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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
ilked his own cow, and sawed his own wood. Mr. Lincoln and his wife agreed moderately well. Frequently Mrs. Lincoln's temper would get the better of her. If she became furious, as she often did, her husband tried to pay no attention to her. He would sometimes laugh at her, but generally he would pick up one of the children and walk off. I have heard her say that if Mr. Lincoln had remained at home more she could have loved him better. One day while Mr. Lincoln was absent — he had gone to Chicago to try a suit in the United States Court — his wife and I formed a conspiracy to take off the roof and raise his house. It was originally a frame structure one story and a half high. When Lincoln returned he met a gentleman on the sidewalk and, looking at his own house and manifesting great surprise, inquired: Stranger, can you tell me where Lincoln lives? The gentleman gave him the necessary information, and Lincoln gravely entered his own premises. --Statement, James Gourly, February 9
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
devotion to the truth. his weak points.--cool and masterly power of statement. simplicity and candor: easy of approach and thoroughly democratic. his presence a charm, and his conversation a sweet recollection. a leader of the people. strong with the masses. a conservative statesman. the central figure of our national history. the sublime type of our civilization. the man for the hour. Soon after the death of Mr. Lincoln Dr. J. G. Holland came out to Illinois from his home in Massachusetts to gather up materials for a life of the dead President. The gentlemen spent several days with me, and I gave him all the assistance that lay in my power. I was much pleased with him, and awaited with not a little interest the appearance of his book. I felt sure that even after my long and intimate acquaintance with Mr. Lincoln I never fully knew and understood him, and I therefore wondered what sort of a description Dr. Holland, after interviewing Lincoln's old-time friends, would ma
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
was originally a frame structure one story and a half high. When Lincoln returned he met a gentleman on the sidewalk and, looking at his own house and manifesting great surprise, inquired: Stranger, can you tell me where Lincoln lives? The gentleman gave him the necessary information, and Lincoln gravely entered his own premises. --Statement, James Gourly, February 9, 1866. If a friend met or passed him, and he awoke from his reverie, something would remind him of a story he had heard in Indiana, and tell it he would, and there was no alternative but to listen. Thus, I repeat, stood and walked and talked this singular man. He was odd, but when that gray eye and that face and those features were lit up by the inward soul in fires of emotion, then it was that all those apparently ugly features sprang into organs of beauty or disappeared in the sea of inspiration that often flooded his face. Sometimes it appeared as if Lincoln's soul was fresh from its Creator. I have asked t
America (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
did not know it; that he was so far from being a religious man or a Christian that the less said upon that subject the better; that he was the most cunning man in America, and that he had not a particle of cunning in him; that he had the strongest personal attachments, and that he had no personal attachments at all — only a general organization to do this. His labor was great and continuous. The truth about Mr. Lincoln is that he read less and thought more than any man in his sphere in America. No man can put his finger on any great book written in the last or present century that he read thoroughly. When young he read the Bible, and when of age he res acknowledged now to have been a great man but the question is what made him great. I repeat, that he read less and thought more than any man of his standing in America, if not in the world. He possessed originality and power of thought in an eminent degree. Besides his well established reputation for caution, he was concentra
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 21
se name, for certain reasons, I am constrained to withhold. I still retain the original Ms. written by him twenty years ago. I am particularly requested, he says, to write out my opinion of the mind, of Abraham Lincoln, late President of the United States, and I consent to do so without any other motive than to comply with the request of a brother lawyer, for, if I know myself, no other motive would induce me to do it, because, while Mr. Lincoln and I were always good friends, I believe myselfnerally he would pick up one of the children and walk off. I have heard her say that if Mr. Lincoln had remained at home more she could have loved him better. One day while Mr. Lincoln was absent — he had gone to Chicago to try a suit in the United States Court — his wife and I formed a conspiracy to take off the roof and raise his house. It was originally a frame structure one story and a half high. When Lincoln returned he met a gentleman on the sidewalk and, looking at his own house and m
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
Abraham Lincoln will always be an interesting historical character. His strong, honest, sagacious, and noble life will always possess a peculiar charm. Had it not been for his conservative statesmanship, his supreme confidence in the wisdom of the people, his extreme care in groping his way among facts and before ideas, this nation might have been two governments to-day. The low and feeble circulation of his blood; his healthful irritability, which responded so slowly to the effects of stimuli; the strength of his herculean frame; his peculiar organism, conserving its force; his sublime patience; his wonderful endurance; his great hand and heart, saved this country from division, when division meant its irreparable ruin. The central figure of our national history, the sublime type of our civilization, posterity, with the record of his career and actions before it, will decree that, whether Providence so ordained it or not, Abraham Lincoln was the man for the hour. The End.
