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Browsing named entities in Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography.

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ing and writing about forty letters a day to various people in the different States in his efforts to advance the interest of General Grant's nomination for the Presidency at the convention to be held in May, General Logan and I were kept busy day and night. The intervening months were devoted to the election of delegates in all the States; and I may be mistaken, but I think that more attention was devoted to the character of these delegates than is done at the present time. On my own Thursdays at home during this winter the callers were numerous, including such well-known people as Vinnie Ream, the sculptor (now Mrs. Hoxie, wife of General Hoxie); Mary Clemmer Ames, Mrs. Claflin, Mrs. Ramsay, Mrs. James G. Blaine, the wife of the German ambassador, wives of members of the Supreme Court, cabinet, Senate, House of Representatives, and many others. On Saturday, February 7, we went to Mrs. Hayes's last Saturday-afternoon reception. We were courteously escorted by one of the ushers
ur lives. He of course made an address, which is supposed to have had a great influence over us, but I am afraid we did not remember long the many injunctions he laid upon us. In those halcyon days, in addition to our studies and school drudgery, girls of sixteen and upward had to make their own clothes, including a graduation dress of sheer, fine muslin, together with the slip to wear under it. All this was made by hand, which meant many hours of careful sewing after school hours, on Saturdays and holidays (forgive the term, under such circumstances). They not only had to make their own clothes, but had to assist the sisters in making the white dresses for the ten or a dozen orphans whom the sisters had on their hands to clothe and educate. Good-natured, jolly Sister Superior Isabella would journey by water to Louisville, Kentucky, to buy the material for the dresses, together with many bolts of blue ribbon for sashes and bow-knots, which every girl was obliged to wear on comme
and many times, as a child, I have wondered if some of the ministers would or could perform the miracle of the loaves and fishes, to feed the hungry legions who congregated around the tables of the much-imposed-upon householders. For months beaux saved up their best clothes, and the belles their choicest finery, for camp-meeting. The best horses in the whole region were pampered and groomed so that they could be ridden to camp-meeting, as if they were to be exhibited at a county fair. On Sundays the townspeople as well as those in the country, all went carrying great baskets filled with eatables, as if going to a picnic, and, after listening to the ten-thirty clack service, groups of people could be seen sitting all around under the trees, feasting and enjoying themselves as on a holiday excursion. They would then wander up and down the banks of the stream of water — a requisite of an eligible site for camp-meeting grounds-or visit at the different camps. They started to return t
idering, knitting, repairing our clothes, and sometimes in feasting and dancing. We were allowed to go into the parlor to be introduced to the parents of the girls who came to visit them, and on these occasions we were coached as to the manner of entering the room, saluting the guests, and how to withdraw without betraying awkwardness. Sister Isabella gave us periodical lectures, especially if any of the girls had been guilty of violation of the rules of the academy. We used to enjoy the Sundays. After service we would go out on the lawn or to the window to watch the people who came to church at Saint Vincent's. Some of them were on horseback, some on foot, and others in every conceivable kind of vehicle of those early days. I remember, as if it had occurred yesterday, the visit of Bishop Spaulding and the great to-do that we made of his coming to Saint Vincent's. We all kissed his ring, and thought it was the greatest event of our lives. He of course made an address, which is s
them each an hour and the contrary would be true. This does not mean that Douglas was not sincere. No man could be more patriotic or sincere than Stephen A. Douglas was. He was as earnest in his belief in the rightness of his position as Lincoln was in the rightness of his; and when he found that he had been in error no man of pride ever acted more courageously in admitting it. Immediately after followed the first meeting of the campaign, Mr. Lincoln having spoken on the evening of the 10th, in Chicago, arraigning Mr. Douglas in the strongest terms. The friends of Mr. Douglas planned for a grand demonstration at Springfield on the 17th. On the morning of the 16th, on a special train, beautifully decorated, the engine bearing the motto, S. A. Douglas, the Champion of Popular Sovereignty, a large committee with a fine band of music accompanied Douglas to Springfield. At every town en route flags were flying, cannons were booming, and immense crowds were gathered at the station.
