1790, entered Williams College, 1807, and removed to Chicago in 1835. After the re-accession of the Whigs to power he a disabled and enfeebled condition, he died at his home in Chicago, October 23d, 1855, in his sixty-third year. Very resp rolled by. About this time Grant Goodrich, a lawyer in Chicago. proposed to take Lincoln into partnership with him. Goode tended to consumption, and, if he removed to a city like Chicago, he would have to sit down and study harder than ever. Thpublished letter in possession of C. F. Gunther, Esq., Chicago, Ills., shows how he proposed to fill a vacancy in the officese of Parker vs. Hoyt, tried in the United States Court in Chicago, Lincoln was one of the counsel for the defendant. The su
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
where in behalf of the Whig party and its measures, had offered him the office of either Governor or Secretary of Oregon, and with the view of considering this and other offers he returned to Washington. Lincoln used to relate of this last-named journey an amusing incident illustrating Kentucky hospitality. He set out from Ransdell's tavern in Springfield, early in the morning. The only other passenger in the stage for a good portion of the distance was a Kentuckian, on his way home from Missouri. The latter, painfully impressed no doubt with Lincoln's gravity and melancholy, undertook to relieve the general monotony of the ride by offering him a chew of tobacco. With a plain No, sir, thank you; I never chew, Lincoln declined, and a long period of silence followed. Later in the day the stranger, pulling from his pocket a leather-covered case, offered Lincoln a cigar, which he also politely declined on the ground that he never smoked. Finally, as they neared the station where hor
Detroit (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
heart is as large as his arms are long. Mrs. Lincoln accompanied her husband to Washington and remained during one session of Congress. While there they boarded at the same house with Joshua R. Giddings, and when in 1856 the valiant old Abolitionist came to take part in the canvass in Illinois, he early sought out Lincoln, with whom he had been so favorably impressed several years before. On his way home from Congress Lincoln came by way of Niagara Falls and down Lake Erie to Toledo or Detroit. It happened that, some time after, I went to New York and also returned by way of Niagara Falls. In the office, a few days after my return, I was endeavoring to entertain my partner with an account of my trip, and among other things described the Falls. In the attempt I indulged in a good deal of imagery. As I warmed up with the subject my descriptive powers expanded accordingly. The mad rush of water, the roar, the rapids, and the rainbow furnished me with an abundance of material f
Manchester (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
Chapter 10. Early married life. Boarding at the Globe tavern. a plucky little wife. Niagara Falls. the patent for lifting vessels over shoals. candidate for Commissioner of the land office. the appointment of Butterfield. the ofh whom he had been so favorably impressed several years before. On his way home from Congress Lincoln came by way of Niagara Falls and down Lake Erie to Toledo or Detroit. It happened that, some time after, I went to New York and also returned by way of Niagara Falls. In the office, a few days after my return, I was endeavoring to entertain my partner with an account of my trip, and among other things described the Falls. In the attempt I indulged in a good deal of imagery. As I warmed ue clear the way between cause and effect. If there was any secret in his power this surely was it. After seeing Niagara Falls he continued his journey homeward. At some point on the way, the vessel on which he had taken passage stranded on a
Beardstown (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
with the argument. He then said: This is the first case I have ever had in this court, and I have therefore examined it with great care. As the Court will perceive by looking at the abstract of the record, the only question in the case is one of authority. I have not been able to find any authority to sustain my side of the case, but I have found several cases directly in point on the other side. I will now give these authorities to the court, and then submit the case. A lawyer in Beardstown relates this: J. Henry Shaw, letter, June 13, 1866, Ms. Lincoln came into my office one day with the remark: I see you've been suing some of my clients, and I've come down to see about it. He had reference to a suit I had brought to enforce the specific performance of a contract. I explained the case to him, and showed my proofs. He seemed surprised that I should deal so frankly with him, and said he would be as frank with me; that my client was justly entitled to a decree, and he sh
o think of a first-class office, and a second-class one would not compensate me for being sneered at by others who want it for themselves. I believe that, so far as the Whigs in Congress are concerned, I could have the General Land Office almost by common consent; but then Sweet and Dav. Morrison and Browning and Cyrus Edwards all want it, and what is worse, while I think I could easily take it myself I fear I shall have trouble to get it for any other man in Illinois. The reason is that McGaughey, an Indiana ex-member of Congress, is here after it, and being personally known he will be hard to beat by any one who is not. But, as the sequel proved, there was no need to fear the Hoosier statesman, for although he had the endorsement of General Scott and others of equal influence, yet he was left far behind in the race, and along with him Lincoln, Morrison, Browning, and Edwards. A dark horse in the person of Justin Butterfield sprang into view, and with surprising facility capture
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 11
has no vices has d-d few virtues. Good-day. Lincoln enjoyed this reminiscence of the journey, andous tables was occupied, but failed to find Mr. Lincoln. As we were nearing the door to the officed an extensive and paying practice there, but Lincoln refused the offer, giving as a reason that heer was lost sight of for a time. This hat of Lincoln's — a silk plug — was an extraordinary receptpied the front offices on the same floor with Lincoln and Herndon, and one day Mr. Hay came in and that he thought little of law. Of Ellsworth, Lincoln said: That young man has a real genius for wayears following his retirement from Congress, Lincoln, realizing in a marked degree his want of lit H. Treat, recently deceased, thus describes Lincoln's first appearance in the Supreme Court of Iles a lofty metaphor by way of embellishment. Lincoln once warned me; Billy, don't shoot too high —me in, and with a verdict for the defendant. Lincoln always regarded this as one of the gratifying[90 more...
ich, had another lawyer been in Mr. Lincoln's place, would have been consumed by the costs of litigation for years, with the result probably the same in the end. A young man once wrote to Lincoln, enquiring for the best mode of obtaining a thorough knowledge of the law. The mode is very simple, he responded, though laborious and tedious. It is only to get books and read and study them carefully. Begin with Blackstone's Commentaries, and after reading carefully through, say twice, take up Chitty's Pleadings, Greenleaf's Evidence, and Story's Equity in succession. Work, work, work, is the main thing. Letter to J. M. Brockman, Sept. 25, 1859, Ms. Lincoln never believed in suing for a fee. If a client would not pay on request he never sought to enforce collection. I remember once a man who had been indicted for forgery or fraud employed us to defend him. The illness of the prosecuting attorney caused some delay in the case, and our client, becoming dissatisfied at our conduct
Wendell Phillips (search for this): chapter 11
le. One of Lincoln's striking characteristics was his simplicity, and nowhere was this trait more strikingly exhibited than in his willingness to receive instruction from anybody and everybody. One day he came into the office and addressing his partner, said: Billy, what's the meaning of antithesis? Mr. Herndon gave him the definition of the word, and I said: Mr. Lincoln, if you will allow me, I will give you an example. All right, John, go ahead, said Mr. Lincoln in his hearty manner. Phillips says, in his essay on Napoleon, A pretended patriot, he impoverished the country; a professed Catholic, he imprisoned the Pope, etc. Mr. Lincoln thanked me and seemed very much pleased. Returning from off the circuit once he said to Mr. Herndon: Billy, I heard a good story while I was up in the country. Judge D-was complimenting the landlord on the excellence of his beef. I am surprised, he said, that you have such good beef. You must have to kill a whole critter when you want any. Ye
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