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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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Coleman Smoot (search for this): chapter 6
the. Century Magazine, Dawson's vote is fixed at 1370, and Lincoln is thereby made to lead the ticket; but in the second issue of the Sangamon Journal after the election--August 16, 1834--the count is corrected, and Dawson's vote is increased to 1390. Dr. A. W. French, of Springfield, is the possessor of an official return of the votes cast at the New Salem precinct, made out in the handwriting of Lincoln, which also gives Dawson's vote at 1390. Lincoln 1376, Carpenter 1170, and Stuart 1164. At last Lincoln had been elected to the legislature, and by a very flattering majority. In order, as he himself said, to make a decent appearance in the legislature, he had to borrow money to buy suitable clothing and to maintain his new dignity. Coleman Smoot, one of his friends, advanced him two hundred dollars, which he returned, relates the generous Smoot, according to promise. Here we leave our rising young statesman, to take up a different but very interesting period of his history.
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 6
days, one of our mess, an old acquaintance of Lincoln, G. B. Fanchier, shot a dove, and having a gis one of the bystanders relates — ensued, and Lincoln, noticing one of his friends about to succumbn Berry could not have been found; for, while Lincoln at one end of the store was dispensing politiAlmighty! I exclaimed, and passed on. But Lincoln kept on at his studies. Wherever he was and ntly assisted him in the store. He says that Lincoln was fond of short, spicy stories one and two out apparent difficulty relate it. In fact, Mr. Lincoln's fame as a storyteller spread far and widehe same table with them. As a society man, Lincoln was singularly deficient while he lived in Ney hand. It remains a matter of surprise that Lincoln was able to retain his popularity with the ho the city under his administration as Mayor. Lincoln, I know, respected and admired him. After Linthority for the statement that her father and Lincoln frequently sat up till midnight engrossed in[55 more...]
William Kirkpatrick (search for this): chapter 6
n the lines. The captain could not remember the proper command to turn the company end-wise, and the situation was becoming decidedly embarrassing, when one of those thoughts born of the depths of despair came to his rescue. Facing the lines he shouted: Halt! This company will break ranks for two minutes and form again on the other side of the gate. The manoeuvre was successfully executed. in Schuyler county, where, much to his surprise, he was elected captain of the company over William Kirkpatrick. A recital of the campaign that followed, in the effort to drive the treacherous Indians back, or a description of the few engagements — none of which reached the dignity of a battle — which took place, have in no wise been overlooked by the historians of Illinois and of the Black Hawk war. With the exception of those things which relate to Lincoln alone I presume it would be needless to attempt to add anything to what has so thoroughly and truthfully been told. On being elected
William Berry (search for this): chapter 6
nvass. defeat. partnership in the store with Berry. the trade with William Greene. failure of tnterest to an idle, shiftless fellow named William Berry. Soon after Rowan disposed of his to Lincstill more had he asked for it. Lincoln and Berry had been installed in business but a short timtrol of the now enterprising firm of Lincoln & Berry. They subsequently absorbed the remnant of a ssigning it to someone else in another trade. Berry gave his note to James Herndon, Lincoln his to Rowan Herndon, while Lincoln & Berry as a firm, executed their obligation to Greene, Radford, and he store was dispensing political information, Berry at the other was disposing of the firm's liquo to Shakespeare and Burns was only equalled by Berry's attention to spigot and barrel. That the lahey in turn had failed and fled. The death of Berry following soon after, released him from the pa — a relic of the unfortunate partnership with Berry. His personal effects were levied on and sold[2 more...]
