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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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Beardstown (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
to include in this chapter, as a specimen of his oratory at this time, his eloquent reference to the Declaration of Independence found in a speech delivered at Beardstown, August 12, and not at Lewiston five days later, as many biographers have it. Aside from its concise reasoning, the sublime thought it suggests entitles it to re me as follows: The apostrophe to the Declaration of Independence to which you refer was written by myself from a vivid recollection of Mr. Lincoln's speech at Beardstown, August 12, 1858. On the day following the delivery of the speech, as Mr. Lincoln and I were proceeding by steamer from Beardstown to Havana, I said to him thaBeardstown to Havana, I said to him that I had been greatly impressed by his concluding remarks of the day previous, and that if he would write them out for me I felt confident their publication would be highly beneficial to our cause as well as honorable to his own fame. He replied that he had but a faint recollection of any portion of the speech; that, like all his
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 14
had never extended beyond the limits of the Illinois prairies. In Washington I saw and dined with Trumbull, who went over the situation withhich are now being discussed. Letter, December 27, 1857, Ms. In Washington I saw also Seward, Wilson, and others of equal prominence. Doud tell him I have crossed the river and burned my boat. Leaving Washington, my next point was New York, where I met the editor of the Anti-Se taken up by the Republicans. Senator Seward, when I met him in Washington, assured me there was no danger of it, insisting that the Republiand am well — very well indeed. I wrote you a, hasty letter from Washington some days ago, since which time I have been in Philadelphia, Balt it to the world unerased. Meanwhile Douglas had returned from Washington to his home in Chicago. Here he rested for a few days until his ame young lady. In 1846 both represented Illinois in Congress at Washington, the one in the upper and the other in the lower House. In 1858
Alton (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
e uses and purposes for which it was given. Sincerely yours, A. Campbell. The places and dates were, Ottawa, August 21; Freeport, August 27; Jonesboro, September 15; Charleston, September 18, Galesburg, October 7; Quincy, October 13; and Alton, October 15. I agree to your suggestion, wrote Douglas, that we shall alternately open and close the discussion. I will speak at Ottawa one hour, you can reply, occupying an hour and a half, and I will then follow for half an hour. At Freeport rence. He advocated with all his power the doctrine of Popular Sovereignty, a proposition, as quaintly put by Lincoln, which meant that, if one man chooses to enslave another, no third man has a right to object. At the last joint discussion in Alton, Lincoln, after reflecting on the patriotism of any man who was so indifferent to the wrong of slavery that he cared not whether it was voted up or down, closed his speech with this stirring summary: That [slavery] is the real issue. That is the
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 14
feat. a specimen of his oratory. I shall be forced to omit much that happened during the interval between the election of Buchanan and the campaign of 1858, for the reason that it would not only swell this work to undue proportions, but be a mere repetition of what has been better told by other writers. It is proper to note in passing, however, that Mr. Lincoln's reputation as a political speaker was no longer bounded by the border lines of Illinois. It had passed beyond the Wabash, the Ohio, and the Mississippi rivers, and while his pronounced stand on the slavery question had increased the circle of his admirers in the North it provoked a proportionate amount of execration in the South. He could not help the feeling that he was now the leading Republican in his State, and he was therefore more or less jealous of his prerogative. Formidable in debate, plain in speech, without pretence of literary acquirements, he was none the less self-reliant. He already envied the ascendanc
Lewiston, Me. (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
to later events in Mr. Lincoln's life it is proper to include in this chapter, as a specimen of his oratory at this time, his eloquent reference to the Declaration of Independence found in a speech delivered at Beardstown, August 12, and not at Lewiston five days later, as many biographers have it. Aside from its concise reasoning, the sublime thought it suggests entitles it to rank beside that great masterpiece, his Gettysburg address. After alluding to the suppression by the Fathers of the were sitting. Having secured his assent to the publication I forwarded it to our paper, but inasmuch as my report of the Beardstown meeting had been already mailed I incorporated the remarks on the Declaration of Independence in my letter from Lewiston two or three days subsequently. I do not remember ever having related these facts before, although they have often recurred to me as I have seen the peroration resuscitated again and again, and published (with good effect, I trust) in the news
