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Dusenberry (search for this): chapter 12
n's services to Grant in Congress Hostility of Sumner and Schurz the credit Mobilier scandal entertainment of the Japanese embassy Republican convention at Philadelphia Grant and Wilson nominated illness of my father journey to Utah Bishop Dusenberry of the Mormon Church the 1872 campaign the Liberal Republican convention nomination of Horace Greeley Mr. Greeley's Bereavement, defeat, illness, and death Grant's second inauguration the New cabinet death of my father. Politicallr he had improved and was quite on the road to recovery, he wanted me to meet his Mormon friends of the city of Provo. Among them were many of the highest intelligence and refinement, and I used to enjoy hearing them talk. I remember one Bishop Dusenberry, an Englishman, who was as fine a looking man as I have ever seen. Though a bishop of the church, nothing would induce him to practise polygamy. He had one wife and lived handsomely in a substantial house surrounded by beautiful grounds.
J. B. McCullough (search for this): chapter 12
r the inaugural ceremonies left the city as rapidly as they could get trains to carry them away. The newspaper men and women then in Washington were among the most brilliant of the guild. All the metropolitan newspapers had bureaus in Washington, presided over by a coterie of men who were the equals, if not the superiors, intellectually of the men at the head of the bureaus of the metropolitan newspapers of to-day. Among them were such men as Whitelaw Reid of the New York Tribune; J. B. McCullough of the Saint Louis Democrat; Alexander McClure of the Philadelphia Ledger; Horace White, Mr. Sheehan, of the Chicago Times; Murat Halstead, L. A. Gobright, E. B. Wight, George A. Townsend, J. Russell Young, subsequently librarian of the Congressional Library, W. Scott Smith, Eli Perkins, Charles Lanman, Don Piatt, Ben Perley Poore, E. V. Smalley, Mark Twain, Frederick Douglass, and a host of correspondents who have made enviable reputations in their calling. Among the women reporters
J. Russell Young (search for this): chapter 12
olitan newspapers had bureaus in Washington, presided over by a coterie of men who were the equals, if not the superiors, intellectually of the men at the head of the bureaus of the metropolitan newspapers of to-day. Among them were such men as Whitelaw Reid of the New York Tribune; J. B. McCullough of the Saint Louis Democrat; Alexander McClure of the Philadelphia Ledger; Horace White, Mr. Sheehan, of the Chicago Times; Murat Halstead, L. A. Gobright, E. B. Wight, George A. Townsend, J. Russell Young, subsequently librarian of the Congressional Library, W. Scott Smith, Eli Perkins, Charles Lanman, Don Piatt, Ben Perley Poore, E. V. Smalley, Mark Twain, Frederick Douglass, and a host of correspondents who have made enviable reputations in their calling. Among the women reporters who wielded influential pens as correspondents of important newspapers were Mary Clemmer Ames, Mrs. Lippincott, Mrs. H. M. Barnum, Mrs. Olivia Briggs, Mrs. Coggswell, Mrs. and Miss Snead, and Miss Mary E. He
emselves more comfortable by depositing part of their luggage on one of the seats of my section. They were to stop in Salt Lake to learn something of the wonders of that famous city, and therefore attended me to the hotel. Doctor Taggart met me soon after my arrival and relieved me by saying that my father was better, but that he was still very ill. He told me that he had made arrangements for me to go to Provo on the stage-coach. The stage line at that time was under the management of Gilmer and Saulsbury, men from Illinois, and, of course, I felt quite sure that I would have every care and attention. The railroad only extended a few miles out of Salt Lake, where we were met by a stagecoach. At the terminus of the railroad there was nothing but an empty freight-car for a depot, and a few tents and cloth houses, where it seemed to me there was nothing but gamblingplaces and whiskey saloons. Near the car which was used as a depot were a number of barrels upon which were laid so
Ulysses Grant (search for this): chapter 12
probable that General Logan's defence of President Grant against the attacks of Senator John B. Gogs greater credit in rendering service to President Grant in the halls of Congress than to any otheten attributes evil to the motives of rivals. Grant was naturally the only barrier in the road to om the shafts of the designing were levelled. Grant was held responsible for every act of his appohigs and Abolitionists. A person once told Grant that Sumner did not believe in the Bible. Gran America, and one in Japan. One is named Ulysses Grant, and one other Roscoe Conkling. They werethe savage attacks of Sumner and Schurz on General Grant and the leaders of the regular Republican arriage as we return. Louis, overhearing President Grant, preceded them to the carriage. Imagine e. When they arrived at the White House, President Grant took Jack by the hand and led him into thd Miss Snead, and Miss Mary E. Healey. General Grant soon nominated his cabinet, retaining thos[27 more...]
