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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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cal adaptation has deprived us of many a song. For a ballad or doggerel he sometimes had quite a liking. He could memorize or recite the lines but some one else had to do the singing. Listen to one in which he shows How St. Patrick Came to be Born on the 17th of March. Who composed it or where Lincoln obtained it I have never been able to learn. Ellis says he often inflicted it on the crowds who collected in his store of winter evenings. Here it is: The first factional fight in old Ireland, they say, Was all on account of Saint Patrick's birthday, It was somewhere about midnight without any doubt, And certain it is, it made a great rout. On the eighth day of March, as some people say, St. Patrick at midnight he first saw the day; While others assert 'twas the ninth he was born- 'Twas all a mistake — between midnight and morn. Some blamed the baby, some blamed the clock: Some blamed the doctor, some the crowing cock. With all these close questions sure no one could know, W
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
t permission of the President of the United States or the governor of the State of Illinois, had openly broken the compact. On the 6th of April, 1832, he recrossed attle — which took place, have in no wise been overlooked by the historians of Illinois and of the Black Hawk war. With the exception of those things which relate to ited States authorities and those emanating from Captain Lincoln or some other Illinois officer — as at one time was threatened -we need not be told to which side the of the esculent. Once more, at another time, in the extreme northern part of Illinois, we had been very hungry for two days, but suddenly came upon a new cabin at t. It is not necessary to enter into an account of the political conditions in Illinois at that time, or the effect had on the same by those who had in charge the god. He had been educated for the law, but never practiced much after coming to Illinois--taught school in preference. As an instructor he was the popular one of his
Sangamon (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
in an important love affair. In a letter dated May 5, 1866, McNamar says: I corrected at his request some of the grammatical errors in his first address to the voters of Sangamon county, his principal hobby being the navigation of the Sangamon river. The circular is dated March 9, 1832, and addressed to the People of Sangamon county. In it he takes up all the leading questions of the day: railroads, river navigation, internal improvements, and usury. He .dwells particularly on the ntire 208 votes in the precinct he received every one save three. It may not be amiss to explain the cause of this remarkable endorsement of Lincoln by the voters in New Salem. It arose chiefly from his advocacy of the improvement of the Sangamon river. He proposed the digging of a canal a few miles east of the point where the Sangamon enters the Illinois river, thereby giving the former two mouths. This, he explained to the farmers, would prevent the accumulation of back-water and conseq
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
he Mississippi to their usual place of residence, nor any part of their old hunting grounds east of the Mississippi, without permission of the President of the United States or the governor of the State of Illinois, had openly broken the compact. On the 6th of April, 1832, he recrossed the Mississippi and marched up Rock River Valvilities between the officer and his men, a strong bond of affection united them together, and if a contest had arisen over the conflict of orders between the United States authorities and those emanating from Captain Lincoln or some other Illinois officer — as at one time was threatened -we need not be told to which side the Sangr date of February 3, 1882, after detailing reminiscences of Stillman's defeat, says: I have during that time had much fun with the afterwards President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. I remember one time of wrestling with him, two best in three, and ditched him. He was not satisfied, and we tried it in a foot-race for a fi
Dubuque (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
and, and although the tract never yielded him anything he never, so far as my knowledge extends parted with its ownership. In regard to the Bounty Land Warrants issued to Abraham Lincoln for military services during the Black Hawk war as Captain of 4th Illinois Volunteers, the first warrant, No. 52,076, for forty acres (Act of 1850), was issued to Abraham Lincoln, Captain, etc. on the 16th of April, 1852, and was located in his name by his duly appointed attorney, John P. Davis, at Dubuque, Iowa, July 21, 1854, on the north-west quarter of the south-west quarter of section 20, in Township 84, north of Range 39, west, Iowa. A patent as recorded in volume 280, page 21, was issued for this tract to Abraham Lincoln on the 1st of June, 1855, and transmitted the 26th October, 1855, to the Register of delivery. Under the Act of 1855, another Land Warrant, No. 68,465, for 120 acres, was issued to Abraham Lincoln, Captain Illinois Militia, Black Hawk war, on the 22d April, 1856, and
Rushville (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
