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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ial posts by President Taylor. a journey to Washington and incidents. return to Illinois. settlin. Mrs. Lincoln accompanied her husband to Washington and remained during one session of Congress.tman. The model was sent or taken by him to Washington, where a patent was issued, but the inventiosuperior dispatch of Butterfield in reaching Washington by the Northern route but more correctly by were the signal for Lincoln's departure from Washington. He left with the comforting assurance thalinois, however, before he again set out for Washington. The administration of President Taylor feeidering this and other offers he returned to Washington. Lincoln used to relate of this last-named ncoln arrived in Indianapolis, on his way to Washington to be inaugurated President. I had many oppthe Presidency. Before leaving his home for Washington, Mr. Lincoln caused John P. Usher and myselfweeds and easy-flowing tears overcame him in Washington. It was difficult for him to detect an impo
Grand Rapids (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
raphically and, I must confess, truthfully told by a gentleman now in New York, who was for several years a student in our office. I beg to quote a few lines from him: My brother met Mr. Lincoln in Ottawa, Ill., John H. Littlefleld, Brooklyn Eagle, October 16, 1887. one day, and said to him: I have a brother whom I would very much like to have enter your office as a student. All right! was his reply; send him down and we will take a look at him. I was then studying law at Grand Rapids, Mich., and on hearing from my brother I immediately packed up and started for Springfield. I arrived there on Saturday night. On Sunday Mr. Lincoln was pointed out to me. I well remember this first sight of him. He was striding along, holding little Tad, then about six years old, by the hand, who could with the greatest difficulty keep up with his father. In the morning I applied at the office of Lincoln and Herndon for admission as a student. The office was on the second floor of a bri
Springfield (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
an amusing incident illustrating Kentucky hospitality. He set out from Ransdell's tavern in Springfield, early in the morning. The only other passenger in the stage for a good portion of the dista circuit with Lincoln probably one-fourth of the time. The remainder of my time was spent in Springfield looking after the business there, but I know that life on the circuit was a gay one. It was es Court. It reads like the letter of a politician in the midst of a canvass for office: Springfield, Ill., December 6, 1854. Hon. Justice McLean. Sir: I understand it is in contemplation to dist Grand Rapids, Mich., and on hearing from my brother I immediately packed up and started for Springfield. I arrived there on Saturday night. On Sunday Mr. Lincoln was pointed out to me. I well reme might look in the future. I venture the assertion that he was the only member of the bar in Springfield who would have taken such a conscientious view of the matter. One phase of Lincoln's char
Ottawa, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ustly that a d-d hawk-billed Yankee is here besetting me at every turn I take, saying that Robert Kenzie never received the $80 to which he was entitled. In July, 1851, he wrote a facetious message to one of his clients, saying: I have news from Ottawa that we win our case. As the Dutch justice said when he married folks, Now where ish my hundred tollars. The following unpublished letter in possession of C. F. Gunther, Esq., Chicago, Ills., shows how he proposed to fill a vacancy in the off and acted in the law office has been graphically and, I must confess, truthfully told by a gentleman now in New York, who was for several years a student in our office. I beg to quote a few lines from him: My brother met Mr. Lincoln in Ottawa, Ill., John H. Littlefleld, Brooklyn Eagle, October 16, 1887. one day, and said to him: I have a brother whom I would very much like to have enter your office as a student. All right! was his reply; send him down and we will take a look at him.