newspaper, owned the only collection of books and half the property in the village; and in general was the social, and oftentimes the political head of the community. Naturally, therefore the prominence the store gave the merchant attracted Lincoln. But there seemed no favorable opening for him — clerks in New Salem were not in demand just then. My cousins, Rowan and James Herndon, were at that time operating a store, and tiring of their investment and the confinement it necessitated, James sold his interest to an idle, shiftless fellow named William Berry. Soon after Rowan disposed of his to Lincoln. That the latter, who was without means and in search of work, could succeed to the ownership of even a half interest in a concern where but a few days before he would in all probability gladly have exchanged his services for his board, doubtless seems strange to the average young business man of to-day. I once asked Rowan Herndon what induced him to make such liberal terms in
ingfield over an hour in advance of his rival and thus secured the coveted tract of land. By nightfall Lincoln rode leisurely into town and was met by the now radiant Chandler, jubilant over his success. Between the two a friendship sprang up which all the political discords of twenty-five years never shattered nor strained. About this time Lincoln began to extend somewhat his system — if he really ever had a system in anything — of reading. He now began to read the writings of Paine, Volney, and Voltaire. A good deal of religious skepticism existed at New Salem, and there were frequent discussions at the store and tavern, In which Lincoln took part. What views he entertained on religious questions will be more fully detailed in another place. No little of Lincoln's influence with the men of New Salem can be attributed to his extraordinary feats of strength. By an arrangement of ropes and straps, harnessed about his hips, he was enabled one day at the mill to astonish a c
John Dawson (search for this): chapter 6
every way, even at the risk of sacrificing his own chances. But both were elected. The four successful candidates were Dawson, who received 1390 votes, In all former biographies of Lincoln, including the Nicolay and Hay history in the. Century Magazine, Dawson's vote is fixed at 1370, and Lincoln is thereby made to lead the ticket; but in the second issue of the Sangamon Journal after the election--August 16, 1834--the count is corrected, and Dawson's vote is increased to 1390. Dr. A. W. FDawson's vote is increased to 1390. Dr. A. W. French, of Springfield, is the possessor of an official return of the votes cast at the New Salem precinct, made out in the handwriting of Lincoln, which also gives Dawson's vote at 1390. Lincoln 1376, Carpenter 1170, and Stuart 1164. At last LincDawson's vote at 1390. Lincoln 1376, Carpenter 1170, and Stuart 1164. At last Lincoln had been elected to the legislature, and by a very flattering majority. In order, as he himself said, to make a decent appearance in the legislature, he had to borrow money to buy suitable clothing and to maintain his new dignity. Coleman Smoot
Black Hawk (search for this): chapter 6
Chapter 5. The Black Hawk war. Lincoln elected captain. under arrest. Protecting the Indian. recollections of a comrade. Lincoln re-enlists as a private. return to New Salem. candidate for the Legislature. the handbill. first political speech. the canvass. defeat. partnership in the store with Berry. the trade with William Greene. failure of the business. law studies. Pettifogging. stories and poetry. Referee in rural sports. deputy surveyor under John Calhoun. studying with Mentor Graham. postmaster at New Salem. the incident with Chandler. feats of strength. second race for the Legislature. election. The departure of the Talisman for deeper waters, the downfall of Denton Offut's varied enterprises and his disappearance from New Salem, followed in rapid succession, and before the spring of 1832 had merged into summer Lincoln found himself a piece of floating driftwood again. Where he might have lodged had not the Black Hawk war intervened can o
Russell Godby (search for this): chapter 6
e a lawyer of himself under such adverse and unpromising circumstances excited comment is not to be wondered at. Russell Godby, an old man who still survives, told me in 1865, that he had often employed Lincoln to do farm work for him, and was surpand attentively reading a book. This being an unusual thing for farm hands in that early day to do, I asked him, relates Godby, what he was reading. I'm not reading, he answered. I'm studying. Studing what? I enquired. Law, sir, was the emphats 1865 the corner was preserved by a mark and pointed out to strangers as an evidence of the young surveyor's skill. Russell Godby, mentioned in the earlier pages of this chapter, presented to me a certificate of survey given to him by Lincoln. It was written January 14, 1834, and is signed J. Calhoun, S. S. C., by A. Lincoln. The survey was made by Lincoln, says Godby, and I gave him as pay for his work two buckskins, which Hannah Armstrong foxed on his pants so that the briers would not
frequently sat barefooted under the shade of a tree near the store, poring over a volume of Chitty or Blackstone, sometimes lying on his back, putting his feet up the tree, which provokes one of his biographers to denote the latter posture as one which might have been unfavorable to mental application, in the case of a man with shorter extremities. That Lincoln's attempt to make a lawyer of himself under such adverse and unpromising circumstances excited comment is not to be wondered at. Russell Godby, an old man who still survives, told me in 1865, that he had often employed Lincoln to do farm work for him, and was surprised to find him one day sitting barefoot on the summit of a wood-pile and attentively reading a book. This being an unusual thing for farm hands in that early day to do, I asked him, relates Godby, what he was reading. I'm not reading, he answered. I'm studying. Studing what? I enquired. Law, sir, was the emphatic response. It was really too much for me, a
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