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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
y met New England, Empire, Keystone, and Jersey, hewing their way right and left. The Sunny South too, in more colors than one, also lent a hand. On the spot, their part of the history was jotted down in black and white. The job was a great national one; and let none be barred who bore an honorable part in it. And while those who have cleared the great river may well be proud, even that is not all. It is hard to say that anything has been more bravely and well done than at Antietam, Murfreesboro, Gettysburg, and on many fields of lesser note. Nor must Uncle Sam's web-feet be forgotten. At all the watery margins they have been present. Not only on the deep sea, the broad bay, and the rapid river, but also up the narrow, muddy bayou, and wherever the ground was a little damp, they have been, and made their tracks, thanks to all. For the great republic — for the principle it lives by and keeps alive — for man's vast future — thanks to all. Peace does not appear so distant as<
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
eeping at bay a throng of callers, but, noticing me enter, arose and greeted me with his old-time cordiality. After the room had been partially cleared of visitors Secretary Seward came in and called up a case which related to the territory of New Mexico. Oh, I see, said Lincoln; they have neither Governor nor Government. Well, you see Jim Lane; the secretary is his man, and he must hunt him up. Seward then left, under the impression, as I then thought, that Lincoln wanted to get rid of him athat time. He carried not only Indiana, but all the New England States, New York, Pennsylvania, all the Western States, West Virginia, Tennessee, Louisiana, Arkansas, and the newly admitted State of Nevada. McClellan carried but three states: New Jersey, Delaware, and Kentucky. The result, as Grant so aptly expressed it in his telegram of congratulation, was a victory worth more to the country than a battle won. A second time Lincoln stood in front of the great Capitol to take the oath of of
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
p), he said, and clear them out of this part of the State so that they cannot threaten us here (Washington) and get into Maryland. We must keep up a good and thorough blockade of their ports. We must march an army into east Tennessee and liberate tgood horse awaited him at the rear of the theatre, on which he intended to ride into friendly shelter among the hills of Maryland. He made his way to the President's box — a double one in the second tier, at the left of the stage. The separating pae assassination Booth escaped unmolested from the theatre, mounted his horse, and rode away, accompanied by Harold, into Maryland. Cavalrymen scoured the country, and eleven days after the shooting discovered them in a barn on Garrett's farm, near Ps during an epidemic that he was pardoned and returned to this country. He died only about two years ago at his home in Maryland, near Washington. Atzerodt was sent to the Dry Tortugas also, and died there years ago. John Surratt fled to Italy, and
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
avid C. Harold, Lewis Payne, Edward Spangler, Michael O'Loughlin, J. W. Atzerodt, Samuel Arnold, and Dr. Samuel Mudd, who set Booth's leg, which was dislocated by the fall from the stage-box, were among the number captured and tried. After the assassination Booth escaped unmolested from the theatre, mounted his horse, and rode away, accompanied by Harold, into Maryland. Cavalrymen scoured the country, and eleven days after the shooting discovered them in a barn on Garrett's farm, near Port Royal on the Rappahannock. The soldiers surrounded the barn and demanded a surrender. After the second demand Harold surrendered, under a shower of curses from Booth, but Booth refused, declaring that he would never be taken alive. The captain of the squad then fired the barn. A correspondent thus describes the scene: The blaze lit up the recesses of the great barn till every wasp's nest and cobweb in the roof were luminous, flinging streaks of red and violet across the tumbled farm ge
Harrisburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
ndred miles, was a pageant without a parallel in the history of the continent or the world. At every halt in the sombre march vast crowds, such as never before had collected together, filed past the catafalque for a glimpse of the dead chieftain's face. Farmers left their farms, workmen left their shops, societies and soldiers marched in solid columns, and the great cities poured forth their population in countless masses. From Washington the funeral train moved to Baltimore, thence to Harrisburg, Philadelphia, New York, Albany, Buffalo, Cleveland, Columbus, Indianapolis, Chicago, and at last to Springfield. As the funeral cortege passed through New York it was reverently gazed upon by a mass of humanity impossible to enumerate. No ovation could be so eloquent as the spectacle of the vast population, hushed and bareheaded under the bright spring sky, gazing upon his coffin. Lincoln's own words over the dead at Gettysburg came to many as the stately car went by: The world will