Menard (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
n like, the corners of his mouth; his frame quivered with suppressed excitement; and when the point — or nub of the story, as he called it — came, no one's laugh was heartier than his. These backwoods allegories are out of date now, and any lawyer, ambitious to gain prominence, would hardly dare thus to entertain a crowd, except at the risk of his reputation; but with Lincoln it gave him, in some mysterious way, a singularly firm hold on the people. Lincoln was particularly strong in Menard county, and while on the circuit there he met with William Engle and James Murray, two men who were noted also for their story-telling proclivities. I am not now asserting for the, country and the period what would at a later day be considered a very high standard of taste. Art had not such patrons as to-day, but the people loved the beautiful as nature furnished it, and the good as they found it, with as much devotion as the more refined classes now are joined to their idols. Newspapers we
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
aging business with him, for we find him in another letter apologizing for his failure to visit Kentucky, because, he says, I am so poor and make so little headway in the world that I drop back in a mtter to Joshua Speed, who had written him of a favorable reference to him by Mr. Crittenden, of Kentucky, Lincoln had asked Speed to see Crittenden (then Governor of Kentucky) and secure from the lKentucky) and secure from the latter a recommendation for Baker, who wanted a first-class foreign mission. Crittenden did not approve of Baker, but suggested that he would favor Lincoln, whom he regarded as a rising man. Speed sugWashington. Lincoln used to relate of this last-named journey an amusing incident illustrating Kentucky hospitality. He set out from Ransdell's tavern in Springfield, early in the morning. The onlyetizer besides. His tall and uncommunicative companion declined this last and best evidence of Kentucky hospitality on the same ground as the tobacco. When they separated that afternoon, the Kentuck
Chile (Chile) (search for this): chapter 11
armly by the hand. See here, stranger, he said, good-humoredly, you're a clever, but strange companion. I may never see you again, and I don't want to offend you, but I want to say this: my experience has taught me that a man who has no vices has d-d few virtues. Good-day. Lincoln enjoyed this reminiscence of the journey, and took great pleasure in relating it. During this same journey occurred an incident for which Thomas H. Nelson, of Terre Haute, Indiana, who was appointed Minister to Chili by Lincoln, when he was President, is authority. In the spring of 1849, relates Nelson, Judge Abram Hammond, who was afterwards Governor of Indiana, and I arranged to go from Terre Haute to Indianapolis in the stage coach. An entire day was usually consumed in the journey. By daybreak the stage had arrived from the West, and as we stepped in we discovered that the entire back seat was occupied by a long, lank individual, whose head seemed to protrude, from one end of the coach and his fee
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
session of C. F. Gunther, Esq., Chicago, Ills., shows how he proposed to fill a vacancy in the office of Clerk of the United States Court. It reads like the letter of a politician in the midst of a canvass for office: Springfield, Ill., December 6ow-lawyer in another town, apologizing for failure to answer sooner, he explains: First, I have been very busy in the United States Court; second, when I received the letter I put it in my old hat and buying a new one the next day the old one was se will recognize this as a poem written by Charles Mackay, an English writer who represented a London newspaper in the United States during the Rebellion as its war correspondent. It was set to music as a chant, and as such was frequently rendered is the master. His client was acquitted, and he had swept the field. In the case of Parker vs. Hoyt, tried in the United States Court in Chicago, Lincoln was one of the counsel for the defendant. The suit was on the merits of an infringement of
Tazewell (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
held up to him one finger. Mr. Lincoln became very much excited, fearing it indicated that eleven of the jury were against him. He knew if this man was for him he would never yield his opinion. He added, if he was like a juryman he had in Tazewell county, the defendant was safe. He was there employed, he said, to prosecute a suit for divorce. His client was a pretty, refined, and interesting little woman in court. The defendant, her husband, was a gross, morose, querulous, fault-finding, to sleep, and when you get ready to give a verdict for that little woman, then wake me and not until then; for before I will give a verdict against her I will lie here till I rot and the pismires carry me out through the key-hole. Now, observed Lincoln, if that juryman will stick like the man in Tazewell county we are safe. Strange to relate, the jury did come in, and with a verdict for the defendant. Lincoln always regarded this as one of the gratifying triumphs of his professional life.
Lake Erie (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ps not aware that his heart is as large as his arms are long. Mrs. Lincoln accompanied her husband to Washington and remained during one session of Congress. While there they boarded at the same house with Joshua R. Giddings, and when in 1856 the valiant old Abolitionist came to take part in the canvass in Illinois, he early sought out Lincoln, with whom he had been so favorably impressed several years before. On his way home from Congress Lincoln came by way of Niagara Falls and down Lake Erie to Toledo or Detroit. It happened that, some time after, I went to New York and also returned by way of Niagara Falls. In the office, a few days after my return, I was endeavoring to entertain my partner with an account of my trip, and among other things described the Falls. In the attempt I indulged in a good deal of imagery. As I warmed up with the subject my descriptive powers expanded accordingly. The mad rush of water, the roar, the rapids, and the rainbow furnished me with an a
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