hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
John A. Logan 1,269 25 Browse Search
Nellie Grant 462 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 342 6 Browse Search
Chicago (Illinois, United States) 216 0 Browse Search
Illinois (Illinois, United States) 208 0 Browse Search
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) 198 0 Browse Search
Robert T. Lincoln 153 3 Browse Search
James G. Blaine 150 4 Browse Search
United States (United States) 128 0 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 126 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography. Search the whole document.

Found 588 total hits in 145 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Galesburg (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ur rooms, sitting in an easy chair listening to good music, stories, and anecdotes, or telling stories themselves. General Logan led them on by his own jocular disposition into forgetfulness of the passing of time. The newspaper correspondents-friends and foes-came and went at their pleasure. There was nothing going on that they were not permitted to know all about; hence they could not in conscience write anything disagreeable or indulge in criticism. Colonel Clark E. Carr, of Galesburg, Illinois; General T. O. Osborne, of Chicago; General Thomas Scott; General Berry; Colonel William L. Distin; Colonel Beardsley, of Rock Island; Judge R. S. Tuthill; Colonel E. S. McCook; Colonel R. N. Pearson; Colonel Rowett S. D. Phelps; Cadet Taylor; General Shaffer; Captain Isaac Clements; and a host of others were in and out continually, doing far more effective work in influencing voters than if they had adopted the methods that are said to have been in vogue in later years. It was a new
Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
y as representative American women. In the throng there were such distinguished persons as Gail Hamilton-Mrs. Blaine's cousin-Sydney Hyde, Mary Clemmer Ames, Miss Foote, John W. Forney, Ben Perley Poore, and many other representatives of literary circles, while Senators Fenton, Conkling, Chandler, Bayard, Morton, Ferry, Howard, Drake, Carpenter, Thurman, Edmunds, Frelinghuysen, Fessenden, William Pitt Kellogg, and hosts of others represented the Senate. Of the House, there was Wilson, of Iowa; Frye and Blaine, of Maine; Hawley, of Connecticut; Pomeroy, of Kansas; Farnsworth and Burchard, of Illinois, and many others whose names are associated with the stirring events of that era. To this brilliant galaxy were added our army, navy, and marine corps, all in the full-dress uniforms of their respective branches — of the service, wearing all the medals and gold lace to which they were entitled. Almost all of them were accompanied by wives or daughters, who, not wishing to be outdo
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
eat fire chairman of the Senate military committee the Abbott ransom case White House New Year's reception, 1872 subsequent social festivities death of Mrs. Bel o'clock in the morning — the streets were full of carriages en route to the White House. Mrs. Grant had invited the ladies of the cabinet and the Supreme Court and uctions that none who came to pay their respects should be excluded from the White House. Consequently, an hour after the programme had been finished along line of citizens and visitors, two abreast, passed through the White House, halting only long enough to speak to President Grant. It was after twelve o'clock when the last one had been gratified by a welcome to the White House. Secretary Fish had the customary breakfast for the Diplomatic Corps, foreign relations committees of bothcial season, and was rapidly followed by state dinners and receptions in the White House, in the homes of the cabinet, in the homes of the Diplomatic Corps, justices
Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
opportunity for political preferment, and to become conspicuous in public affairs, than they would ever have in the North. They expected to profit by the ignorance of the colored people, and in that way to monopolize the offices-both State and national. There were many of these carpetbaggers in Congress, and some of them were a disgrace to that body and to their country. It began to be whispered that some of these gentlemen were selling their appointments to cadetships at West Point and Annapolis, and that one member from North Carolina-one Whittemore, who posed as a Republican and an honest man-had sold a cadetship to West Point for the paltry sum, as I remember it, of three hundred dollars. Charges were made before the military committee. General Logan investigated the matter thoroughly, summoning before the committee all persons who were supposed to have had something to do with the transaction. He succeeded in bringing before that committee indubitable evidence of the trut
Capitol (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
es who are more anxious to please their chief than to disappoint him in not finding material he desires. Three days and three nights we stayed in the back parlor, which was the general's office, working on this case, with the exception of the few hours that General Logan had to go to the Senate to be present during the session. We had our meals served in our rooms, and never went to bed during the three days and nights except for an hour or so in the early morning. While he was at the Capitol I ran over these various cases, wrote on slips of paper what they were and the points upon which they bore, and marked for him the paragraphs that were most important. When he came in, as soon as we had our dinner he would take these volumes and read only the paragraphs which I had marked for him. Notwithstanding the digest which I had prepared, it was almost impossible to have his report ready for the meeting of the committee at the end of the week. We had no such helps in those days as