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
up a good and thorough blockade of their ports. We must march an army into east Tennessee and liberate the Union sentiment there. Finally we must rely on the people gave the Union cause great advance toward the entire redemption of Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri from the presence of rebel armies and the prevalence of rebel i marked by Lincoln's second Presidential campaign, he, and Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee, for Vice-President, having been nominated at Baltimore on the 8th of June. ngland States, New York, Pennsylvania, all the Western States, West Virginia, Tennessee, Louisiana, Arkansas, and the newly admitted State of Nevada. McClellan carrn had already made that grandest march of modern times, from the mountains of Tennessee through Georgia to the sea, while Grant, with stolid indifference to public cteadily on through swamp and ravine to Richmond. Thomas had defeated Hood in Tennessee, sending the latter back with his army demoralized, cut in pieces, and ruined
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
the world bad. About one week after the battle of Bull run, relates another old friend — Whitney — from Illinois, I made a call on Mr. Lincoln, having no business except to give him some presents which the nuns at the Osage Mission school in Kansas had sent to him through me. A Cabinet meeting had just adjourned, and I was directed to go at once to his room. He was keeping at bay a throng of callers, but, noticing me enter, arose and greeted me with his old-time cordiality. After the roomr having been baptized, he was at a loss to know what name to adopt, but after making it a subject of prayer he took the name of Boston, in honor of the place of his conversion. He was ever undisciplined and erratic. He is said to be living in Kansas, and draws a pension from the Government. Five of the conspirators were tried, and three, Payne, Harold, and Mrs. Surratt, were hanged. Dr. Mudd was sent to the Dry Tortugas for a period of years, and there did such good work among the yello
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 20
est: I had given notice that at one o'clock on the 31st of January I would call a vote on the proposed constitutional amendment abolishing slavery in the United States. The opposition caught up a report that morning that Peace Commissioners were on the way to the city or were in the city. Had this been true I think the prop discovered by Archbishop Hughes, and by the courtesy of the Italian Government, though the extradition laws did not cover this case, was delivered over to the United States for trial. At his first trial the jury hung: at the second, in which Edwards Pierrepont was the Government counsel, Surratt got off on the plea of limitationseat price. Generations of Americans yet unborn, and humanity everywhere, for years to come will mourn the horrors and sacrifices of the first civil war in the United States; but above the blood of its victims, above the bones of its dead, above the ashes of desolate hearths, will arise the colossal figure of Abraham Lincoln as the
Springfield (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
funeral at the White House. conveying the remains of the dead chieftain to Springfield. the tribute of Henry Ward Beecher. the funeral at Springfield. the captuSpringfield. the capture and death of Booth. the arrest, trial, and execution of his fellow conspirators. The outlines of Mr. Lincoln's Presidential career are alone sufficient to filr for immediate peace. In the following letter to James C. Conkling SPRINGFIELD, Ill., January 11, 1889. Jesse W. Weir, Esq. Dear Sir: I enclose you a cough the medium of the letter. Yours truly, James C. Conkling. of Springfield, Ill., in reply to an invitation to attend a mass meeting of Unconditional Unio Albany, Buffalo, Cleveland, Columbus, Indianapolis, Chicago, and at last to Springfield. As the funeral cortege passed through New York it was reverently gazed ds, pleads for fidelity, for law, for liberty. The funeral train reached Springfield on the 3d of May. The casket was borne to the State House and placed in Rep
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
got a telegraph despatch from some friends in Illinois urging him to come out and help set things ri chose, but that he could probably do best in Illinois. Upon that he shook hands with me and hurriewas an associate of his in the Legislature of Illinois, and who was in Washington when the engagemen, relates another old friend — Whitney — from Illinois, I made a call on Mr. Lincoln, having no busir several odd characters whom we both knew in Illinois. While thus engaged General James was announesident was closeted with an old Hoosier from Illinois, and was telling dirty yarns while the countrional Union men, to be held at the Capitol of Illinois, on the 3rd day of September, has been receiver days I had practised law on the circuit in Illinois. My clients had been sentenced, and unless tglesby, Senator Yates, and other friends from Illinois. He was invited by the manager of Ford's theor the journey to the home of the deceased in Illinois. On the following day (April 21) the funeral
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