itics in an offensive sense, it was to explain my own motives for action and not as descriptive. Wishing you all honor and happiness on this earth, I am, as always, your friend, W. T. Sherman. This letter General Logan acknowledged promptly, responding cordially to the sentiments of regard expressed by his beloved commander. United States Senate, Washington, D. C., Sunday, Feb. 18, 1883. General W. T. Sherman, My dear Sir:-- I have delayed acknowledging your letter of the 11th inst. up to this time for the reason that I have been so much engaged every moment of the time that I could not sooner do so; for your expression of kindly feelings toward me I tender my grateful acknowledgments. I am inclined, however, my dear general, to the opinion that, had you fully understood the situation in which I was placed at the times mentioned by you, that I returned North from the army for the purpose of taking part in the political contests then going on, that perhaps your cri
t of the pressure of ordinarily well-behaved, refined people who were determined to clasp the hands of General and Mrs. Grant. Strong men were unable to restrain the crowd. Finally, the receiving party made their escape through a window into a rear hallway, up a back stair to an upper story. It took some time to convince the mass of human beings jammed in the main halls, on the stairs, in the reception rooms and parlors, that General and Mrs. Grant had retired. On the morning of the thirteenth, at ten o'clock, a superb reception was tendered General Grant by the Union Veteran's Club, at McVicker's Theatre, which was decorated from pit to galleries. The meeting was called to order by General Chetlain. On the platform stood a goddess of liberty surrounded by lovely young ladies, each representing a State and bearing a placard Welcome. At the feet of the goddess sat five very small girls representing the territories. On the platform as speakers were General Logan, General Woodf
s as earnest in his belief in the rightness of his position as Lincoln was in the rightness of his; and when he found that he had been in error no man of pride ever acted more courageously in admitting it. Immediately after followed the first meeting of the campaign, Mr. Lincoln having spoken on the evening of the 10th, in Chicago, arraigning Mr. Douglas in the strongest terms. The friends of Mr. Douglas planned for a grand demonstration at Springfield on the 17th. On the morning of the 16th, on a special train, beautifully decorated, the engine bearing the motto, S. A. Douglas, the Champion of Popular Sovereignty, a large committee with a fine band of music accompanied Douglas to Springfield. At every town en route flags were flying, cannons were booming, and immense crowds were gathered at the station. At Bloomington, where, after speaking, Douglas was to rest at the Loudon House for a few hours, there were five thousand people (a great number for those days) gathered at the
Stephen A. Douglas was. He was as earnest in his belief in the rightness of his position as Lincoln was in the rightness of his; and when he found that he had been in error no man of pride ever acted more courageously in admitting it. Immediately after followed the first meeting of the campaign, Mr. Lincoln having spoken on the evening of the 10th, in Chicago, arraigning Mr. Douglas in the strongest terms. The friends of Mr. Douglas planned for a grand demonstration at Springfield on the 17th. On the morning of the 16th, on a special train, beautifully decorated, the engine bearing the motto, S. A. Douglas, the Champion of Popular Sovereignty, a large committee with a fine band of music accompanied Douglas to Springfield. At every town en route flags were flying, cannons were booming, and immense crowds were gathered at the station. At Bloomington, where, after speaking, Douglas was to rest at the Loudon House for a few hours, there were five thousand people (a great number for
Thomas said: Yes, that's it, and I think, to insure success, that there should be not only harmony but entire cordiality between the army commanders. Sherman's answer was that he could not afford to put Logan in command under such circumstances. Finally they sat down and discussed the merits of the different generals and settled upon Howard. I have, said Sherman, always been a friend to Logan in a great many different ways. He was a good soldier. He handled the army splendidly on the 22d, and in his movement to the right. But you see I had a great responsibility and had to do the best I could under the circumstances. I consider Logan the representative volunteer general of the war. While I never knew the exact facts in the matter, I know the Army of the Tennessee wanted Logan and was greatly disappointed when Sherman went outside of it for a commander. The officers and men felt that the little army that had had for its commanders Grant, Sherman, McPherson, and Logan ha
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