Sangamon (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
fine him as a statesman, as an orator, as an executive of the nation, and as a man. They developed in all the walks of his life; they were his law; they were his nature, they were Abraham Lincoln. This long, bony, sad man floated down the Sangamon river in a frail canoe in the spring of 1831. Like a piece of driftwood he lodged at last, without a history, strange, penniless, and alone. In sight of the capital of Illinois, in the fatigue of daily toil he struggled for the necessaries of life. Thirty years later this same peculiar man left the Sangamon river, backed by friends, by power, by the patriotic prayers of millions of people, to be the ruler of the greatest nation in the world. As the leader of a brave people in their desperate struggle for national existence, Abraham Lincoln will always be an interesting historical character. His strong, honest, sagacious, and noble life will always possess a peculiar charm. Had it not been for his conservative statesmanship, his
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 21
d will have melted from sight. Mr. Lincoln was six feet four inches high, and when he left the city of his home for Washington was fifty-one years old, having good health and no gray hairs, or but few, on his head. He was thin, wiry, sinewy, rawage over other men in public life. No man in Americascarcely a man in the world — could have stood what Lincoln did in Washington and survived through more than one term of the Presidency. When he walked he moved cautiously but firmly; his long ally as inactive. I used to advise him to take blue-mass pills, related Stuart, and he did take them before he went to Washington, and for five months while he was President, but when I came on to Congress he told me he had ceased using them becauseso desperately for the little glory or lesser salary the small offices afforded. He made this remark to me one day in Washington: If ever this free people — this Government — is utterly demoralized, it will come from this human struggle for office <
Lincoln, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
ious faith. His sad, melancholy face excited their sympathy, and when the dark days came it was their heart-strings that entwined and sustained him. Sympathy, we are told, is one of the strongest and noblest incentives to human action. With the sympathy and love of the people to sustain him, Lincoln had unlimited power over them; he threw an invisible and weightless harness over them, and drove them through disaster and desperation to final victory. The trust and worship by the people of Lincoln were the result of his simple character. He held himself not aloof from the masses. He became one of them. They feared together, they struggled together, they hoped together: thus melted and moulded into one, they became one in thought, one in will, one in action. If Lincoln cautiously awaited the full development of the last fact in the great drama before he acted, when longer waiting would be a crime, he knew that the people were determinedly at his back. Thus, when a blow was struck
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
on. the man for the hour. Soon after the death of Mr. Lincoln Dr. J. G. Holland came out to Illinois from his home in Massachusetts to gather up materials for a life of the dead President. The gee extent of this peculiar tendency to gloom. One of Lincoln's colleagues in the Legislature of Illinois is authority for the statement coming from Lincoln himself that this mental depression became sd speeches will prove this; but his speeches before the courts -especially the Supreme Court of Illinois--if they had been preserved, would demonstrate it still more plainly. Here he demanded time tois friends, and had lost no opportunity to abuse them, induced Lincoln to go to the Governor of Illinois and recommend him for an important office in the State Militia. There being no principle at ste lodged at last, without a history, strange, penniless, and alone. In sight of the capital of Illinois, in the fatigue of daily toil he struggled for the necessaries of life. Thirty years later thi
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