affair and chicken-stealing expedition is clearly shown in a speech he afterwards made in Congress in exposure of the military pretensions of General Cass. However, in grim, soldierly severity he marched with the Sangamon county contingent to Rushville, While at the rendezvous at Rushville and on the march to the front Lincoln of course drilled his men, and gave them such meager instruction in military tactics as he could impart. Some of the most grotesque things he ever related were descRushville and on the march to the front Lincoln of course drilled his men, and gave them such meager instruction in military tactics as he could impart. Some of the most grotesque things he ever related were descriptions of these drills. In marching one morning at the head of the company, who were following in lines of twenty abreast, it became necessary to pass through a gate much narrower than the lines. The captain could not remember the proper command to turn the company end-wise, and the situation was becoming decidedly embarrassing, when one of those thoughts born of the depths of despair came to his rescue. Facing the lines he shouted: Halt! This company will break ranks for two minutes and
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
erry following soon after, released him from the payment of any notes or debts, and thus Lincoln was left to meet the unhonored obligations of the ill-fated partnership, or avoid their payment by dividing the responsibility and pleading the failure of the business. That he assumed all the liability and set resolutely to work to pay everything, was strictly in keeping with his fine sense of honor and justice. He was a long time meeting these claims, even as late as 1848 sending to me from Washington portions of his salary as Congressman to be applied on the unpaid remnant of the Berry & Lincoln indebtedness — but in time he extinguished it all, even to the last penny. Conscious of his many shortcomings as a merchant, and undaunted by the unfortunate complications from which he had just been released, Lincoln returned to his books. Rowan Herndon, with whom he had been living, having removed to the country, he became for the first time a sojourner at the tavern, as it was then call
Schuyler (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ing in lines of twenty abreast, it became necessary to pass through a gate much narrower than the lines. The captain could not remember the proper command to turn the company end-wise, and the situation was becoming decidedly embarrassing, when one of those thoughts born of the depths of despair came to his rescue. Facing the lines he shouted: Halt! This company will break ranks for two minutes and form again on the other side of the gate. The manoeuvre was successfully executed. in Schuyler county, where, much to his surprise, he was elected captain of the company over William Kirkpatrick. A recital of the campaign that followed, in the effort to drive the treacherous Indians back, or a description of the few engagements — none of which reached the dignity of a battle — which took place, have in no wise been overlooked by the historians of Illinois and of the Black Hawk war. With the exception of those things which relate to Lincoln alone I presume it would be needless to attem
Springfield (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
l, 1856, and was located by himself at Springfield, Illinois, December 27, 1859, on the east half oPappsville, a village eleven miles west of Springfield. After the sale was over and speech-making, John T. Stuart, who was practicing law in Springfield, frequently walking there to return one andost intense order. On the road to and from Springfield he would read and recite from the book he c shrewd young merchant who had come up from Springfield and taken quite a fancy to Lincoln. The twand admired him. After Lincoln's removal to Springfield they frequently held joint debates on polit, and had mounted his horse and started for Springfield. Meanwhile, my neighbors, continued Chandlnt him and put him through. When you reach Springfield put him up at Herndon's tavern and I'll cal to follow on the jaded animal. He reached Springfield over an hour in advance of his rival and th is increased to 1390. Dr. A. W. French, of Springfield, is the possessor of an official return of [3 more...]
Saint Patrick (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
g. For a ballad or doggerel he sometimes had quite a liking. He could memorize or recite the lines but some one else had to do the singing. Listen to one in which he shows How St. Patrick Came to be Born on the 17th of March. Who composed it or where Lincoln obtained it I have never been able to learn. Ellis says he often inflicted it on the crowds who collected in his store of winter evenings. Here it is: The first factional fight in old Ireland, they say, Was all on account of Saint Patrick's birthday, It was somewhere about midnight without any doubt, And certain it is, it made a great rout. On the eighth day of March, as some people say, St. Patrick at midnight he first saw the day; While others assert 'twas the ninth he was born- 'Twas all a mistake — between midnight and morn. Some blamed the baby, some blamed the clock: Some blamed the doctor, some the crowing cock. With all these close questions sure no one could know, Whether the babe was too fast or the clock wa
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