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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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was issued September 10, 1860, and sent October 30, 1860, to the Register for delivery.--Letter Jos. S. Wilson Acting Commissioner Land Office, June 27, 1865. The return of the Black Hawk warriors to New Salem occurred in the month of August, but a short time before the general election. A new Legislature was to be chosen, and as Lincoln had declared to his comrades in the army he would, and in obedience to the effusive declaration of principles which he had issued over his signature in March, before he went to the war, he presented himself to the people of his newly adopted county as a candidate for the Legislature. It is not necessary to enter into an account of the political conditions in Illinois at that time, or the effect had on the same by those who had in charge the governmental machinery. Lincoln's course is all that interests us. Though he may not have distinctly avowed himself a Whig, yet, as one of his friends asserted, he stood openly on Whig principles. He favor
March 8th (search for this): chapter 6
he singing. Listen to one in which he shows How St. Patrick Came to be Born on the 17th of March. Who composed it or where Lincoln obtained it I have never been able to learn. Ellis says he often inflicted it on the crowds who collected in his store of winter evenings. Here it is: The first factional fight in old Ireland, they say, Was all on account of Saint Patrick's birthday, It was somewhere about midnight without any doubt, And certain it is, it made a great rout. On the eighth day of March, as some people say, St. Patrick at midnight he first saw the day; While others assert 'twas the ninth he was born- 'Twas all a mistake — between midnight and morn. Some blamed the baby, some blamed the clock: Some blamed the doctor, some the crowing cock. With all these close questions sure no one could know, Whether the babe was too fast or the clock was too slow. Some fought for the eighth, for the ninth some would die; He who wouldn't see right would have a black eye. At length
March 17th (search for this): chapter 6
the old sedate down to the schoolboy. Then in a few moments he was as calm and thoughtful as a judge on the bench, and as ready to give advice on the most important matters; fun and gravity grew on him alike. Lincoln's lack of musical adaptation has deprived us of many a song. For a ballad or doggerel he sometimes had quite a liking. He could memorize or recite the lines but some one else had to do the singing. Listen to one in which he shows How St. Patrick Came to be Born on the 17th of March. Who composed it or where Lincoln obtained it I have never been able to learn. Ellis says he often inflicted it on the crowds who collected in his store of winter evenings. Here it is: The first factional fight in old Ireland, they say, Was all on account of Saint Patrick's birthday, It was somewhere about midnight without any doubt, And certain it is, it made a great rout. On the eighth day of March, as some people say, St. Patrick at midnight he first saw the day; While others
age 53, was issued September 10, 1860, and sent October 30, 1860, to the Register for delivery.--Letter Jos. S. Wilson Acting Commissioner Land Office, June 27, 1865. The return of the Black Hawk warriors to New Salem occurred in the month of August, but a short time before the general election. A new Legislature was to be chosen, and as Lincoln had declared to his comrades in the army he would, and in obedience to the effusive declaration of principles which he had issued over his signatur material than that? but after hearing his speech the doctor's opinion was considerably altered, for he declared that Lincoln filled him with amazement; that he knew more than all of the other candidates put together. The election took place in August. Lincoln's friend, John T. Stuart, was also a candidate on the legislative ticket. He encouraged Lincoln's canvas in every way, even at the risk of sacrificing his own chances. But both were elected. The four successful candidates were Dawson
ory in the. Century Magazine, Dawson's vote is fixed at 1370, and Lincoln is thereby made to lead the ticket; but in the second issue of the Sangamon Journal after the election--August 16, 1834--the count is corrected, and Dawson's vote is increased to 1390. Dr. A. W. French, of Springfield, is the possessor of an official return of the votes cast at the New Salem precinct, made out in the handwriting of Lincoln, which also gives Dawson's vote at 1390. Lincoln 1376, Carpenter 1170, and Stuart 1164. At last Lincoln had been elected to the legislature, and by a very flattering majority. In order, as he himself said, to make a decent appearance in the legislature, he had to borrow money to buy suitable clothing and to maintain his new dignity. Coleman Smoot, one of his friends, advanced him two hundred dollars, which he returned, relates the generous Smoot, according to promise. Here we leave our rising young statesman, to take up a different but very interesting period of his hist