Patrick Henry (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
d with his speech the exercise of his vocal organs altered somewhat the tone of his voice. It lost in a measure its former acute and shrilling pitch, and mellowed into a more harmonious and pleasant sound. His form expanded, and, notwithstanding the sunken breast, he rose up a splendid and imposing figure. In his defence of the Declaration of Independence--his greatest inspiration — he was tremendous in the directness of his utterances; he rose to impassioned eloquence, unsurpassed by Patrick Henry, Mirabeau, or Vergniaud, as his soul was inspired with the thought of human right and Divine justice. Horace White, who was present and reported the speech for his paper, the Chicago Tribune. Letter, June 9, 1865, Ms. His little gray eyes flashed in a face aglow with the fire of his profound thoughts; and his uneasy movements and diffident manner sunk themselves beneath the wave of righteous indignation that came sweeping over him. Such was Lincoln the orator. We can somewhat app
Freeport (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
and purposes for which it was given. Sincerely yours, A. Campbell. The places and dates were, Ottawa, August 21; Freeport, August 27; Jonesboro, September 15; Charleston, September 18, Galesburg, October 7; Quincy, October 13; and Alton, Octwill speak at Ottawa one hour, you can reply, occupying an hour and a half, and I will then follow for half an hour. At Freeport you shall open the discussion and speak one hour, I will follow for an hour and a half, and you can then reply for half tions which Douglas propounded to Lincoln at their first meeting at Ottawa, nor the historic four which Lincoln asked at Freeport. It only remains to say that in answering Lincoln at Freeport, Douglas accomplished his own political downfall. He waFreeport, Douglas accomplished his own political downfall. He was swept entirely away from his former foundation, and even the glory of a subsequent election to the Senate never restored him to it. During the canvass Mr. Lincoln, in addition to the seven meetings with Douglas, filled thirty-one appointments m
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
rposes for which it was given. Sincerely yours, A. Campbell. The places and dates were, Ottawa, August 21; Freeport, August 27; Jonesboro, September 15; Charleston, September 18, Galesburg, October 7; Quincy, October 13; and Alton, October 15. I agree to your suggestion, wrote Douglas, that we shall alternately open and cs sleep. The train came and was filled instantly. I got a seat near the door for Lincoln and myself. He was worn out, and had to meet Douglas the next day at Charleston. An empty car, called a saloon car, was hitched on to the rear of the train and locked up. I asked the conductor, who knew Lincoln and myself well,--we were bo that the Democratic party could present for President; but they will not present him. The old leaders wouldn't endorse it. As he is doomed to be slaughtered at Charleston it is good policy to fatten him meantime. He will cut up the better at killing time. An inquiry for his preference as to Presidential timber elicited this re
Ottawa, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
applied to the uses and purposes for which it was given. Sincerely yours, A. Campbell. The places and dates were, Ottawa, August 21; Freeport, August 27; Jonesboro, September 15; Charleston, September 18, Galesburg, October 7; Quincy, Octobe 15. I agree to your suggestion, wrote Douglas, that we shall alternately open and close the discussion. I will speak at Ottawa one hour, you can reply, occupying an hour and a half, and I will then follow for half an hour. At Freeport you shall opossed swords here yesterday. The fire flew some, and I am glad to know I am yet alive. --Lincoln to J. O. Cunningham, Ottawa, Ill., August 22, 1858, Ms. It is unnecessary and not in keeping with the purpose of this work to reproduce here the spe unnecessary, I presume, to insert here the seven questions which Douglas propounded to Lincoln at their first meeting at Ottawa, nor the historic four which Lincoln asked at Freeport. It only remains to say that in answering Lincoln at Freeport, D
Springfield (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
sed, with great unanimity, at their convention in Springfield on the 16th of June, the characteristic resolutioell-defined. Numbers of his friends distant from Springfield, on reading his speech, wrote him censorious letttended as an answer to the one made by Lincoln in Springfield. Lincoln was present at this reception, but tookhicago, Douglas passed on down to Bloomington and Springfield, where he spoke on the 16th and 17th of July respch Congressional district, outside of Chicago and Springfield, for joint meetings. Among the items of prepar is the following letter, which explains itself: Springfield, June 28, 1858. A. Campbell, Esq. My Dear Sir:s position was announced in his opening speech at Springfield: A house divided against itself cannot stand. Iver the State, between meetings, he would stop at Springfield sometimes, to consult with his friends or to posting him not to give up the battle, he responded: Springfield, November 19, 1858. Mr. Henry Asbury, My Dear
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