Nina J. Lunt (search for this): chapter 12
he committee on music had provided many bands. The weather abated not a whit or tittle, and, as night came on, it seemed to grow colder and colder, and yet every one felt they must carry out the inaugural programme. We had as our guest Miss Nina J. Lunt, of Chicago. Mr. E. B. Wight, representative of the Chicago Tribune had invited Miss Lunt and our daughter, then in her teens, to go to the inaugural ball, and, while Dollie was not in society, we thought it might be an event she would likMiss Lunt and our daughter, then in her teens, to go to the inaugural ball, and, while Dollie was not in society, we thought it might be an event she would like to remember as long as she lived. Therefore we gave our consent to have her go with Mr. Wight. After they had gone, and before we could reach them, we became very anxious indeed, because of the growing intensity of the cold. Mr. Wight was very careful, and through his influence in newspaper circles, was able to get them a most comfortable position, and they suffered no inconvenience or ill-effects from this, our daughter's first experience at an inaugural ball. Like all young people, she
Columbus Delano (search for this): chapter 12
rs were Mary Clemmer Ames, Mrs. Lippincott, Mrs. H. M. Barnum, Mrs. Olivia Briggs, Mrs. Coggswell, Mrs. and Miss Snead, and Miss Mary E. Healey. General Grant soon nominated his cabinet, retaining those who had served during his first term, with the exception of the Secretary of the Treasury. The members of the cabinet were: Hamilton Fish, Secretary of State; William A. Richardson, Secretary of the Treasury; W. W. Belknap, Secretary of War; George M. Robeson, Secretary of the Navy; Columbus Delano, Secretary of the Interior; John A. Creswell, Postmaster-General; George H. Williams, Attorney-General. Congress resumed its treadmill routine, with now and again outbursts of criticism and vituperation heaped upon President Grant. On March 9 our friend Doctor John P. Taggart, of Salt Lake City, telegraphed General Logan that my father had passed away from a return of the meningitis from which he had suffered the summer previous. There were three of my mother's children with my fat
Horace White (search for this): chapter 12
avage attacks of Sumner and Schurz on General Grant and the leaders of the regular Republican party, what they called the Liberal Republican party was organized by such ambitious newspaper men as Whitelaw Reid (our late ambassador to England), Horace White, Alexander McClure, Henry Watterson, Samuel Bowles, Murat Halstead, and a number of disgruntled Republicans, who held a convention in Cincinnati, May i, 1872, and after three or four days farcical sessions nominated Horace Greeley for Presidenlly of the men at the head of the bureaus of the metropolitan newspapers of to-day. Among them were such men as Whitelaw Reid of the New York Tribune; J. B. McCullough of the Saint Louis Democrat; Alexander McClure of the Philadelphia Ledger; Horace White, Mr. Sheehan, of the Chicago Times; Murat Halstead, L. A. Gobright, E. B. Wight, George A. Townsend, J. Russell Young, subsequently librarian of the Congressional Library, W. Scott Smith, Eli Perkins, Charles Lanman, Don Piatt, Ben Perley Poo
Samuel Bowles (search for this): chapter 12
his reputation, it was hard to arouse enthusiasm for a man of neutral character. The world knows the result of the campaign and of the sad death of Vice-President Wilson. As an outcome of the savage attacks of Sumner and Schurz on General Grant and the leaders of the regular Republican party, what they called the Liberal Republican party was organized by such ambitious newspaper men as Whitelaw Reid (our late ambassador to England), Horace White, Alexander McClure, Henry Watterson, Samuel Bowles, Murat Halstead, and a number of disgruntled Republicans, who held a convention in Cincinnati, May i, 1872, and after three or four days farcical sessions nominated Horace Greeley for President and B. Gratz Brown, ex-Governor of Missouri, for Vice-President. One might be forgiven for saying that this was a cruel attempt on the part of ambitious young men who had nothing to lose and all to gain if they could succeed in electing Father Greeley President of the United States. The whole at
Cornelius A. Logan (search for this): chapter 12
ition to the President's renomination in 1872 Logan's services to Grant in Congress Hostility of f the administration. It is probable that General Logan's defence of President Grant against the abeen equalled in fervor and vehemence. To General Logan probably belongs greater credit in renderiitable venture suffered nothing whatever. General Logan, who had invested in the stock, suffered nhington spacious enough for such affairs. General Logan was on the committee for their entertainmers, making visits to Japan and returning. General Logan and I were dining at their home one night,ned to our home in Chicago for the summer, General Logan going directly from Washington to the convrogramme for the conduct of the campaign. General Logan was booked to speak almost every day untill so far away from us, I communicated with General Logan at once, to ask his permission to join my e officials on duty in the depot. He knew General Logan very well and at once busied himself to se[2 more...]
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