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
State and national. There were many of these carpetbaggers in Congress, and some of them were a disgrace to that body and to their country. It began to be whispered that some of these gentlemen were selling their appointments to cadetships at West Point and Annapolis, and that one member from North Carolina-one Whittemore, who posed as a Republican and an honest man-had sold a cadetship to West Point for the paltry sum, as I remember it, of three hundred dollars. Charges were made before tWest Point for the paltry sum, as I remember it, of three hundred dollars. Charges were made before the military committee. General Logan investigated the matter thoroughly, summoning before the committee all persons who were supposed to have had something to do with the transaction. He succeeded in bringing before that committee indubitable evidence of the truth of the accusation. Led by General Logan, the committee reported the matter fully to the House with the recommendation that Whittemore be expelled. General Ben Butler was a conspicuous figure at this session. He was very fond of ant
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
distinguished persons as Gail Hamilton-Mrs. Blaine's cousin-Sydney Hyde, Mary Clemmer Ames, Miss Foote, John W. Forney, Ben Perley Poore, and many other representatives of literary circles, while Senators Fenton, Conkling, Chandler, Bayard, Morton, Ferry, Howard, Drake, Carpenter, Thurman, Edmunds, Frelinghuysen, Fessenden, William Pitt Kellogg, and hosts of others represented the Senate. Of the House, there was Wilson, of Iowa; Frye and Blaine, of Maine; Hawley, of Connecticut; Pomeroy, of Kansas; Farnsworth and Burchard, of Illinois, and many others whose names are associated with the stirring events of that era. To this brilliant galaxy were added our army, navy, and marine corps, all in the full-dress uniforms of their respective branches — of the service, wearing all the medals and gold lace to which they were entitled. Almost all of them were accompanied by wives or daughters, who, not wishing to be outdone in expressing their appreciation of the occasion, had worn their mo
Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ore central location for the capital of the United States than that of the District of Columbia. General Logan championed the movement for the removal of the capital, on the ground that the present location was made at a very early time in the history of the Government, and the vast area west of the Alleghanies had not been considered by white men and was only inhabited by the various tribes of Indians and aborigines that were to be found in what subsequently became the States of Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, and the great territories that have added many new States to the galaxy of the Union. While the movement may have been abortive, and from a historic point of view justly failed, it had the effect of arousing a spirit of pride in the citizens of the District of Columbia, and caused them to become active in the introduction of improvements of all kinds, especially in the municipal government. They succeeded in organizing a Territorial government for the District and in appoi
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
f the capital to Saint Louis improvement of Washington a result of this movement Reducing the armycredit for the transformation of the city of Washington from a slow-going Southern city of magnificeapital to the West might have succeeded, and Washington would never have attained its great beauty a and filled up the deep chasms that had made Washington unattractive and impracticable. Pennsylvaniin authority in the Territorial government. Washington had been fortunate in having secured years benthusiastically in their scheme to beautify Washington, and in a few years they had accomplished suction of the earlier commissioners in making Washington the immovable capital of this great country.y from Chicago, were continually arriving in Washington. A majority of them hastened to find us andnkind. In November, 1871, we returned to Washington and removed to No. 8 Grant Place, to a housethe veil in the Convent of the Visitation at Washington; the distinguished Spanish minister and his [13 more...]
Mexico, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
firmed forever the action of the earlier commissioners in making Washington the immovable capital of this great country. This question created the most intense interest, and the galleries of Congress were crowded day after day. Be it said to the everlasting shame of the then citizens of Washington, and of many representatives in Congress, that they heaped such ignominy upon Governor Shepherd and his associates that he departed from Washington a heart-broken man, and sought a home in old Mexico, where he lived until his death a few years ago. Others of his associates were accused of limitless graft, and their families have since had a great struggle for existence. Time has vindicated these men, but, alas, too late for them to have had the satisfaction of knowing that their herculean achievements had at last been appreciated. Another question that was all-absorbing was the reduction of the army to a peace basis. It might have been easy to solve the problem of mustering out reg
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...