olay and Hay history in the. Century Magazine, Dawson's vote is fixed at 1370, and Lincoln is thereby made to lead the ticket; but in the second issue of the Sangamon Journal after the election--August 16, 1834--the count is corrected, and Dawson's vote is increased to 1390. Dr. A. W. French, of Springfield, is the possessor of an official return of the votes cast at the New Salem precinct, made out in the handwriting of Lincoln, which also gives Dawson's vote at 1390. Lincoln 1376, Carpenter 1170, and Stuart 1164. At last Lincoln had been elected to the legislature, and by a very flattering majority. In order, as he himself said, to make a decent appearance in the legislature, he had to borrow money to buy suitable clothing and to maintain his new dignity. Coleman Smoot, one of his friends, advanced him two hundred dollars, which he returned, relates the generous Smoot, according to promise. Here we leave our rising young statesman, to take up a different but very interesting p
e knew more than all of the other candidates put together. The election took place in August. Lincoln's friend, John T. Stuart, was also a candidate on the legislative ticket. He encouraged Lincoln's canvas in every way, even at the risk of sacrificing his own chances. But both were elected. The four successful candidates were Dawson, who received 1390 votes, In all former biographies of Lincoln, including the Nicolay and Hay history in the. Century Magazine, Dawson's vote is fixed at 1370, and Lincoln is thereby made to lead the ticket; but in the second issue of the Sangamon Journal after the election--August 16, 1834--the count is corrected, and Dawson's vote is increased to 1390. Dr. A. W. French, of Springfield, is the possessor of an official return of the votes cast at the New Salem precinct, made out in the handwriting of Lincoln, which also gives Dawson's vote at 1390. Lincoln 1376, Carpenter 1170, and Stuart 1164. At last Lincoln had been elected to the legislatur
ncluding the Nicolay and Hay history in the. Century Magazine, Dawson's vote is fixed at 1370, and Lincoln is thereby made to lead the ticket; but in the second issue of the Sangamon Journal after the election--August 16, 1834--the count is corrected, and Dawson's vote is increased to 1390. Dr. A. W. French, of Springfield, is the possessor of an official return of the votes cast at the New Salem precinct, made out in the handwriting of Lincoln, which also gives Dawson's vote at 1390. Lincoln 1376, Carpenter 1170, and Stuart 1164. At last Lincoln had been elected to the legislature, and by a very flattering majority. In order, as he himself said, to make a decent appearance in the legislature, he had to borrow money to buy suitable clothing and to maintain his new dignity. Coleman Smoot, one of his friends, advanced him two hundred dollars, which he returned, relates the generous Smoot, according to promise. Here we leave our rising young statesman, to take up a different but ve
d Lincoln's canvas in every way, even at the risk of sacrificing his own chances. But both were elected. The four successful candidates were Dawson, who received 1390 votes, In all former biographies of Lincoln, including the Nicolay and Hay history in the. Century Magazine, Dawson's vote is fixed at 1370, and Lincoln is ther to lead the ticket; but in the second issue of the Sangamon Journal after the election--August 16, 1834--the count is corrected, and Dawson's vote is increased to 1390. Dr. A. W. French, of Springfield, is the possessor of an official return of the votes cast at the New Salem precinct, made out in the handwriting of Lincoln, which also gives Dawson's vote at 1390. Lincoln 1376, Carpenter 1170, and Stuart 1164. At last Lincoln had been elected to the legislature, and by a very flattering majority. In order, as he himself said, to make a decent appearance in the legislature, he had to borrow money to buy suitable clothing and to maintain his new dignit
June 30th, 1831 AD (search for this): chapter 6
r waters, the downfall of Denton Offut's varied enterprises and his disappearance from New Salem, followed in rapid succession, and before the spring of 1832 had merged into summer Lincoln found himself a piece of floating driftwood again. Where he might have lodged had not the Black Hawk war intervened can only be a matter of conjecture. A glance at this novel period in his life may not be out of keeping with the purpose of this book. The great Indian chief, Black Hawk, who on the 30th of June, 1831, had entered into an agreement, having all the solemnity of a treaty, with Governor Reynolds and General Gaines that none of his tribe should ever cross the Mississippi to their usual place of residence, nor any part of their old hunting grounds east of the Mississippi, without permission of the President of the United States or the governor of the State of Illinois, had openly broken the compact. On the 6th of April, 1832, he recrossed the Mississippi and marched up Rock River Valley
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